Global brightening

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Alan Browne, May 6, 2005.

  1. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    Per the NYT, the amount of sunlight reaching the ground has been
    increasing over the past 10 year or so reversing a dimming trend.
    (Local dimness in Hong Kong/India remain).

    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/06/science/06bright.html

    May 6, 2005
    Earth Has Become Brighter, but No One Is Sure Why
    By KENNETH CHANG

    Reversing a decades-long trend toward "global dimming," Earth's surface
    has become brighter since 1990, scientists are reporting today.

    The brightening means that more sunlight - and thus more heat - is
    reaching the ground. That could partly explain the record-high global
    temperatures reported in the late 1990's, and it could accelerate the
    planet's warming trend.

    "We see the dimming is no longer there," said Dr. Martin Wild, a
    climatologist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich and
    the lead author of one of three papers analyzing sunlight that appear in
    today's issue of the journal Science. "If anything, there is a brightening."

    Some scientists have reported that from 1960 to 1990, the amount of
    sunshine reaching the ground decreased at a rate of 2 percent to 3
    percent per decade.

    In some places, the brightening of the 1990's has more than offset the
    dimming, Dr. Wild said. In other places, like Hong Kong, which lost more
    than a third of its sunlight, the dimming has leveled off, but skies
    remain darker than in the past. In a few places, like India, the dimming
    trend continues, he said.

    The new papers also call attention to a major gap in the understanding
    of climate. Scientists do not exactly know what caused the dimming and
    the brightening, or how they affect the rest of the climate system.

    Earth reflects about 30 percent of the incoming sunlight back into
    space. Slight changes in the reflectivity, possibly caused by changes in
    cloud cover and air pollution, can have as much impact on the climate as
    heat-trapping greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide.

    Some scientists say that the dimming and the brightening might explain
    why for many years temperatures on Earth lagged what was predicted by
    many climate models and then shot upward more recently.

    "I think what could have happened is the dimming between the 60's and
    80's counteracted the greenhouse effect," Dr. Wild said. "When the
    dimming faded, the effects of the greenhouse gases became more evident.
    There is no masking by the dimming anymore."

    But Dr. Rachel T. Pinker, a professor of meteorology at the University
    of Maryland who led the team that wrote one of the other papers, said
    the picture might not be so simple. More sunlight should increase
    evaporation rates, leading to more clouds, and the additional cloud
    cover could then increase Earth's reflectivity, limiting the warming effect.

    "I think that's a complex issue," Dr. Pinker said. "There are many
    feedbacks involved."

    The findings of Dr. Wild and his colleagues are based on data through
    2001 from a network of ground-based sensors that directly measure the
    sunlight hitting the ground. But the sensors are not evenly distributed,
    with the greatest number in Europe, few in Africa and South America, and
    none covering the 70 percent of Earth's surface that is water.

    Dr. Pinker's team analyzed satellite data from 1983 to 2001 that covered
    the globe. Its findings about brightening, which basically agree with
    Dr. Wild's, rely on computer models to estimate how much sunlight
    reaches the surface.

    Finally, a team led by Dr. Bruce A. Wielicki of NASA's Langley Research
    Center in Virginia reports that measurements from the agency's Aqua
    satellite show a slight decrease in the amount of light reflected off
    Earth since 2000, which corresponds to a brightening on the surface.

    The NASA findings conflict with measurements, reported last year,
    suggesting that Earth had resumed dimming since 2000. Those measurements
    looked at the illumination of the dark side of the Moon by light
    reflected off Earth.

    Dr. Philip R. Goode, a professor of physics at the New Jersey Institute
    of Technology who was one of the researchers behind last year's report,
    said it was not clear why the findings differed so markedly. "We've been
    working with them to understand the origins of the differences," Dr.
    Goode said of the Wielicki group.

    Dr. Wielicki said his data supported a report last month by a team led
    by Dr. James E. Hansen of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New
    York. In a paper published on Science's Web site, Dr. Hansen and his
    colleagues said much of the excess heat generated by global warming has
    been stored in the oceans. Even if no more greenhouse gases are added to
    the atmosphere, they said, Earth will continue to warm by 1 degree
    Fahrenheit over the coming decades, as the heat in the oceans is
    released into the air.

    Dr. Wielicki said the amount of energy coming from the Sun matched the
    gain in heat in the oceans reported by Dr. Hansen. "It is consistent
    with the ocean heat storage that the oceanographers are seeing," Dr.
    Wielicki said, "and it is consistent with the climate models'
    predictions of what the heat storage should be."

    Dr. Robert J. Charlson, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the
    University of Washington and an author of a commentary that accompanied
    the three papers, said, "This set of papers, taken together, calls
    attention for more emphasis on research in these topics."

    But he added, "Unfortunately, impediments have come up." Four years'
    worth of data from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite is unanalyzed,
    he said, because there is no money for scientists to work with it.

    Another satellite, the Deep Space Climate Observatory, which was
    scheduled to be launched on a space shuttle, awaits in storage. Proposed
    budget cuts in earth science research at NASA could limit the analysis
    of data from other satellites, Dr. Charlson said.

    --
    -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    -- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
    Alan Browne, May 6, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. From: "Alan Browne" <>

    |
    | Per the NYT, the amount of sunlight reaching the ground has been
    | increasing over the past 10 year or so reversing a dimming trend.
    | (Local dimness in Hong Kong/India remain).
    |
    | http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/06/science/06bright.html
    |
    | May 6, 2005
    | Earth Has Become Brighter, but No One Is Sure Why
    | By KENNETH CHANG
    |
    | Reversing a decades-long trend toward "global dimming," Earth's surface
    | has become brighter since 1990, scientists are reporting today.
    |
    | The brightening means that more sunlight - and thus more heat - is
    | reaching the ground. That could partly explain the record-high global
    | temperatures reported in the late 1990's, and it could accelerate the
    | planet's warming trend.
    |
    | "We see the dimming is no longer there," said Dr. Martin Wild, a
    | climatologist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich and
    | the lead author of one of three papers analyzing sunlight that appear in
    | today's issue of the journal Science. "If anything, there is a brightening."
    |
    | Some scientists have reported that from 1960 to 1990, the amount of
    | sunshine reaching the ground decreased at a rate of 2 percent to 3
    | percent per decade.
    |
    | In some places, the brightening of the 1990's has more than offset the
    | dimming, Dr. Wild said. In other places, like Hong Kong, which lost more
    | than a third of its sunlight, the dimming has leveled off, but skies
    | remain darker than in the past. In a few places, like India, the dimming
    | trend continues, he said.
    |
    | The new papers also call attention to a major gap in the understanding
    | of climate. Scientists do not exactly know what caused the dimming and
    | the brightening, or how they affect the rest of the climate system.
    |
    | Earth reflects about 30 percent of the incoming sunlight back into
    | space. Slight changes in the reflectivity, possibly caused by changes in
    | cloud cover and air pollution, can have as much impact on the climate as
    | heat-trapping greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide.
    |
    | Some scientists say that the dimming and the brightening might explain
    | why for many years temperatures on Earth lagged what was predicted by
    | many climate models and then shot upward more recently.
    |
    | "I think what could have happened is the dimming between the 60's and
    | 80's counteracted the greenhouse effect," Dr. Wild said. "When the
    | dimming faded, the effects of the greenhouse gases became more evident.
    | There is no masking by the dimming anymore."
    |
    | But Dr. Rachel T. Pinker, a professor of meteorology at the University
    | of Maryland who led the team that wrote one of the other papers, said
    | the picture might not be so simple. More sunlight should increase
    | evaporation rates, leading to more clouds, and the additional cloud
    | cover could then increase Earth's reflectivity, limiting the warming effect.
    |
    | "I think that's a complex issue," Dr. Pinker said. "There are many
    | feedbacks involved."
    |
    | The findings of Dr. Wild and his colleagues are based on data through
    | 2001 from a network of ground-based sensors that directly measure the
    | sunlight hitting the ground. But the sensors are not evenly distributed,
    | with the greatest number in Europe, few in Africa and South America, and
    | none covering the 70 percent of Earth's surface that is water.
    |
    | Dr. Pinker's team analyzed satellite data from 1983 to 2001 that covered
    | the globe. Its findings about brightening, which basically agree with
    | Dr. Wild's, rely on computer models to estimate how much sunlight
    | reaches the surface.
    |
    | Finally, a team led by Dr. Bruce A. Wielicki of NASA's Langley Research
    | Center in Virginia reports that measurements from the agency's Aqua
    | satellite show a slight decrease in the amount of light reflected off
    | Earth since 2000, which corresponds to a brightening on the surface.
    |
    | The NASA findings conflict with measurements, reported last year,
    | suggesting that Earth had resumed dimming since 2000. Those measurements
    | looked at the illumination of the dark side of the Moon by light
    | reflected off Earth.
    |
    | Dr. Philip R. Goode, a professor of physics at the New Jersey Institute
    | of Technology who was one of the researchers behind last year's report,
    | said it was not clear why the findings differed so markedly. "We've been
    | working with them to understand the origins of the differences," Dr.
    | Goode said of the Wielicki group.
    |
    | Dr. Wielicki said his data supported a report last month by a team led
    | by Dr. James E. Hansen of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New
    | York. In a paper published on Science's Web site, Dr. Hansen and his
    | colleagues said much of the excess heat generated by global warming has
    | been stored in the oceans. Even if no more greenhouse gases are added to
    | the atmosphere, they said, Earth will continue to warm by 1 degree
    | Fahrenheit over the coming decades, as the heat in the oceans is
    | released into the air.
    |
    | Dr. Wielicki said the amount of energy coming from the Sun matched the
    | gain in heat in the oceans reported by Dr. Hansen. "It is consistent
    | with the ocean heat storage that the oceanographers are seeing," Dr.
    | Wielicki said, "and it is consistent with the climate models'
    | predictions of what the heat storage should be."
    |
    | Dr. Robert J. Charlson, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the
    | University of Washington and an author of a commentary that accompanied
    | the three papers, said, "This set of papers, taken together, calls
    | attention for more emphasis on research in these topics."
    |
    | But he added, "Unfortunately, impediments have come up." Four years'
    | worth of data from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite is unanalyzed,
    | he said, because there is no money for scientists to work with it.
    |
    | Another satellite, the Deep Space Climate Observatory, which was
    | scheduled to be launched on a space shuttle, awaits in storage. Proposed
    | budget cuts in earth science research at NASA could limit the analysis
    | of data from other satellites, Dr. Charlson said.
    |
    | --
    | -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    | -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    | -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    | -- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.

    It's prabably due to the erruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines mid '91. That was a
    major erruption, It dropped the avg. Earth temperature and blocked a small percentage of
    light from reaching the earth due to the large quantity of dust thrown into the upper
    atmosphere.

    --
    Dave
    http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    David H. Lipman, May 6, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Alan Browne

    Bandicoot Guest

    "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote in message
    news:QtOee.124$_g1.26@trnddc04...
    [SNIP]
    >
    > It's prabably due to the erruption of Mount Pinatubo in the
    > Philippines mid '91. That was a major erruption, It dropped the avg. >

    Earth temperature and blocked a small percentage of light from
    > reaching the earth due to the large quantity of dust thrown into the
    > upper atmosphere.
    >


    There was an almost immediate, and statistically significant, rise in
    average light levels all over North America in the three days after 9/11 -
    so I think the dimming is due to air pollution. Air travel is the single
    most air-polluting thing man does, and the grounding of flights seems to
    have had an almost instant impact. Bad news either way.


    Peter
    Bandicoot, May 6, 2005
    #3
  4. Alan Browne

    Bandicoot Guest

    "Alan Browne" <> wrote in message
    news:wgMee.38832$...
    [SNIP]
    >
    > Dr. Robert J. Charlson, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the
    > University of Washington and an author of a commentary that
    > accompanied the three papers, said, "This set of papers, taken
    > together, calls attention for more emphasis on research in these
    > topics."
    >
    > But he added, "Unfortunately, impediments have come up." Four
    > years' worth of data from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite is
    > unanalyzed, he said, because there is no money for scientists to work
    > with it.
    >
    > Another satellite, the Deep Space Climate Observatory, which was
    > scheduled to be launched on a space shuttle, awaits in storage.
    > Proposed budget cuts in earth science research at NASA could limit
    > the analysis of data from other satellites, Dr. Charlson said.
    >


    Funny how the most spendthift administration the US has ever had wants to
    make cuts in those programmes that might reveal the facts that are
    unpapteable to their pro-oil and never-mind-about-climate-change agenda...

    ;-)


    Peter
    Bandicoot, May 6, 2005
    #4
  5. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    David H. Lipman wrote:

    >
    > It's prabably due to the erruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines mid '91. That was a
    > major erruption, It dropped the avg. Earth temperature and blocked a small percentage of
    > light from reaching the earth due to the large quantity of dust thrown into the upper
    > atmosphere.


    The article states that they're trying to figure out the "why".

    Cheers,
    Alan

    PS: A little snipping would have gone a long way there David.


    --
    -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    -- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
    Alan Browne, May 6, 2005
    #5
  6. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    Bandicoot wrote:

    > There was an almost immediate, and statistically significant, rise in
    > average light levels all over North America in the three days after 9/11 -
    > so I think the dimming is due to air pollution. Air travel is the single
    > most air-polluting thing man does, and the grounding of flights seems to
    > have had an almost instant impact. Bad news either way.


    There was a similar drop in measured air pollution following the
    blackout of the northeast a couple years ago. A lot of coal is used in
    places like Ohio and surrounds to move electrons.

    Cheers,
    Alan


    --
    -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    -- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
    Alan Browne, May 6, 2005
    #6
  7. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    Bandicoot wrote:

    > Funny how the most spendthift administration the US has ever had wants to
    > make cuts in those programmes that might reveal the facts that are
    > unpapteable to their pro-oil and never-mind-about-climate-change agenda...


    Never get between a failed oilman and reality.


    --
    -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    -- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
    Alan Browne, May 6, 2005
    #7
  8. From: "Alan Browne" <>


    |
    | The article states that they're trying to figure out the "why".
    |
    | Cheers,
    | Alan
    |
    | PS: A little snipping would have gone a long way there David.
    |
    | --
    | -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    | -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    | -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    | -- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.

    Considering it was a 1st level quote I didn't think snipping was warranted.

    --
    Dave
    http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    David H. Lipman, May 6, 2005
    #8
  9. From: "Bandicoot" <"insert_handle_here"@techemail.com>


    | There was an almost immediate, and statistically significant, rise in
    | average light levels all over North America in the three days after 9/11 -
    | so I think the dimming is due to air pollution. Air travel is the single
    | most air-polluting thing man does, and the grounding of flights seems to
    | have had an almost instant impact. Bad news either way.
    |
    | Peter
    |

    Please show me that information.

    --
    Dave
    http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    David H. Lipman, May 6, 2005
    #9
  10. Alan Browne

    Paul Bielec Guest

    Bandicoot wrote:
    > "Alan Browne" <> wrote in message
    > news:wgMee.38832$...
    > [SNIP]
    >
    >>Dr. Robert J. Charlson, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the
    >>University of Washington and an author of a commentary that
    >>accompanied the three papers, said, "This set of papers, taken
    >>together, calls attention for more emphasis on research in these
    >>topics."
    >>
    >>But he added, "Unfortunately, impediments have come up." Four
    >>years' worth of data from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite is
    >>unanalyzed, he said, because there is no money for scientists to work
    >>with it.
    >>
    >>Another satellite, the Deep Space Climate Observatory, which was
    >>scheduled to be launched on a space shuttle, awaits in storage.
    >>Proposed budget cuts in earth science research at NASA could limit
    >>the analysis of data from other satellites, Dr. Charlson said.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Funny how the most spendthift administration the US has ever had wants to
    > make cuts in those programmes that might reveal the facts that are
    > unpapteable to their pro-oil and never-mind-about-climate-change agenda...
    >
    > ;-)
    >
    >
    > Peter
    >
    >

    A redneck is not a redneck without a rifle and a V8 truck...
    Paul Bielec, May 6, 2005
    #10
  11. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    Alan Browne, May 6, 2005
    #11
  12. From: "Alan Browne" <>

    | David H. Lipman wrote:
    |
    >> Considering it was a 1st level quote I didn't think snipping was warranted.

    |
    | Snipping is always warranted.
    | --
    | -- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
    | -- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
    | -- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
    | -- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.

    That's a matter of opinion.

    --
    Dave
    http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
    http://www.ik-cs.com/got-a-virus.htm
    David H. Lipman, May 6, 2005
    #12
  13. "Bandicoot" <"insert_handle_here"@techemail.com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Alan Browne" <> wrote in message
    > news:wgMee.38832$...
    > [SNIP]
    >>
    >> Dr. Robert J. Charlson, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the
    >> University of Washington and an author of a commentary that
    >> accompanied the three papers, said, "This set of papers, taken
    >> together, calls attention for more emphasis on research in these
    >> topics."
    >>
    >> But he added, "Unfortunately, impediments have come up." Four
    >> years' worth of data from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite is
    >> unanalyzed, he said, because there is no money for scientists to work
    >> with it.
    >>
    >> Another satellite, the Deep Space Climate Observatory, which was
    >> scheduled to be launched on a space shuttle, awaits in storage.
    >> Proposed budget cuts in earth science research at NASA could limit
    >> the analysis of data from other satellites, Dr. Charlson said.
    >>

    >
    > Funny how the most spendthift administration the US has ever had wants to
    > make cuts in those programmes that might reveal the facts that are
    > unpapteable to their pro-oil and never-mind-about-climate-change agenda...
    >
    > ;-)
    >
    >
    > Peter
    >
    >

    Of course....What do you expect? And the Democrats suppress statistics that
    show its give away programs don't have any permanent effect on the overall
    poverty level. Each administration turns its back on, and ignores
    information that is contradictory to its avowed political agenda.
    William Graham, May 6, 2005
    #13
  14. Alan Browne

    Jim Redelfs Guest

    In article <d5gkvn$56m$>,
    Alan Browne <> wrote:

    > Snipping is always warranted.


    In article <6MQee.1521$hh6.278@trnddc01>,
    "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote:

    > That's a matter of opinion.


    No, that's a matter of FACT - and common, on-line courtesy.

    Those that REFUSE to edit (snip, trim, whatever) their quotes are LAZY - pure
    and simple.

    JR
    Jim Redelfs, May 6, 2005
    #14
  15. Alan Browne

    Bandicoot Guest

    "David H. Lipman" <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote in message
    news:0sPee.137$_g1.126@trnddc04...
    > From: "Bandicoot" <"insert_handle_here"@techemail.com>
    >
    >
    > | There was an almost immediate, and statistically significant, rise in
    > | average light levels all over North America in the three days after
    > | 9/11 - so I think the dimming is due to air pollution. Air travel is

    the
    > | single | most air-polluting thing man does, and the grounding of
    > | flights seems to | have had an almost instant impact. Bad news
    > | either way.
    > |
    >
    > Please show me that information.
    >


    It was academic rersearch by a climatologist quoted on a BBC documentary
    recently, along with an interview with him and otherw working in the field.
    Unfortunately that means that I don't remember the name, nor do I have a
    written reference to cite. I imagine an online search would turn it up.


    Peter
    Bandicoot, May 7, 2005
    #15
  16. Alan Browne

    Paul Furman Guest

    Alan Browne wrote:

    > http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/06/science/06bright.html
    >
    > Some scientists have reported that from 1960 to 1990, the amount of
    > sunshine reaching the ground decreased at a rate of 2 percent to 3
    > percent per decade.
    >
    > In some places, the brightening of the 1990's has more than offset the
    > dimming, Dr. Wild said. In other places, like Hong Kong, which lost more
    > than a third of its sunlight, the dimming has leveled off, but skies
    > remain darker than in the past. In a few places, like India, the dimming
    > trend continues, he said.



    So how many stops does this translate into in terms of improved camera
    performance?

    : - )


    --
    Paul Furman
    http://www.edgehill.net/1
    san francisco native plants
    Paul Furman, May 7, 2005
    #16
  17. Alan Browne

    Sheldon Guest


    >
    >
    > So how many stops does this translate into in terms of improved camera
    > performance?
    >
    > : - )


    <LOL> I was thinking that all the way through this thread.
    Sheldon, May 7, 2005
    #17
  18. Alan Browne

    Jim Redelfs Guest

    In article <>,
    "Sheldon" <> wrote:

    > > So how many stops does this translate into in terms of improved camera
    > > performance?
    > >
    > > : - )


    > <LOL> I was thinking that all the way through this thread.


    OK. Sorry for the OT rant (snipping, etc).

    Perhaps this <ahem> "global brightening" with cause my 20D+580EX to PROPERLY
    expose the "frame".

    HA!
    :)
    JR
    Jim Redelfs, May 7, 2005
    #18
  19. Alan Browne

    MrB Guest

    I know you folks spell words a little differently from us, but what is
    unpapteable?


    "Bandicoot" <"insert_handle_here"@techemail.com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Alan Browne" <> wrote in message
    > news:wgMee.38832$...
    > [SNIP]
    >>
    >> Dr. Robert J. Charlson, a professor of atmospheric sciences at the
    >> University of Washington and an author of a commentary that
    >> accompanied the three papers, said, "This set of papers, taken
    >> together, calls attention for more emphasis on research in these
    >> topics."
    >>
    >> But he added, "Unfortunately, impediments have come up." Four
    >> years' worth of data from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite is
    >> unanalyzed, he said, because there is no money for scientists to work
    >> with it.
    >>
    >> Another satellite, the Deep Space Climate Observatory, which was
    >> scheduled to be launched on a space shuttle, awaits in storage.
    >> Proposed budget cuts in earth science research at NASA could limit
    >> the analysis of data from other satellites, Dr. Charlson said.
    >>

    >
    > Funny how the most spendthift administration the US has ever had wants to
    > make cuts in those programmes that might reveal the facts that are
    > unpapteable to their pro-oil and never-mind-about-climate-change agenda...
    >
    > ;-)
    >
    >
    > Peter
    >
    >
    MrB, May 7, 2005
    #19
  20. Alan Browne

    Roxy d'Urban Guest

    On Fri, 06 May 2005 14:47:23 -0400, Alan Browne wrote:

    > David H. Lipman wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> It's prabably due to the erruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines mid '91. That was a
    >> major erruption, It dropped the avg. Earth temperature and blocked a small percentage of
    >> light from reaching the earth due to the large quantity of dust thrown into the upper
    >> atmosphere.

    >
    > The article states that they're trying to figure out the "why".
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Alan
    >
    > PS: A little snipping would have gone a long way there David.


    Netcop Browne strikes again!

    --
    "My beef about digital is that you see certain images out
    there, and things are so digital and retouched that you lose
    the person in the process - lose the rawness and the
    touchability because it is just too perfect." ~ Tony Duran
    Roxy d'Urban, May 7, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Alan Browne

    Global brightening

    Alan Browne, May 6, 2005, in forum: 35mm Cameras
    Replies:
    290
    Views:
    2,881
  2. Mark

    Brightening colors

    Mark, Feb 15, 2005, in forum: Photoshop
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    266
  3. Mark

    Brightening colors

    Mark, Feb 15, 2005, in forum: Photoshop Tutorials
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    224
  4. firoz

    We are Manufacturers of Optical Brightening agent

    firoz, Mar 7, 2007, in forum: Darkroom Developing and Printing
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    283
    firoz
    Mar 7, 2007
  5. Alan Browne

    Global brightening

    Alan Browne, May 6, 2005, in forum: Digital Cameras
    Replies:
    346
    Views:
    2,454
    ASAAR
    May 13, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page