dpi for large posters

Discussion in 'Photoshop' started by Stardog, Jan 3, 2004.

  1. Stardog

    Stardog Guest

    Hello everyone,

    I'm in the process of creating a poster which will be about 6 X 8
    (feet). The source image is a photo... I've never worked in such a
    larger size before and am a bit confused on how to proceed. Searches on
    Google yields the suggestion of working in 72 dpi (!?) or 150. Any
    suggestions for the dpi? (as 300 will be almost impossible to work in.)
    Should I even do this in Photoshop? Is there any program which scales up
    an image with smaller decay than pshop?

    Thanks!
     
    Stardog, Jan 3, 2004
    #1
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  2. Stardog

    stupid_idiot Guest

    your post sorta scares me. You should be getting direct guidance from the printer you will be using.


    "Stardog" <> wrote in message news:...
    > Hello everyone,
    >
    > I'm in the process of creating a poster which will be about 6 X 8
    > (feet). The source image is a photo... I've never worked in such a
    > larger size before and am a bit confused on how to proceed. Searches on
    > Google yields the suggestion of working in 72 dpi (!?) or 150. Any
    > suggestions for the dpi? (as 300 will be almost impossible to work in.)
    > Should I even do this in Photoshop? Is there any program which scales up
    > an image with smaller decay than pshop?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
     
    stupid_idiot, Jan 3, 2004
    #2
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  3. Stardog

    Tam Guest

    12" x 16" 300dpi save as Photoshop .pdf on to cd.
    Most commercial printers should be able to print to required size.

    Tam...
     
    Tam, Jan 3, 2004
    #3
  4. Stardog

    nik Guest

    It all depends on the distance that it is going to be viewed.
    If the poster is going to be viewed at a distance you can use a lower DPI
    than normal.
    One thing you have to remember if you do a 6 foot by 8 foot poster at say
    300 DPI the file size would be huge and as such you computer might not be
    able to handle it.

    NIK

    "Stardog" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello everyone,
    >
    > I'm in the process of creating a poster which will be about 6 X 8
    > (feet). The source image is a photo... I've never worked in such a
    > larger size before and am a bit confused on how to proceed. Searches on
    > Google yields the suggestion of working in 72 dpi (!?) or 150. Any
    > suggestions for the dpi? (as 300 will be almost impossible to work in.)
    > Should I even do this in Photoshop? Is there any program which scales up
    > an image with smaller decay than pshop?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
     
    nik, Jan 3, 2004
    #4
  5. Stardog

    Flycaster Guest

    "nik" <> wrote in message
    news:bt7b0m$g8$...
    > It all depends on the distance that it is going to be viewed.
    > If the poster is going to be viewed at a distance you can use a lower DPI
    > than normal.
    > One thing you have to remember if you do a 6 foot by 8 foot poster at say
    > 300 DPI the file size would be huge and as such you computer might not be
    > able to handle it.


    It'll be even "huger" if he outputs to CMYK, which will probably be the
    case.




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    Flycaster, Jan 3, 2004
    #5
  6. Stardog

    n8 skow Guest

    Assuming he's using the same color profile as the print shop...

    n8



    > > It all depends on the distance that it is going to be viewed.
    > > If the poster is going to be viewed at a distance you can use a lower

    DPI
    > > than normal.
    > > One thing you have to remember if you do a 6 foot by 8 foot poster at

    say
    > > 300 DPI the file size would be huge and as such you computer might not

    be
    > > able to handle it.

    >
    > It'll be even "huger" if he outputs to CMYK, which will probably be the
    > case.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
    > http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
    > -----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
     
    n8 skow, Jan 3, 2004
    #6
  7. Stardog

    Flycaster Guest

    "n8 skow" <> wrote in message
    news:f6IJb.51566$PK3.36634@okepread01...
    > Assuming he's using the same color profile as the print shop...


    Having worked with my share, it's been my experience that very, very few
    offest printers even know what a profile is, much less how it is used. Sad,
    but true.




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    -----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
     
    Flycaster, Jan 3, 2004
    #7
  8. If that sounds all wrong to you... relax it is correct!
    Lambda poster printers use interpolation to up-scale the image to the
    appropriete dimensions. If you thought of saving a file the size of your
    poster at 300 dpi... It wouldn't fit on a DVD much less a CD.
    Doug


    "Tam" <> wrote in message
    news:bt705b$ent$...
    > 12" x 16" 300dpi save as Photoshop .pdf on to cd.
    > Most commercial printers should be able to print to required size.
    >
    > Tam...
    >
    >
     
    Techno Aussie, Jan 4, 2004
    #8
  9. Stardog

    Jeff H. Guest

    Some of these printers are 6 color or more... it's really best to check with
    the specific printer he intends to use.

    I've read that it can be better to send the file as RGB, since it will split
    off into some of these machines with a wider gamut of hues... once they're
    thrown out when converting to CMYK, they're gone forever. Often print
    drivers are optimized for RGB...

    Another idea is to send a small version of the pic - say 1 foot square....
    in RGB and then CMYK to see which print looks more vivid from that machine.


    JD


    > It'll be even "huger" if he outputs to CMYK, which will probably be the

    case.
     
    Jeff H., Jan 4, 2004
    #9
  10. Stardog

    n8 skow Guest

    If their running to offset press, it'll be 4-color...
    In 6-color, your refering to a inkjet of some type aren't you?

    n8


    > Some of these printers are 6 color or more... it's really best to check

    with
    > the specific printer he intends to use.
    >
    > I've read that it can be better to send the file as RGB, since it will

    split
    > off into some of these machines with a wider gamut of hues... once they're
    > thrown out when converting to CMYK, they're gone forever. Often print
    > drivers are optimized for RGB...
    >
    > Another idea is to send a small version of the pic - say 1 foot square....
    > in RGB and then CMYK to see which print looks more vivid from that

    machine.
    >
    >
    > JD
    >
    >
    > > It'll be even "huger" if he outputs to CMYK, which will probably be the

    > case.
    >
    >
    >
     
    n8 skow, Jan 4, 2004
    #10
  11. Stardog

    Jeff H. Guest

    The original post referred to having a 6' x 8' final result.... there are
    machines that print these dimensions for billboards, etc. The ones I've seen
    were at least 6 color units. The output resolution was something like 200
    DPI.

    This sounds like a one-time-deal for the guy, certainly not worth making
    plates for an offset press. Even cutting the final dimensions into quarters,
    there's no way this would be economical.

    here is one of many places that does it.
    http://visualmedia.iusm.iu.edu/large-printer.html

    In my home town - Calgary - one showed me two machines, one similar to the
    above with much higher resolution than the other. Both were at least 6 color
    units. The low-res machine had special inks which had a five -year outdoor
    guarantee, the other was intended to make hi-res posters for inside
    stores/restaurants etc.

    I have a feeling that sending a CMYK bitmap to either machine would produce
    muted colors compared to ripping an RGB file, that's why it's worth a test
    to know for future jobs.


    JD
     
    Jeff H., Jan 4, 2004
    #11
  12. Stardog

    n8 skow Guest

    Ahh, I should of read the post closer...
    =)

    n8



    > The original post referred to having a 6' x 8' final result.... there are
    > machines that print these dimensions for billboards, etc. The ones I've

    seen
    > were at least 6 color units. The output resolution was something like 200
    > DPI.
    >
    > This sounds like a one-time-deal for the guy, certainly not worth making
    > plates for an offset press. Even cutting the final dimensions into

    quarters,
    > there's no way this would be economical.
    >
    > here is one of many places that does it.
    > http://visualmedia.iusm.iu.edu/large-printer.html
    >
    > In my home town - Calgary - one showed me two machines, one similar to the
    > above with much higher resolution than the other. Both were at least 6

    color
    > units. The low-res machine had special inks which had a five -year outdoor
    > guarantee, the other was intended to make hi-res posters for inside
    > stores/restaurants etc.
    >
    > I have a feeling that sending a CMYK bitmap to either machine would

    produce
    > muted colors compared to ripping an RGB file, that's why it's worth a test
    > to know for future jobs.
    >
    >
    > JD
    >
    >
     
    n8 skow, Jan 4, 2004
    #12
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