Is there a fiddle proof digital camera available?

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Ken Oaf, Mar 5, 2005.

  1. Ken Oaf

    Ken Oaf Guest

    My elderly parents have just returned from a holiday on which they took one of
    my Olympus digital cameras along with a film camera.

    I gave them specific instructions not to touch the settings, just turn it on and
    take the photos. When the card is full, remove it and put another one in.

    They filled the first card, put the second one in then a self proclaimed expert
    told them all memory cards must be formatted prior to use and offered to do it.

    The silly bugger managed to reset the camera, which reverted to the lowest
    quality images (640x480) meaning the pictures are too small to print.

    My question is...

    Is there a fiddle proof digital camera that can have the settings locked such
    that so-called experts can't stuff things up?
     
    Ken Oaf, Mar 5, 2005
    #1
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  2. Ken Oaf

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    Ken Oaf wrote:
    > My elderly parents have just returned from a holiday on which they took one of
    > my Olympus digital cameras along with a film camera.
    >
    > I gave them specific instructions not to touch the settings, just turn it on and
    > take the photos. When the card is full, remove it and put another one in.
    >
    > They filled the first card, put the second one in then a self proclaimed expert
    > told them all memory cards must be formatted prior to use and offered to do it.
    >
    > The silly bugger managed to reset the camera, which reverted to the lowest
    > quality images (640x480) meaning the pictures are too small to print.
    >
    > My question is...
    >
    > Is there a fiddle proof digital camera that can have the settings locked such
    > that so-called experts can't stuff things up?


    Hi...

    Wow, a flashback... sending the kids off to camp eons
    ago; having them come back claiming that they were still
    on the second roll, and it was lasting a real long time.
    Took hundreds of pictures, and it still wasn't finished.
    By now you you'll have guessed that one of the leaders
    changed it, and it wasn't threaded onto the take up spool :(

    Don't think there's any camera that can be locked; but it
    might be a good idea - maybe Ron from Kodak is watching? :)

    Might try getting them involved in the hobby; have them
    learn a little themselves? Maybe be a nice hobby that
    you could all share together.

    Might try writing out step by step kindergarten level
    step by step instructions covering any problems they may
    encounter.

    Might tell them that experts aren't needed - or if one
    really, really is - see if they can't spot someone using
    a similar camera - at least the same manufacturer.
    If they're really getting on in years (as I am :)
    then maybe writing a note that they could show to
    their helper, telling him/her what they're trying to
    do, asking him/her to set it up that way for them.

    Might try an upgrade - where the smallest is at least
    greater than 640/480. Even twice that makes nice 4x6's.

    Just thinking....

    Take care.

    Ken
     
    Ken Weitzel, Mar 5, 2005
    #2
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  3. Ken Oaf

    Stacey Guest

    Ken Weitzel wrote:


    >
    > Might try writing out step by step kindergarten level
    > step by step instructions covering any problems they may
    > encounter.
    >


    You don't have elderly parents do you? :)

    This is why I got my mom a stylus with the fixed 35mm f2.8 lens. There is
    only one button on it!

    --

    Stacey
     
    Stacey, Mar 5, 2005
    #3
  4. Ken Oaf

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Ken Oaf wrote:
    > My elderly parents have just returned from a holiday on which they took one of
    > my Olympus digital cameras along with a film camera.
    >
    > I gave them specific instructions not to touch the settings, just turn it on and
    > take the photos. When the card is full, remove it and put another one in.
    >
    > They filled the first card, put the second one in then a self proclaimed expert
    > told them all memory cards must be formatted prior to use and offered to do it.
    >
    > The silly bugger managed to reset the camera, which reverted to the lowest
    > quality images (640x480) meaning the pictures are too small to print.
    >
    > My question is...
    >
    > Is there a fiddle proof digital camera that can have the settings locked such
    > that so-called experts can't stuff things up?
    >
    >

    Sure. You can buy 'one-use' cameras at CVS pharmacy. Perhaps, if your
    parents can't learn to use a more complex camera, a simple, disposable,
    film camera would be the best choice, or the aforementioned 'digital'.


    --
    Ron Hunter
     
    Ron Hunter, Mar 6, 2005
    #4
  5. Ken Oaf

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Ken Weitzel wrote:
    >
    >
    > Ken Oaf wrote:
    >
    >> My elderly parents have just returned from a holiday on which they
    >> took one of
    >> my Olympus digital cameras along with a film camera.
    >>
    >> I gave them specific instructions not to touch the settings, just turn
    >> it on and
    >> take the photos. When the card is full, remove it and put another one
    >> in.
    >>
    >> They filled the first card, put the second one in then a self
    >> proclaimed expert
    >> told them all memory cards must be formatted prior to use and offered
    >> to do it.
    >>
    >> The silly bugger managed to reset the camera, which reverted to the
    >> lowest
    >> quality images (640x480) meaning the pictures are too small to print.
    >>
    >> My question is...
    >>
    >> Is there a fiddle proof digital camera that can have the settings
    >> locked such
    >> that so-called experts can't stuff things up?

    >
    >
    > Hi...
    >
    > Wow, a flashback... sending the kids off to camp eons
    > ago; having them come back claiming that they were still
    > on the second roll, and it was lasting a real long time.
    > Took hundreds of pictures, and it still wasn't finished.
    > By now you you'll have guessed that one of the leaders
    > changed it, and it wasn't threaded onto the take up spool :(
    >
    > Don't think there's any camera that can be locked; but it
    > might be a good idea - maybe Ron from Kodak is watching? :)
    >
    > Might try getting them involved in the hobby; have them
    > learn a little themselves? Maybe be a nice hobby that
    > you could all share together.
    >
    > Might try writing out step by step kindergarten level
    > step by step instructions covering any problems they may
    > encounter.
    >
    > Might tell them that experts aren't needed - or if one
    > really, really is - see if they can't spot someone using
    > a similar camera - at least the same manufacturer.
    > If they're really getting on in years (as I am :)
    > then maybe writing a note that they could show to
    > their helper, telling him/her what they're trying to
    > do, asking him/her to set it up that way for them.
    >
    > Might try an upgrade - where the smallest is at least
    > greater than 640/480. Even twice that makes nice 4x6's.
    >
    > Just thinking....
    >
    > Take care.
    >
    > Ken
    >

    Unless a person is seriously into late stage of dementia, they should be
    capable of LEARNING to use a digital camera. Usually the problem is
    more lack of 'want to', than 'can do'. In these cases, something with
    which they are more comfortable is probably better.


    --
    Ron Hunter
     
    Ron Hunter, Mar 6, 2005
    #5
  6. I suspect other than encasing the camera in plastic, no such camera
    exists. If someone is going to "fiddle" with the camera, the options
    are going to be available to alter. I think you have to train your
    parents not to allow others to "fiddle" with their camera!

    Art

    Ken Oaf wrote:

    > My elderly parents have just returned from a holiday on which they took one of
    > my Olympus digital cameras along with a film camera.
    >
    > I gave them specific instructions not to touch the settings, just turn it on and
    > take the photos. When the card is full, remove it and put another one in.
    >
    > They filled the first card, put the second one in then a self proclaimed expert
    > told them all memory cards must be formatted prior to use and offered to do it.
    >
    > The silly bugger managed to reset the camera, which reverted to the lowest
    > quality images (640x480) meaning the pictures are too small to print.
    >
    > My question is...
    >
    > Is there a fiddle proof digital camera that can have the settings locked such
    > that so-called experts can't stuff things up?
    >
    >
     
    Arthur Entlich, Mar 6, 2005
    #6
  7. Ken Oaf

    MaryL Guest

    "Ron Hunter" <> wrote in message
    news:aAzWd.8953$...
    > Ken Weitzel wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> Ken Oaf wrote:
    >>
    >>> My elderly parents have just returned from a holiday on which they took
    >>> one of
    >>> my Olympus digital cameras along with a film camera.
    >>>
    >>> I gave them specific instructions not to touch the settings, just turn
    >>> it on and
    >>> take the photos. When the card is full, remove it and put another one
    >>> in.
    >>>
    >>> They filled the first card, put the second one in then a self proclaimed
    >>> expert
    >>> told them all memory cards must be formatted prior to use and offered to
    >>> do it.
    >>>
    >>> The silly bugger managed to reset the camera, which reverted to the
    >>> lowest
    >>> quality images (640x480) meaning the pictures are too small to print.
    >>>
    >>> My question is...
    >>>
    >>> Is there a fiddle proof digital camera that can have the settings locked
    >>> such
    >>> that so-called experts can't stuff things up?

    >>
    >>
    >> Hi...
    >>
    >> Wow, a flashback... sending the kids off to camp eons
    >> ago; having them come back claiming that they were still
    >> on the second roll, and it was lasting a real long time.
    >> Took hundreds of pictures, and it still wasn't finished.
    >> By now you you'll have guessed that one of the leaders
    >> changed it, and it wasn't threaded onto the take up spool :(
    >>
    >> Don't think there's any camera that can be locked; but it
    >> might be a good idea - maybe Ron from Kodak is watching? :)
    >>
    >> Might try getting them involved in the hobby; have them
    >> learn a little themselves? Maybe be a nice hobby that
    >> you could all share together.
    >>
    >> Might try writing out step by step kindergarten level
    >> step by step instructions covering any problems they may
    >> encounter.
    >>
    >> Might tell them that experts aren't needed - or if one
    >> really, really is - see if they can't spot someone using
    >> a similar camera - at least the same manufacturer.
    >> If they're really getting on in years (as I am :)
    >> then maybe writing a note that they could show to
    >> their helper, telling him/her what they're trying to
    >> do, asking him/her to set it up that way for them.
    >>
    >> Might try an upgrade - where the smallest is at least
    >> greater than 640/480. Even twice that makes nice 4x6's.
    >>
    >> Just thinking....
    >>
    >> Take care.
    >>
    >> Ken
    >>

    > Unless a person is seriously into late stage of dementia, they should be
    > capable of LEARNING to use a digital camera. Usually the problem is more
    > lack of 'want to', than 'can do'. In these cases, something with which
    > they are more comfortable is probably better.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Ron Hunter


    Not necessarily. My mother was never able to master anything on the VCR
    beyond pushing the "up and down arrows." The same thing is true of cameras.
    She would become utterly frustrated and immediately give up if she had to do
    anything other than point and shoot (with a single press of a button). She
    is now old enough that your comments ring true, but this was *always* true
    of her.

    MaryL
     
    MaryL, Mar 6, 2005
    #7
  8. Ken Oaf

    Ron Hunter Guest

    MaryL wrote:
    > "Ron Hunter" <> wrote in message
    > news:aAzWd.8953$...
    >
    >>Ken Weitzel wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Ken Oaf wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>My elderly parents have just returned from a holiday on which they took
    >>>>one of
    >>>>my Olympus digital cameras along with a film camera.
    >>>>
    >>>>I gave them specific instructions not to touch the settings, just turn
    >>>>it on and
    >>>>take the photos. When the card is full, remove it and put another one
    >>>>in.
    >>>>
    >>>>They filled the first card, put the second one in then a self proclaimed
    >>>>expert
    >>>>told them all memory cards must be formatted prior to use and offered to
    >>>>do it.
    >>>>
    >>>>The silly bugger managed to reset the camera, which reverted to the
    >>>>lowest
    >>>>quality images (640x480) meaning the pictures are too small to print.
    >>>>
    >>>>My question is...
    >>>>
    >>>>Is there a fiddle proof digital camera that can have the settings locked
    >>>>such
    >>>>that so-called experts can't stuff things up?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Hi...
    >>>
    >>>Wow, a flashback... sending the kids off to camp eons
    >>>ago; having them come back claiming that they were still
    >>>on the second roll, and it was lasting a real long time.
    >>>Took hundreds of pictures, and it still wasn't finished.
    >>>By now you you'll have guessed that one of the leaders
    >>>changed it, and it wasn't threaded onto the take up spool :(
    >>>
    >>>Don't think there's any camera that can be locked; but it
    >>>might be a good idea - maybe Ron from Kodak is watching? :)
    >>>
    >>>Might try getting them involved in the hobby; have them
    >>>learn a little themselves? Maybe be a nice hobby that
    >>>you could all share together.
    >>>
    >>>Might try writing out step by step kindergarten level
    >>>step by step instructions covering any problems they may
    >>>encounter.
    >>>
    >>>Might tell them that experts aren't needed - or if one
    >>>really, really is - see if they can't spot someone using
    >>>a similar camera - at least the same manufacturer.
    >>>If they're really getting on in years (as I am :)
    >>>then maybe writing a note that they could show to
    >>>their helper, telling him/her what they're trying to
    >>>do, asking him/her to set it up that way for them.
    >>>
    >>>Might try an upgrade - where the smallest is at least
    >>>greater than 640/480. Even twice that makes nice 4x6's.
    >>>
    >>>Just thinking....
    >>>
    >>>Take care.
    >>>
    >>>Ken
    >>>

    >>
    >>Unless a person is seriously into late stage of dementia, they should be
    >>capable of LEARNING to use a digital camera. Usually the problem is more
    >>lack of 'want to', than 'can do'. In these cases, something with which
    >>they are more comfortable is probably better.
    >>
    >>
    >>--
    >>Ron Hunter

    >
    >
    > Not necessarily. My mother was never able to master anything on the VCR
    > beyond pushing the "up and down arrows." The same thing is true of cameras.
    > She would become utterly frustrated and immediately give up if she had to do
    > anything other than point and shoot (with a single press of a button). She
    > is now old enough that your comments ring true, but this was *always* true
    > of her.
    >
    > MaryL
    >
    >

    I have always wondered why some people get to the point where they
    aren't willing to learn something new. I hope if I reach that point
    someone will have the sense to bury me before I stink up the place. It
    just isn't my nature to NOT want to learn something, but I have a
    brother who has reached that point. I feel sorry for him. It isn't
    because he can't, he just doesn't want to learn anything else.
    And I am not exactly young any more, either.


    --
    Ron Hunter
     
    Ron Hunter, Mar 6, 2005
    #8
  9. Ken Oaf

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Arthur Entlich wrote:
    > I suspect other than encasing the camera in plastic, no such camera
    > exists. If someone is going to "fiddle" with the camera, the options
    > are going to be available to alter. I think you have to train your
    > parents not to allow others to "fiddle" with their camera!
    >
    > Art
    >



    There are some base-line models from Kodak, at least, that have a
    shutter button,

    and that's it.



    --
    Ron Hunter
     
    Ron Hunter, Mar 6, 2005
    #9
  10. Ken Oaf

    MaryL Guest

    "Ron Hunter" <> wrote in message
    news:zTIWd.37566$...
    > MaryL wrote:
    >> "Ron Hunter" <> wrote in message
    >> news:aAzWd.8953$...
    >>
    >>>Ken Weitzel wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Ken Oaf wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>My elderly parents have just returned from a holiday on which they took
    >>>>>one of
    >>>>>my Olympus digital cameras along with a film camera.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I gave them specific instructions not to touch the settings, just turn
    >>>>>it on and
    >>>>>take the photos. When the card is full, remove it and put another one
    >>>>>in.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>They filled the first card, put the second one in then a self
    >>>>>proclaimed expert
    >>>>>told them all memory cards must be formatted prior to use and offered
    >>>>>to do it.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The silly bugger managed to reset the camera, which reverted to the
    >>>>>lowest
    >>>>>quality images (640x480) meaning the pictures are too small to print.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>My question is...
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Is there a fiddle proof digital camera that can have the settings
    >>>>>locked such
    >>>>>that so-called experts can't stuff things up?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Hi...
    >>>>
    >>>>Wow, a flashback... sending the kids off to camp eons
    >>>>ago; having them come back claiming that they were still
    >>>>on the second roll, and it was lasting a real long time.
    >>>>Took hundreds of pictures, and it still wasn't finished.
    >>>>By now you you'll have guessed that one of the leaders
    >>>>changed it, and it wasn't threaded onto the take up spool :(
    >>>>
    >>>>Don't think there's any camera that can be locked; but it
    >>>>might be a good idea - maybe Ron from Kodak is watching? :)
    >>>>
    >>>>Might try getting them involved in the hobby; have them
    >>>>learn a little themselves? Maybe be a nice hobby that
    >>>>you could all share together.
    >>>>
    >>>>Might try writing out step by step kindergarten level
    >>>>step by step instructions covering any problems they may
    >>>>encounter.
    >>>>
    >>>>Might tell them that experts aren't needed - or if one
    >>>>really, really is - see if they can't spot someone using
    >>>>a similar camera - at least the same manufacturer.
    >>>>If they're really getting on in years (as I am :)
    >>>>then maybe writing a note that they could show to
    >>>>their helper, telling him/her what they're trying to
    >>>>do, asking him/her to set it up that way for them.
    >>>>
    >>>>Might try an upgrade - where the smallest is at least
    >>>>greater than 640/480. Even twice that makes nice 4x6's.
    >>>>
    >>>>Just thinking....
    >>>>
    >>>>Take care.
    >>>>
    >>>>Ken
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>Unless a person is seriously into late stage of dementia, they should be
    >>>capable of LEARNING to use a digital camera. Usually the problem is more
    >>>lack of 'want to', than 'can do'. In these cases, something with which
    >>>they are more comfortable is probably better.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>--
    >>>Ron Hunter

    >>
    >>
    >> Not necessarily. My mother was never able to master anything on the VCR
    >> beyond pushing the "up and down arrows." The same thing is true of
    >> cameras. She would become utterly frustrated and immediately give up if
    >> she had to do anything other than point and shoot (with a single press of
    >> a button). She is now old enough that your comments ring true, but this
    >> was *always* true of her.
    >>
    >> MaryL

    > I have always wondered why some people get to the point where they aren't
    > willing to learn something new. I hope if I reach that point someone will
    > have the sense to bury me before I stink up the place. It just isn't my
    > nature to NOT want to learn something, but I have a brother who has
    > reached that point. I feel sorry for him. It isn't because he can't, he
    > just doesn't want to learn anything else.
    > And I am not exactly young any more, either.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Ron Hunter


    Partly, I think it rests with the person's areas of interest. My mother
    simply didn't have any interest in taking the time it would take to learn
    about *any* type of electronic equipment. On the other hand, she grew up on
    a farm and knew more than most of the men in the area concerning farm
    equipment (and how to repair it). By contrast, I have a great deal of
    interest in computers and was a "camera bug" back in the days when I had a
    Kodak Retina Reflex 35mm camera (including one with a hand-held light
    meter) -- but I know next-to-nothing about using or repairing farm
    machinery.

    MaryL
     
    MaryL, Mar 6, 2005
    #10
  11. Ken Oaf

    Ron Baird Guest

    Greetings Ken,

    I am not aware of any locking cameras, and am sorry to hear that your
    parents lost or now only have images that can be viewed. I suspect that you
    may be able to get OK prints (4x6) from those files. Try visiting the Ofoto
    site; if you are not a member you can get 10 free prints. Pick those that
    you feel are the best and see if the resulting prints from the files in
    question are acceptable. If they are you can get more. Otherwise, it will
    not cost your parents anything. Can do this over the web.

    http://www.ofoto.com

    Talk to you soon. I will move this along to others as it does make sense
    and Kodak wants to know of such situations, Kodak related or not.

    Talk to you soon,

    Ron Baird
    Eastman Kodak Company




    >
    > Ken Oaf wrote:
    > > My elderly parents have just returned from a holiday on which they took

    one of
    > > my Olympus digital cameras along with a film camera.
    > >
    > > I gave them specific instructions not to touch the settings, just turn

    it on and
    > > take the photos. When the card is full, remove it and put another one

    in.
    > >
    > > They filled the first card, put the second one in then a self proclaimed

    expert
    > > told them all memory cards must be formatted prior to use and offered to

    do it.
    > >
    > > The silly bugger managed to reset the camera, which reverted to the

    lowest
    > > quality images (640x480) meaning the pictures are too small to print.
    > >
    > > My question is...
    > >
    > > Is there a fiddle proof digital camera that can have the settings locked

    such
    > > that so-called experts can't stuff things up?

    >
     
    Ron Baird, Mar 7, 2005
    #11
  12. Ken Oaf

    MaryL Guest

    Ron, since you work for Kodak, you may be interested in knowing that I still
    have two very old Kodak 35mm cameras -- an Anastigmat Special f3.5 50mm
    E046431 that I used with a hand-held meter and a Retina Reflex with built-in
    meter (a "marvel" to me at that time). I kept them because -- despite their
    age -- they took the most marvellous pictures. If I remember correctly, my
    father got one of them during the WWII era and he probably got the Retina
    Reflex in the 1950s (or possibly even as early as the late 1940s). I even
    kept the Soligor MK-7 that he bought for one of the cameras. Brings back
    great memories!

    MaryL


    "Ron Baird" <> wrote in message
    news:d0i3sn$t7t$...
    > Greetings Ken,
    >
    > I am not aware of any locking cameras, and am sorry to hear that your
    > parents lost or now only have images that can be viewed. I suspect that
    > you
    > may be able to get OK prints (4x6) from those files. Try visiting the
    > Ofoto
    > site; if you are not a member you can get 10 free prints. Pick those that
    > you feel are the best and see if the resulting prints from the files in
    > question are acceptable. If they are you can get more. Otherwise, it
    > will
    > not cost your parents anything. Can do this over the web.
    >
    > http://www.ofoto.com
    >
    > Talk to you soon. I will move this along to others as it does make sense
    > and Kodak wants to know of such situations, Kodak related or not.
    >
    > Talk to you soon,
    >
    > Ron Baird
    > Eastman Kodak Company
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>
    >> Ken Oaf wrote:
    >> > My elderly parents have just returned from a holiday on which they took

    > one of
    >> > my Olympus digital cameras along with a film camera.
    >> >
    >> > I gave them specific instructions not to touch the settings, just turn

    > it on and
    >> > take the photos. When the card is full, remove it and put another one

    > in.
    >> >
    >> > They filled the first card, put the second one in then a self
    >> > proclaimed

    > expert
    >> > told them all memory cards must be formatted prior to use and offered
    >> > to

    > do it.
    >> >
    >> > The silly bugger managed to reset the camera, which reverted to the

    > lowest
    >> > quality images (640x480) meaning the pictures are too small to print.
    >> >
    >> > My question is...
    >> >
    >> > Is there a fiddle proof digital camera that can have the settings
    >> > locked

    > such
    >> > that so-called experts can't stuff things up?

    >>

    >
    >
     
    MaryL, Mar 7, 2005
    #12
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