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dpi for large posters

 
 
Stardog
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      01-03-2004, 02:52 AM
Hello everyone,

I'm in the process of creating a poster which will be about 6 X 8
(feet). The source image is a photo... I've never worked in such a
larger size before and am a bit confused on how to proceed. Searches on
Google yields the suggestion of working in 72 dpi (!?) or 150. Any
suggestions for the dpi? (as 300 will be almost impossible to work in.)
Should I even do this in Photoshop? Is there any program which scales up
an image with smaller decay than pshop?

Thanks!

 
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stupid_idiot
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      01-03-2004, 05:21 PM
your post sorta scares me. You should be getting direct guidance from the printer you will be using.


"Stardog" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hello everyone,
>
> I'm in the process of creating a poster which will be about 6 X 8
> (feet). The source image is a photo... I've never worked in such a
> larger size before and am a bit confused on how to proceed. Searches on
> Google yields the suggestion of working in 72 dpi (!?) or 150. Any
> suggestions for the dpi? (as 300 will be almost impossible to work in.)
> Should I even do this in Photoshop? Is there any program which scales up
> an image with smaller decay than pshop?
>
> Thanks!
>



 
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Tam
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      01-03-2004, 06:03 PM
12" x 16" 300dpi save as Photoshop .pdf on to cd.
Most commercial printers should be able to print to required size.

Tam...


 
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nik
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      01-03-2004, 09:08 PM
It all depends on the distance that it is going to be viewed.
If the poster is going to be viewed at a distance you can use a lower DPI
than normal.
One thing you have to remember if you do a 6 foot by 8 foot poster at say
300 DPI the file size would be huge and as such you computer might not be
able to handle it.

NIK

"Stardog" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hello everyone,
>
> I'm in the process of creating a poster which will be about 6 X 8
> (feet). The source image is a photo... I've never worked in such a
> larger size before and am a bit confused on how to proceed. Searches on
> Google yields the suggestion of working in 72 dpi (!?) or 150. Any
> suggestions for the dpi? (as 300 will be almost impossible to work in.)
> Should I even do this in Photoshop? Is there any program which scales up
> an image with smaller decay than pshop?
>
> Thanks!
>



 
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Flycaster
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      01-03-2004, 10:20 PM
"nik" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:bt7b0m$g8$(E-Mail Removed)...
> It all depends on the distance that it is going to be viewed.
> If the poster is going to be viewed at a distance you can use a lower DPI
> than normal.
> One thing you have to remember if you do a 6 foot by 8 foot poster at say
> 300 DPI the file size would be huge and as such you computer might not be
> able to handle it.


It'll be even "huger" if he outputs to CMYK, which will probably be the
case.




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n8 skow
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      01-03-2004, 11:19 PM
Assuming he's using the same color profile as the print shop...

n8



> > It all depends on the distance that it is going to be viewed.
> > If the poster is going to be viewed at a distance you can use a lower

DPI
> > than normal.
> > One thing you have to remember if you do a 6 foot by 8 foot poster at

say
> > 300 DPI the file size would be huge and as such you computer might not

be
> > able to handle it.

>
> It'll be even "huger" if he outputs to CMYK, which will probably be the
> case.
>
>
>
>
> -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
> http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
> -----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----



 
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Flycaster
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      01-03-2004, 11:26 PM
"n8 skow" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:f6IJb.51566$PK3.36634@okepread01...
> Assuming he's using the same color profile as the print shop...


Having worked with my share, it's been my experience that very, very few
offest printers even know what a profile is, much less how it is used. Sad,
but true.




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Techno Aussie
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      01-04-2004, 12:46 AM
If that sounds all wrong to you... relax it is correct!
Lambda poster printers use interpolation to up-scale the image to the
appropriete dimensions. If you thought of saving a file the size of your
poster at 300 dpi... It wouldn't fit on a DVD much less a CD.
Doug


"Tam" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:bt705b$ent$(E-Mail Removed)...
> 12" x 16" 300dpi save as Photoshop .pdf on to cd.
> Most commercial printers should be able to print to required size.
>
> Tam...
>
>



 
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Jeff H.
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      01-04-2004, 01:08 AM
Some of these printers are 6 color or more... it's really best to check with
the specific printer he intends to use.

I've read that it can be better to send the file as RGB, since it will split
off into some of these machines with a wider gamut of hues... once they're
thrown out when converting to CMYK, they're gone forever. Often print
drivers are optimized for RGB...

Another idea is to send a small version of the pic - say 1 foot square....
in RGB and then CMYK to see which print looks more vivid from that machine.


JD


> It'll be even "huger" if he outputs to CMYK, which will probably be the

case.



 
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n8 skow
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      01-04-2004, 03:20 AM
If their running to offset press, it'll be 4-color...
In 6-color, your refering to a inkjet of some type aren't you?

n8


> Some of these printers are 6 color or more... it's really best to check

with
> the specific printer he intends to use.
>
> I've read that it can be better to send the file as RGB, since it will

split
> off into some of these machines with a wider gamut of hues... once they're
> thrown out when converting to CMYK, they're gone forever. Often print
> drivers are optimized for RGB...
>
> Another idea is to send a small version of the pic - say 1 foot square....
> in RGB and then CMYK to see which print looks more vivid from that

machine.
>
>
> JD
>
>
> > It'll be even "huger" if he outputs to CMYK, which will probably be the

> case.
>
>
>



 
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