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Do blu-ray discs hold data longer than DVD discs?

 
 
Brian
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      02-27-2012, 01:42 PM
I'd be interested to know if the data on a Blu-ray discs are better at
storing data than DVD discs. I've read about data loses on DVD's and wonder
if it also applies to Blu-ray discs. Are Blu-Ray discs more reliable?

I've read that there is less chance of scratches due to the protected layer
added to the blu-ray disc.

--
Regards Brian
 
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David Dyer-Bennet
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      02-27-2012, 04:06 PM
Brian <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> I'd be interested to know if the data on a Blu-ray discs are better at
> storing data than DVD discs. I've read about data loses on DVD's and wonder
> if it also applies to Blu-ray discs. Are Blu-Ray discs more reliable?
>
> I've read that there is less chance of scratches due to the protected layer
> added to the blu-ray disc.


We know even less about Blu-Ray than we do about DVD; what we do know
comes from accelerated aging studies, which always involve considerable
undertainty. By the time we've had Blu-Ray disks long enough to know if
they last 100 years or not, nobody will be making new blanks any more
:-).

Given the much higher data density (meaning much smaller spots of dye
representing each bit), I certainly would not bet on longer life. If
we're lucky, they've improved the dyes and the protective coatings and
the error correction codes enough that we haven't *lost* any archival
live, but hoping for an actual improvement seems rather optimistic to
me.

Also, I use MAM gold archival DVDs; last I loooked nobody was making
anything at that quality level in Blu-Ray yet.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, (E-Mail Removed); http://dd-b.net/
Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
 
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Mxsmanic
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      02-27-2012, 07:01 PM
Brian writes:

> I'd be interested to know if the data on a Blu-ray discs are better at
> storing data than DVD discs. I've read about data loses on DVD's and wonder
> if it also applies to Blu-ray discs. Are Blu-Ray discs more reliable?


I think it depends much more on the specific recording technology used than on
whether it's DVD or Blu-ray.

The lifetime of recorded CDs (CD-R, CD-RW) still has not been accurately
determined, since the vast majority of them are still readable. The lifetime
of mass-produced CDs is presumably much longer, but all of those are still
readable, too.
 
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Brian
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      02-28-2012, 01:22 AM
Mxsmanic <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Brian writes:
>
>> I'd be interested to know if the data on a Blu-ray discs are better at
>> storing data than DVD discs. I've read about data loses on DVD's and wonder
>> if it also applies to Blu-ray discs. Are Blu-Ray discs more reliable?

>
> I think it depends much more on the specific recording technology used than on
> whether it's DVD or Blu-ray.
>
> The lifetime of recorded CDs (CD-R, CD-RW) still has not been accurately
> determined, since the vast majority of them are still readable. The lifetime
> of mass-produced CDs is presumably much longer, but all of those are still
> readable, too.


Thanks David and Mxsmanic for your replies.
Looking on the bright side I have not heard of anyone getting errors after
recording to Blu-ray disc. I have hired some Blu-Ray movies and have not
found any scratches on the surface compared to DVD's that I have hired in
the pass so maybe the protective layer gives more protection.

I read that its easier to manufacter a Blu-ray disc and manufactors are
hoping that people will switch to Blu-ray does so I don't understand why
its more expensive to buy a blank Blu-ray disc.

I have a feeling that in the near future we will be storing what was
recorded from the camera on the internet. As soon as it is recorded in the
camera it will be sent to the internet in a secure place.
YouTube and iCloud are starting to make that possible.

My local library has said that they will looking at a way where people can
download a movie to watch rather than borrow a DVD movie.

Regards Brian
 
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Mark
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      02-28-2012, 10:34 AM
On Mon, 27 Feb 2012 20:01:52 +0100, Mxsmanic <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>Brian writes:
>
>> I'd be interested to know if the data on a Blu-ray discs are better at
>> storing data than DVD discs. I've read about data loses on DVD's and wonder
>> if it also applies to Blu-ray discs. Are Blu-Ray discs more reliable?

>
>I think it depends much more on the specific recording technology used than on
>whether it's DVD or Blu-ray.
>
>The lifetime of recorded CDs (CD-R, CD-RW) still has not been accurately
>determined, since the vast majority of them are still readable.


I've come across loads of CDR/RW/DVD?R/RWs that can't be read after a
short time.

>The lifetime
>of mass-produced CDs is presumably much longer, but all of those are still
>readable, too.


I don't recall any problems with manufactured CDs but I often get
rental DVDs that won't play.
--
(\__/) M.
(='.'=) If a man stands in a forest and no woman is around
(")_(") is he still wrong?

 
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Mxsmanic
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      02-28-2012, 01:48 PM
Brian writes:

> My local library has said that they will looking at a way where people can
> download a movie to watch rather than borrow a DVD movie.


Why? That's like faxing a copy of a book each time someone wants to read it,
instead of just keeping a copy of the book on the shelf.
 
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Mxsmanic
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      02-28-2012, 01:49 PM
Mark writes:

> I've come across loads of CDR/RW/DVD?R/RWs that can't be read after a
> short time.


I've experienced one unreadable CD-R. I don't use RW variants.
 
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David Dyer-Bennet
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      02-28-2012, 03:54 PM
Mxsmanic <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> Brian writes:
>
>> My local library has said that they will looking at a way where people can
>> download a movie to watch rather than borrow a DVD movie.

>
> Why? That's like faxing a copy of a book each time someone wants to read it,
> instead of just keeping a copy of the book on the shelf.


Saves the time and energy (including gasoline use) of traveling to the
library.

Also reduces the cost of having 24 copies of the newest books (they're
loaning ebooks, too) somewhat (depending on the details of how the
publishers and authors get paid).
--
David Dyer-Bennet, (E-Mail Removed); http://dd-b.net/
Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
 
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HerHusband
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      02-28-2012, 04:13 PM
> I'd be interested to know if the data on a Blu-ray discs are better at
> storing data than DVD discs. I've read about data loses on DVD's and
> wonder if it also applies to Blu-ray discs. Are Blu-Ray discs more
> reliable?


I have not used recordable Blu-Ray discs, but have had many bad
experiences with recordable CD's losing data. Commercial DVD's are
pressed and should theoretically never wear out, but recordable discs
rely on organic dyes that can degrade over time. Factoring in the risk
of degradation, the slow read/write times, and the limited storage space,
optical discs just aren't a reliable backup media for me. They're fine
for viewing your movies, or sharing video with friends and family, but I
would never rely on them for archiving.

I personally use external USB hard drive's to perform backups. For me it
is about redundancy. I store my video's on the hard drive of my
computer, then back up nightly to an external USB hard drive. Once a
month or so, I swap my backup drive with a second USB drive I keep in a
safe deposit box at the bank. This gives me three copies of my files, so
"WHEN" any of the three drives fail, I still have two other copies I can
recover the files from.

Even if you had a recordable media (CD, DVD, Bluray, etc.) that was 100%
reliable for the next 1000 years, you still have to think about fires,
floods, thefts, warping, or simple physical breakage. Not to mention you
would need a device to play that media 1000 years from now.

Hard drives are inexpensive, reliable, and have the lowest cost per
megabyte. I bought 1TB, 2.5" external drives for less than $100 each.
The small size fits easily in my safe deposit box, whereas a CD or Bluray
disc would not.

To be fair, there are two weaknesses of hard drives:

1. The drive can be damaged if you drop it, though most drives these days
are fairly rugged. Accidents happen, but in the last 10 years I have
never dropped a drive or damaged it physically. Still, I "expect" the
drive to fail, which is why I keep multiple copies of my data. It would
be a bummer to drop a drive and damage it, but I could always get a new
drive and backup my data again using the other copies.

2. Hard drives are rewriteable, which means the data on them can be
altered unknowingly by a virus or other cause. I have never encountered
this situation, but I still create MD5 checksums using software such as
ExactFile so I can verify the contents are unaltered from time to time.

Anthony
 
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Mxsmanic
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      02-28-2012, 06:15 PM
David Dyer-Bennet writes:

> Saves the time and energy (including gasoline use) of traveling to the
> library.


So it's essentially free movie downloads ... I don't think copyright holders
will be too happy about that. One of the reasons libraries are allowed to loan
copies of copyrighted material is that the library retains ownership of the
material and borrowers cannot keep it indefinitely.
 
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