Amateur's pondering on f-stop and such . . D70s

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Ole Kvaal, Jan 11, 2008.

  1. Ole Kvaal

    Ole Kvaal Guest

    Hi. To begin with: I'm totally new to photography, and although I am
    beginning to grasp the shutter/aperture relationship, there's one
    thing I've come across on a couple of occasions, which I can't figure
    out. As far as I've read, when choosing a certain f-stop value on my
    Nikon D70s, "your camera's light meter will indicate when the frame is
    correctly exposed, as you adjust your shutter speed. Once the
    exposure is correct, that becomes your image's required settings".
    Where is this indicated? Is that the little green dot at the bottom
    left of my view-finder, or is it somewhere/something else?

    Thanks in advance,
    ole k
     
    Ole Kvaal, Jan 11, 2008
    #1
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  2. If you are in M (manual) mode on the camera, you will see a scale in the
    viewfinder, with a midpoint and markings to the left and right. For
    "correct" exposure, adjust the shutter speed until the lines on the scale
    approach the midpont.


    "Ole Kvaal" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi. To begin with: I'm totally new to photography, and although I am
    > beginning to grasp the shutter/aperture relationship, there's one
    > thing I've come across on a couple of occasions, which I can't figure
    > out. As far as I've read, when choosing a certain f-stop value on my
    > Nikon D70s, "your camera's light meter will indicate when the frame is
    > correctly exposed, as you adjust your shutter speed. Once the
    > exposure is correct, that becomes your image's required settings".
    > Where is this indicated? Is that the little green dot at the bottom
    > left of my view-finder, or is it somewhere/something else?
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > ole k
     
    EUGENE HURWITZ, Jan 11, 2008
    #2
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  3. Ole Kvaal

    ole kvaal Guest

    EUGENE HURWITZ wrote:
    > If you are in M (manual) mode on the camera, you will see a scale in the
    > viewfinder, with a midpoint and markings to the left and right. For
    > "correct" exposure, adjust the shutter speed until the lines on the scale
    > approach the midpont.



    Ah - in the M mode, that's it! Thanks a lot, Eugene!

    rgds,
    ole k
     
    ole kvaal, Jan 11, 2008
    #3
  4. Ole Kvaal

    Not4wood Guest

    BTW, just FYI that little green dot means that your subject in the
    viewfinder is in Focus.

    Not4wood





    "ole kvaal" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > EUGENE HURWITZ wrote:
    >> If you are in M (manual) mode on the camera, you will see a scale in the
    >> viewfinder, with a midpoint and markings to the left and right. For
    >> "correct" exposure, adjust the shutter speed until the lines on the scale
    >> approach the midpont.

    >
    >
    > Ah - in the M mode, that's it! Thanks a lot, Eugene!
    >
    > rgds,
    > ole k
     
    Not4wood, Jan 11, 2008
    #4
  5. Ole Kvaal

    Paul Furman Guest

    ole kvaal wrote:
    > EUGENE HURWITZ wrote:
    >> If you are in M (manual) mode on the camera, you will see a scale in
    >> the viewfinder, with a midpoint and markings to the left and right.
    >> For "correct" exposure, adjust the shutter speed until the lines on
    >> the scale approach the midpont.

    >
    > Ah - in the M mode, that's it! Thanks a lot, Eugene!


    You should also see it in A & S mode, adjustable with exposure compensation.
     
    Paul Furman, Jan 11, 2008
    #5
  6. Ole Kvaal

    Frank Arthur Guest

    "Ole Kvaal" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi. To begin with: I'm totally new to photography, and although I am
    > beginning to grasp the shutter/aperture relationship, there's one
    > thing I've come across on a couple of occasions, which I can't
    > figure
    > out. As far as I've read, when choosing a certain f-stop value on my
    > Nikon D70s, "your camera's light meter will indicate when the frame
    > is
    > correctly exposed, as you adjust your shutter speed. Once the
    > exposure is correct, that becomes your image's required settings".
    > Where is this indicated? Is that the little green dot at the bottom
    > left of my view-finder, or is it somewhere/something else?
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > ole k


    Choose the S (Shutter Priority) setting and pick a fast shutter speed
    to stop action or pick a slow shutter speed if you want to
    deliberately blur the image.
    Choose the A(Aperature Priority) and pick a smaller diaphragm
    setting(which means a higher number) if you want to have much depth of
    field or pick a larger diaphragm setting (a lower number) if you want
    to have a limited depth of field.
     
    Frank Arthur, Jan 11, 2008
    #6
  7. Ole Kvaal

    C J Campbell Guest

    On 2008-01-11 05:59:10 -0800, Ole Kvaal <> said:

    > Hi. To begin with: I'm totally new to photography, and although I am
    > beginning to grasp the shutter/aperture relationship, there's one
    > thing I've come across on a couple of occasions, which I can't figure
    > out. As far as I've read, when choosing a certain f-stop value on my
    > Nikon D70s, "your camera's light meter will indicate when the frame is
    > correctly exposed, as you adjust your shutter speed. Once the
    > exposure is correct, that becomes your image's required settings".
    > Where is this indicated? Is that the little green dot at the bottom
    > left of my view-finder, or is it somewhere/something else?
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > ole k


    The little green dot means the camera thinks your subject is in focus.
    Eugene already answered your main question.
    --
    Waddling Eagle
    World Famous Flight Instructor
     
    C J Campbell, Jan 11, 2008
    #7
  8. "Ole Kvaal" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi. To begin with: I'm totally new to photography, and although I am
    > beginning to grasp the shutter/aperture relationship, there's one
    > thing I've come across on a couple of occasions, which I can't figure
    > out. As far as I've read, when choosing a certain f-stop value on my
    > Nikon D70s, "your camera's light meter will indicate when the frame is
    > correctly exposed, as you adjust your shutter speed. Once the
    > exposure is correct, that becomes your image's required settings".


    Can you give us a page number for that? It sounds like you're reading about
    the manual mode.


    > Where is this indicated? Is that the little green dot at the bottom
    > left of my view-finder,


    That green dot just comes on when the focus is correct. It's mostly for use
    when focusing the lens manually.

    > or is it somewhere/something else?


    When you're in manual mode (M on the dial) you'll see the light meter scale
    at the bottom of your viewfinder, just to the right of the F number. As you
    rotate the rear command dial you'll see the shutter speed change (to the
    left of the F number) and the over- or under-exposure will be indicated on
    the light meter scale. The scale does not appear in any mode other than M.

    Neil
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > ole k
     
    Neil Harrington, Jan 11, 2008
    #8
  9. Ole Kvaal

    ole kvaal Guest

    Neil Harrington wrote:
    > "Ole Kvaal" <> wrote in message
    >> As far as I've read, when choosing a certain f-stop value on my
    >> Nikon D70s, "your camera's light meter will indicate when the frame is
    >> correctly exposed, as you adjust your shutter speed. Once the
    >> exposure is correct, that becomes your image's required settings".

    >
    > Can you give us a page number for that? It sounds like you're reading about
    > the manual mode.


    Sorry, I was a bit unclear about this. I was quoting an article I was
    checking on the internet when I wrote my original message. I must admit
    I couldn't quite make out whether it was talking about Manual mode or
    not. Anyway, thanks to everyone who has replied to this, and also
    brought me some further information. You've been most kind and helpful.

    rgds,
    ole k
     
    ole kvaal, Jan 11, 2008
    #9
  10. Ole Kvaal

    Ray Paseur Guest

    One other note. Your camera meter wants everything to be "18% gray" and
    adjusts its exposures as if it is looking at gray. That means you want
    to adjust the exposure if what you're looking at is not gray. If you're
    looking at a polar bear in a snowstorm, change your exposure to
    OVEREXPOSE by a stop or two. If you're at a coal mine, you should
    UNDEREXPOSE relative to the infromation in the camera. Doing this will
    give you better images. If you don't do this, your snow scenes will
    look grayish, because the camera meter is seeking a gray average.

    Many cameras give you the option to bracket the exposure, taking several
    images at nearby exposure settings. In iffy light, this is always a
    good idea.

    HTH ~Ray
    ---
    ole kvaal <> wrote in
    news::

    > Neil Harrington wrote:
    >> "Ole Kvaal" <> wrote in message
    >>> As far as I've read, when choosing a certain f-stop value on my
    >>> Nikon D70s, "your camera's light meter will indicate when the frame
    >>> is correctly exposed, as you adjust your shutter speed. Once the
    >>> exposure is correct, that becomes your image's required settings".

    >>
    >> Can you give us a page number for that? It sounds like you're reading
    >> about the manual mode.

    >
    > Sorry, I was a bit unclear about this. I was quoting an article I was
    > checking on the internet when I wrote my original message. I must
    > admit I couldn't quite make out whether it was talking about Manual
    > mode or not. Anyway, thanks to everyone who has replied to this, and
    > also brought me some further information. You've been most kind and
    > helpful.
    >
    > rgds,
    > ole k
    >
    >
     
    Ray Paseur, Jan 12, 2008
    #10
  11. Ole Kvaal

    crownfield Guest

    In article <99d86c42-45a5-46e6-ba06-
    >, says...
    -Hi. To begin with: I'm totally new to photography, and although I am
    -beginning to grasp the shutter/aperture relationship, there's one
    -thing I've come across on a couple of occasions, which I can't figure
    -out. As far as I've read, when choosing a certain f-stop value on my
    -Nikon D70s, "your camera's light meter will indicate when the frame is
    -correctly exposed, as you adjust your shutter speed. Once the
    -exposure is correct, that becomes your image's required settings".
    -Where is this indicated? Is that the little green dot at the bottom
    -left of my view-finder, or is it somewhere/something else?

    have you skimmed through your manual yet...
    what does it say about your camera?

    -
    -Thanks in advance,
    -ole k
    -

    --
    Bob Crownfield
     
    crownfield, Jan 12, 2008
    #11
  12. Ole Kvaal

    ole kvaal Guest

    crownfield wrote:
    > have you skimmed through your manual yet...


    Yes, I have. I'm re-skimming it now. I even purchased Thom Hogan's D70s
    book for further reading. Still . . .

    > what does it say about your camera?


    At the moment, far too much, I think. But I guess this will get better
    as I take a course in elementary photography starting in March. Right
    now though, I'll have to manage by reading books and web-sites. But I
    couldn't quite make it past this one question (and probably, more to
    follow).


    cheers,
    ole k
     
    ole kvaal, Jan 12, 2008
    #12
  13. Ole Kvaal

    ole kvaal Guest

    Ray Paseur wrote:
    > One other note. Your camera meter wants everything to be "18% gray" and
    > adjusts its exposures as if it is looking at gray. That means you want
    > to adjust the exposure if what you're looking at is not gray. If you're
    > looking at a polar bear in a snowstorm, change your exposure to
    > OVEREXPOSE by a stop or two. If you're at a coal mine, you should
    > UNDEREXPOSE relative to the infromation in the camera. Doing this will
    > give you better images. If you don't do this, your snow scenes will
    > look grayish, because the camera meter is seeking a gray average.
    >
    > Many cameras give you the option to bracket the exposure, taking several
    > images at nearby exposure settings. In iffy light, this is always a
    > good idea.



    Thanks a lot, Ray. I'll remember this. But AFAIK, on the Nikon exposure
    scale in the view-finder, over-exposing is displayed on left side of the
    "0", as under-exposing is on the right? A bit confusing to begin with,
    but I'll get used to it.


    rgds
    ole k
     
    ole kvaal, Jan 12, 2008
    #13
  14. Ole Kvaal

    Paul Furman Guest

    ole kvaal wrote:
    > AFAIK, on the Nikon exposure
    > scale in the view-finder, over-exposing is displayed on left side of the
    > "0", as under-exposing is on the right? A bit confusing to begin with,
    > but I'll get used to it.


    Still very counterintuitive to me. I have no idea why they do that!
     
    Paul Furman, Jan 12, 2008
    #14
  15. Ole Kvaal

    nospam Guest

    In article <217ij.35661$>, Paul
    Furman <> wrote:

    > ole kvaal wrote:
    > > AFAIK, on the Nikon exposure
    > > scale in the view-finder, over-exposing is displayed on left side of the
    > > "0", as under-exposing is on the right? A bit confusing to begin with,
    > > but I'll get used to it.

    >
    > Still very counterintuitive to me. I have no idea why they do that!


    the explanation i've heard is so that you turn the control wheel
    towards 0 on the scale to obtain the proper exposure. in other words,
    the scale moves in the direction of the wheel direction. on some
    cameras (e.g. d300) you can reverse either or both.
     
    nospam, Jan 12, 2008
    #15
  16. Ole Kvaal

    crownfield Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    -crownfield wrote:
    -> have you skimmed through your manual yet...
    -
    -Yes, I have. I'm re-skimming it now. I even purchased Thom Hogan's D70s
    -book for further reading. Still . . .
    -
    -> what does it say about your camera?
    -
    -At the moment, far too much, I think. But I guess this will get better
    -as I take a course in elementary photography starting in March. Right
    -now though, I'll have to manage by reading books and web-sites. But I
    -couldn't quite make it past this one question (and probably, more to
    -follow).


    your ttl meter reads reflected light. good and bad.
    It tries to make every exposure middle tone.

    with so many metered areas, it does really well,
    because the whole scene usually will average out.
    spot metering ignores the unselected areas
    when you know that the exposure depoends on one area,
    like a face.

    when 90 % of the scene is very light, or very dark,
    the meter can be fooled, called subject failure.
    if you photograph a white card and a black card,
    each full frame, they should look remarkably the same,
    because the meter did not know the difference.
    (subject failure)

    iso, f stop, and shutter speed work together for exposure.
    double iso, 1 f-stop less, half the shutter speed
    all increase the exposure by one stop.

    histogram shows how the your scene was exposed.
    underexposed move the histogram to the left, over exposed to the right.

    page 8, #14 tells you what the camera thinks of the exposure.
    it does not know about subject failure.

    you can take an P exposure, note the f stop and shutter, and set them
    manually. take an exposure, and check the histogram.
    it should be centered, but not on the right edge.

    Note also the flashing highlights mode for the playback.
    if you increase exposure until the flashing starts,
    you should be getting a good solid exposure.

    sometimes you will select to blow the highlights
    in special problem exposures.

    try both ways, and see how the images look to you.
    check noise in shadows, and what the loss of highlights does
    to the scene you saw and shot.


    the overload is normal.
    just experiment and evaluate.

    good luck.

    -
    -
    -cheers,
    -ole k
    -
    -
    -

    --
    Bob Crownfield
     
    crownfield, Jan 12, 2008
    #16
  17. Ole Kvaal

    Paul Furman Guest

    nospam wrote:
    > In article <217ij.35661$>, Paul
    > Furman <> wrote:
    >
    >> ole kvaal wrote:
    >>> AFAIK, on the Nikon exposure
    >>> scale in the view-finder, over-exposing is displayed on left side of the
    >>> "0", as under-exposing is on the right? A bit confusing to begin with,
    >>> but I'll get used to it.

    >> Still very counterintuitive to me. I have no idea why they do that!

    >
    > the explanation i've heard is so that you turn the control wheel
    > towards 0 on the scale to obtain the proper exposure. in other words,
    > the scale moves in the direction of the wheel direction. on some
    > cameras (e.g. d300) you can reverse either or both.


    OK I see you can reverse the dials but not the meter. I guess it's
    standard on all cameras but intuitively if I want a brighter exposure, I
    want to 'turn up the volume', not down.
     
    Paul Furman, Jan 12, 2008
    #17
  18. Ole Kvaal

    nospam Guest

    In article <169ij.7490$>, Paul
    Furman <> wrote:

    > > the explanation i've heard is so that you turn the control wheel
    > > towards 0 on the scale to obtain the proper exposure. in other words,
    > > the scale moves in the direction of the wheel direction. on some
    > > cameras (e.g. d300) you can reverse either or both.

    >
    > OK I see you can reverse the dials but not the meter.


    on the d300 (and some others, but not all) you can reverse both the
    direction of the indicator and the wheel direction, but that would
    leave you with the same issue but in the other direction. you'd
    probably want to reverse only one. :) you can even swap the function
    of the front and back wheels.

    > I guess it's
    > standard on all cameras but intuitively if I want a brighter exposure, I
    > want to 'turn up the volume', not down.


    agreed, but their reasoning sort of makes sense too. if you want the
    indicator to go to the right you dial to the right.
     
    nospam, Jan 12, 2008
    #18
  19. Ole Kvaal

    Paul Furman Guest

    nospam wrote:
    > Paul Furman wrote:
    >
    > on the d300 (and some others, but not all) you can reverse both the
    > direction of the indicator and the wheel direction, but that would
    > leave you with the same issue but in the other direction. you'd
    > probably want to reverse only one. :) you can even swap the function
    > of the front and back wheels.


    Not for the D200. I would switch both if I could!

    >> I guess it's standard on all cameras but intuitively if I want a
    >> brighter exposure, I want to 'turn up the volume', not down.

    >
    > agreed, but their reasoning sort of makes sense too. if you want the
    > indicator to go to the right you dial to the right.


    Given that the meter reads backwards, at least the dials are coordinated
    with that.
     
    Paul Furman, Jan 12, 2008
    #19
  20. Ole Kvaal

    ole kvaal Guest

    crownfield wrote:

    (snip)


    Thanks for your explainations and patience. :)

    rgds,
    ole k
     
    ole kvaal, Jan 12, 2008
    #20
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