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Scan resolution

 
 
Terry Pinnell
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      03-07-2005, 08:14 AM
I have a cheapish AstraSlim scanner, a couple of years old. I normally
set its resolution to 300 or 400. But its range goes right up to 9600.
I'm curious as to when such high resolutions might be used please?
What max settings do other use?

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Terry, West Sussex, UK

 
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Pete D
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      03-07-2005, 09:22 AM
High resolutions would be used when you need really high detail???? Things
like slides etc.

"Terry Pinnell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>I have a cheapish AstraSlim scanner, a couple of years old. I normally
> set its resolution to 300 or 400. But its range goes right up to 9600.
> I'm curious as to when such high resolutions might be used please?
> What max settings do other use?
>
> --
> Terry, West Sussex, UK
>



 
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David Dyer-Bennet
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      03-07-2005, 09:42 AM
Terry Pinnell <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> I have a cheapish AstraSlim scanner, a couple of years old. I normally
> set its resolution to 300 or 400. But its range goes right up to 9600.
> I'm curious as to when such high resolutions might be used please?
> What max settings do other use?


I don't know the specific model, but I'd bet a fair amount that the
"9600" isn't a real optical resolution. If so, it's meaningless.

My Umax Astra 1220U lets me select resolutions up to 9600, but the
actual optical capabilities only go up to 600x1200.
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Jerry G.
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      03-07-2005, 09:50 AM
If you are going to scan something in very great detail, a lot of resolution
would be required. For example, you may have a very small picture, and you
want to blow it up in size. With the higher the resolution, there will be
less loss.

I believe that optically, the CCD type scanners cannot exceed 1200 dpi. The
rest is done by interpolation techniques. The higher cost scanners have a
better CCD technology for reduced noise, and can employ a more sophisticated
design to have better results at the higher interpolated resolutions.

If you get in to the drum scanners that use photo tubes, then these can go
much higher in true resolution. These types of scanners will have much less
background or black noise.


--

Jerry G.
======


"Terry Pinnell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
I have a cheapish AstraSlim scanner, a couple of years old. I normally
set its resolution to 300 or 400. But its range goes right up to 9600.
I'm curious as to when such high resolutions might be used please?
What max settings do other use?

--
Terry, West Sussex, UK


 
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Ron Hunter
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      03-07-2005, 03:39 PM
Terry Pinnell wrote:
> I have a cheapish AstraSlim scanner, a couple of years old. I normally
> set its resolution to 300 or 400. But its range goes right up to 9600.
> I'm curious as to when such high resolutions might be used please?
> What max settings do other use?
>

Never.
The ONLY resolution that is important is the OPTICAL resolution. Any
resolution higher than that figure is just a marketing ploy. If you are
scanning prints, anything over 300dpi is just a waste of disk space, and
time. See www.scantips.com.


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Ron Hunter (E-Mail Removed)
 
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Ron Hunter
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      03-07-2005, 03:40 PM
Jerry G. wrote:
> If you are going to scan something in very great detail, a lot of resolution
> would be required. For example, you may have a very small picture, and you
> want to blow it up in size. With the higher the resolution, there will be
> less loss.
>
> I believe that optically, the CCD type scanners cannot exceed 1200 dpi. The
> rest is done by interpolation techniques. The higher cost scanners have a
> better CCD technology for reduced noise, and can employ a more sophisticated
> design to have better results at the higher interpolated resolutions.
>
> If you get in to the drum scanners that use photo tubes, then these can go
> much higher in true resolution. These types of scanners will have much less
> background or black noise.
>
>


And a MUCH larger price tag!


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Ron Hunter (E-Mail Removed)
 
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