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stitching together panoramas

 
 
Tim W
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      08-22-2011, 12:36 PM
I am not a photographer.

I have a project on at the moment which requires me to stand on a hilltop
and photograph the view to the horizon not as a whole panorama but across
maybe 60 to 90 degrees from left to right. Obviously that will require a
number of shots and I need a simple program to stitch the shots together to
make a single long frame. I would be grateful for some recommendations for
software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs. I am
using a Canon A460. I could get hold of am A640 which I _think_ has its own
internal method for joining frames but I don't really want the delay, I
doubt the better camera is necessary and I presume the operation would be
better done on the PC anyway. Am I wrong?

Once it is done I need to do a little bit of work with compass and maps then
a vector drawing program to overlay compass bearings, point out some
features of the landscape and routes between them but I will be fine with
that part of the work, no probs, same with the general fixing of photos and
resolutions.

TIA

Tim W


 
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Geoff Berrow
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      08-22-2011, 01:08 PM
On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.


Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
http://hugin.sourceforge.net/

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My opinions, not the committee's, mine.
Simple RFDs www.4theweb.co.uk/rfdmaker

 
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Harry Stottle
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      08-22-2011, 01:23 PM
"Geoff Berrow" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
>>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
>>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.

>
> Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
> http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
>

And remember to get the camera level on a sturdy tripod, (preferably using a
bubble level for panoramas). and overlap each image by about 25%, this way
you will help the programme stitch the image together, and get much better
results.
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Tim W
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      08-22-2011, 01:36 PM

"Harry Stottle" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:yLs4q.180568$(E-Mail Removed)2...
> "Geoff Berrow" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <(E-Mail Removed)>
>> wrote:
>>
>>>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
>>>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
>>>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.

>>
>> Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
>> http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
>>

> And remember to get the camera level on a sturdy tripod, (preferably using
> a bubble level for panoramas). and overlap each image by about 25%, this
> way you will help the programme stitch the image together, and get much
> better results.
> --


Good thinking! I have a tripod somewhere. I will set it up on the
triangulation pillar on the hilltop. No bubble but I will get it level
enough.

Tim W


 
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David Littlewood
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      08-22-2011, 05:18 PM
In article <j2tm1n$4r4$(E-Mail Removed)>, Tim W <(E-Mail Removed)>
writes
>
>"Harry Stottle" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:yLs4q.180568$(E-Mail Removed)2...
>> "Geoff Berrow" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <(E-Mail Removed)>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
>>>>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
>>>>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.
>>>
>>> Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
>>> http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
>>>

>> And remember to get the camera level on a sturdy tripod, (preferably using
>> a bubble level for panoramas). and overlap each image by about 25%, this
>> way you will help the programme stitch the image together, and get much
>> better results.
>> --

>
>Good thinking! I have a tripod somewhere. I will set it up on the
>triangulation pillar on the hilltop. No bubble but I will get it level
>enough.
>
>Tim W
>

Tim,

Good advice. Just remember though that it is important to level the
*tripod* and not just the camera. That is, the axis of rotation of the
tripod head must be accurately vertical, or the FoV will rise and fall
as you rotate.

David
--
David Littlewood
 
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cupra
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      08-22-2011, 05:19 PM
>"Tim W" wrote in message news:j2tih9$efa$(E-Mail Removed)...
>I am not a photographer.
>
>I have a project on at the moment which requires me to stand on a hilltop
>and photograph the view to the horizon not as a whole panorama but across
>maybe 60 to 90 degrees from left to right. Obviously that will require a
>number of shots and I need a simple program to stitch the shots together to
>make a single long frame. I would be grateful for some recommendations for
>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs. I am
>using a Canon A460. I could get hold of am A640 which I _think_ has its
>own internal method for joining frames but I don't really want the delay, I
>doubt the better camera is necessary and I presume the operation would be
>better done on the PC anyway. Am I wrong?
>

<snip>

If you want 'no-fuss' try:

http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/...roups/ivm/ICE/

Only heard about this a couple of weeks ago and it's performed flawlessly so
far!

Make sure you overlap at least a third of each frame, shoot in portrait and
leave some 'space' at top and bottom of each frame as the software will
'warp' the image and you can end up losing top/bottom detail.

 
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Bruce
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      08-22-2011, 07:32 PM
David Littlewood <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>In article <j2tm1n$4r4$(E-Mail Removed)>, Tim W <(E-Mail Removed)>
>writes
>>"Harry Stottle" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>news:yLs4q.180568$(E-Mail Removed)2...
>>> "Geoff Berrow" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>> On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <(E-Mail Removed)>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
>>>>>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
>>>>>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.
>>>>
>>>> Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
>>>> http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
>>>>
>>> And remember to get the camera level on a sturdy tripod, (preferably using
>>> a bubble level for panoramas). and overlap each image by about 25%, this
>>> way you will help the programme stitch the image together, and get much
>>> better results.
>>> --

>>
>>Good thinking! I have a tripod somewhere. I will set it up on the
>>triangulation pillar on the hilltop. No bubble but I will get it level
>>enough.
>>
>>Tim W
>>

>Tim,
>
>Good advice. Just remember though that it is important to level the
>*tripod* and not just the camera. That is, the axis of rotation of the
>tripod head must be accurately vertical, or the FoV will rise and fall
>as you rotate.



That's good advice.

Personally, I would be tempted to borrow one of the latest Sony
digicams that offer the "sweep panorama" feature. Like all the very
best ideas, it is brilliantly simple. The results are of excellent
quality. No tripod needed!

 
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Tim W
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      08-22-2011, 07:41 PM

"Bruce" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> David Littlewood <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>In article <j2tm1n$4r4$(E-Mail Removed)>, Tim W <(E-Mail Removed)>
>>writes
>>>"Harry Stottle" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>news:yLs4q.180568$(E-Mail Removed)2...
>>>> "Geoff Berrow" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>> On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <(E-Mail Removed)>
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
>>>>>>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and
>>>>>>easily
>>>>>>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.
>>>>>
>>>>> Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
>>>>> http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
>>>>>
>>>> And remember to get the camera level on a sturdy tripod, (preferably
>>>> using
>>>> a bubble level for panoramas). and overlap each image by about 25%,
>>>> this
>>>> way you will help the programme stitch the image together, and get much
>>>> better results.
>>>> --
>>>
>>>Good thinking! I have a tripod somewhere. I will set it up on the
>>>triangulation pillar on the hilltop. No bubble but I will get it level
>>>enough.
>>>
>>>Tim W
>>>

>>Tim,
>>
>>Good advice. Just remember though that it is important to level the
>>*tripod* and not just the camera. That is, the axis of rotation of the
>>tripod head must be accurately vertical, or the FoV will rise and fall
>>as you rotate.

>
>
> That's good advice.
>
> Personally, I would be tempted to borrow one of the latest Sony
> digicams that offer the "sweep panorama" feature. Like all the very
> best ideas, it is brilliantly simple. The results are of excellent
> quality. No tripod needed!
>


I am sure that is a good bit of kit.

I went up and did a trial run thisafternoon and there is one factor which I
think will be more important than any other. That is if I can get to the
site in the sunshine, in the early morning, before it is too high, while it
is still behind me, maybe after rain but certainly before any haze or mist
develops - then I will get the best colours, the best clarity, the best
definition of contours and depth of perspective and I will have a good
image. No amount of money spent in Jessops or time at the pc will buy me
that.

6.30am tomorrow then.

Tim W


 
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Bruce
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      08-22-2011, 07:45 PM
"Tim W" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>"Bruce" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
>> David Littlewood <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>In article <j2tm1n$4r4$(E-Mail Removed)>, Tim W <(E-Mail Removed)>
>>>writes
>>>>"Harry Stottle" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>news:yLs4q.180568$(E-Mail Removed)2...
>>>>> "Geoff Berrow" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>>> On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <(E-Mail Removed)>
>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
>>>>>>>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and
>>>>>>>easily
>>>>>>>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
>>>>>> http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
>>>>>>
>>>>> And remember to get the camera level on a sturdy tripod, (preferably
>>>>> using
>>>>> a bubble level for panoramas). and overlap each image by about 25%,
>>>>> this
>>>>> way you will help the programme stitch the image together, and get much
>>>>> better results.
>>>>> --
>>>>
>>>>Good thinking! I have a tripod somewhere. I will set it up on the
>>>>triangulation pillar on the hilltop. No bubble but I will get it level
>>>>enough.
>>>>
>>>>Tim W
>>>>
>>>Tim,
>>>
>>>Good advice. Just remember though that it is important to level the
>>>*tripod* and not just the camera. That is, the axis of rotation of the
>>>tripod head must be accurately vertical, or the FoV will rise and fall
>>>as you rotate.

>>
>>
>> That's good advice.
>>
>> Personally, I would be tempted to borrow one of the latest Sony
>> digicams that offer the "sweep panorama" feature. Like all the very
>> best ideas, it is brilliantly simple. The results are of excellent
>> quality. No tripod needed!
>>

>
>I am sure that is a good bit of kit.
>
>I went up and did a trial run thisafternoon and there is one factor which I
>think will be more important than any other. That is if I can get to the
>site in the sunshine, in the early morning, before it is too high, while it
>is still behind me, maybe after rain but certainly before any haze or mist
>develops - then I will get the best colours, the best clarity, the best
>definition of contours and depth of perspective and I will have a good
>image. No amount of money spent in Jessops or time at the pc will buy me
>that.
>
>6.30am tomorrow then.



Good luck! It is really heartening to hear from someone who
understands about light. It is the single most important aspect of
photography, yet so very few "photographers" bother to pay it any
attention, except when deciding whether or not to use flash.

 
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Tim W
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      08-22-2011, 08:11 PM

"Bruce" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> "Tim W" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>


>>I went up and did a trial run thisafternoon and there is one factor which
>>I
>>think will be more important than any other. That is if I can get to the
>>site in the sunshine, in the early morning, before it is too high, while
>>it
>>is still behind me, maybe after rain but certainly before any haze or mist
>>develops - then I will get the best colours, the best clarity, the best
>>definition of contours and depth of perspective and I will have a good
>>image. No amount of money spent in Jessops or time at the pc will buy me
>>that.
>>
>>6.30am tomorrow then.

>
>
> Good luck! It is really heartening to hear from someone who
> understands about light. It is the single most important aspect of
> photography, yet so very few "photographers" bother to pay it any
> attention, except when deciding whether or not to use flash.
>


Thanks. I have very little understanding but it was obvious when I got up
there. I really appreciate the help from people here. I will show you the
results

Tim W


 
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