Nikon celebrates 50 years of F mount lens system

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by Glass Bread, Mar 8, 2009.

  1. Glass Bread

    Glass Bread Guest

    Glass Bread, Mar 8, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Glass Bread

    Colin.D Guest

    Glass Bread wrote:
    > Nikon is celebrating 50 years of F Mount this week:
    >
    > http://giraffitti.wordpress.com/200...-50-years-of-an-unchanging-lens-mount-system/


    Nikon is trying to make a virtue out of what is really their Achilles
    heel - a hodge-podge of lenses and bodies that have limitations. Some
    bodies don't focus with some lenses; some bodies don't meter with some
    lenses, some lenses jam if they are mated to some bodies without mods to
    the mount.

    They're trying to score off Canon, who bit the bullet and designed a
    proper modern mount, able to accommodate larger rear elements, and
    provide full operation - focus, metering, aperture - with every EOS EF
    lens made, and several EF-S lenses for cropped-sensor cameras, in
    addition to those cameras accepting all EF lenses as well.

    There are the diehards who claim that Canon abandoned their FD mount,
    rendering FD lenses nearly worthless. It did not stop those who
    continued to use their FD cameras, only those who migrated to the new
    EOS system cameras, and it was all 25 YEARS ago, a quarter century!
    There are many pro photogs using EOS cameras today who weren't born when
    the change was made.

    Nikon is flogging a dead horse here.

    Colin D.
     
    Colin.D, Mar 8, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Glass Bread

    Colin.D Guest

    Floyd L. Davidson wrote:
    > "Colin.D" <> wrote:
    >> Glass Bread wrote:
    >>> Nikon is celebrating 50 years of F Mount this week:
    >>> http://giraffitti.wordpress.com/200...-50-years-of-an-unchanging-lens-mount-system/

    >> Nikon is trying to make a virtue out of what is really their Achilles
    >> heel - a hodge-podge of lenses and bodies that have limitations. Some
    >> bodies don't focus with some lenses; some bodies don't meter with some
    >> lenses, some lenses jam if they are mated to some bodies without mods to
    >> the mount.
    >>
    >> They're trying to score off Canon, who bit the bullet and designed a
    >> proper modern mount, able to accommodate larger rear elements, and
    >> provide full operation - focus, metering, aperture - with every EOS EF
    >> lens made, and several EF-S lenses for cropped-sensor cameras, in
    >> addition to those cameras accepting all EF lenses as well.
    >>
    >> There are the diehards who claim that Canon abandoned their FD mount,
    >> rendering FD lenses nearly worthless. It did not stop those who
    >> continued to use their FD cameras, only those who migrated to the new
    >> EOS system cameras, and it was all 25 YEARS ago, a quarter century!
    >> There are many pro photogs using EOS cameras today who weren't born when
    >> the change was made.
    >>
    >> Nikon is flogging a dead horse here.

    >
    > You abuse Nikon because a consumer grade camera won't
    > work as well as a pro modle will with one of their
    > 1970's lenses... but say that Canon's inability to use
    > *any* of their 1970 lenses with *any* of their current
    > cameras means nothing...
    >
    > So just who is flogging what?
    >

    Aaahh, Floyd, how many people buy a pro Nikon versus those who buy the
    entry grades?. The entry models, and some pro-sumer versions do suffer
    from the limitations I outlined above. For those, lenses can be a
    problem. You suggest the way out is to buy a D700 or D3x with a
    (mostly) unused focus motor in the body, at multi-thousand dollar
    prices? For amateurs and hobbyists?

    Every Canon EOS camera made, from the humble 300D right up to the latest
    5DII and the 1D variants can fully use all EF lenses, no limitation.
    That advantage alone is worth the mount change.

    Nikon painted themselves into a corner by not grasping the nettle and
    updating their mount, thereby dooming their system to kludges and lost
    capability with many body/lens combinations, not to mention future lens
    design.

    Canon foresaw the huge advantages possible with the application of
    electronics to camera functions, even before digital cameras were
    envisaged, and bit the bullet by changing the mount right at the start,
    setting their cameras and lenses up for unfettered future development.

    Whatever one may think of the actual cameras from both stables, the
    Canon mount change was far-sighted indeed. In modern speak, the death
    of the FD mount and its lenses could be called 'collateral damage',
    justified by the advantages of the EOS mount - which, by the way, still
    has much room for future development, squeezing the Nikon mount design
    even further.

    As I said, Nikon are trying to make a virtue out of a design mistake
    made 25 years ago. Their new cameras are like a modern car, all mod
    cons, power steering, active suspension, the works - and powering the
    vehicle with a 1950's carburetted Ford flathead V8.

    Colin D.
     
    Colin.D, Mar 8, 2009
    #3
  4. Glass Bread

    Peter Guest

    "Colin.D" <> wrote in message
    news:gp01bh$qmk$...
    > Glass Bread wrote:
    >> Nikon is celebrating 50 years of F Mount this week:
    >>
    >> http://giraffitti.wordpress.com/200...-50-years-of-an-unchanging-lens-mount-system/

    >
    > Nikon is trying to make a virtue out of what is really their Achilles
    > heel - a hodge-podge of lenses and bodies that have limitations. Some
    > bodies don't focus with some lenses; some bodies don't meter with some
    > lenses, some lenses jam if they are mated to some bodies without mods to
    > the mount.
    >
    > They're trying to score off Canon, who bit the bullet and designed a
    > proper modern mount, able to accommodate larger rear elements, and provide
    > full operation - focus, metering, aperture - with every EOS EF lens made,
    > and several EF-S lenses for cropped-sensor cameras, in addition to those
    > cameras accepting all EF lenses as well.
    >
    > There are the diehards who claim that Canon abandoned their FD mount,
    > rendering FD lenses nearly worthless. It did not stop those who continued
    > to use their FD cameras, only those who migrated to the new EOS system
    > cameras, and it was all 25 YEARS ago, a quarter century! There are many
    > pro photogs using EOS cameras today who weren't born when the change was
    > made.
    >
    > Nikon is flogging a dead horse here.
    >



    All I know is that my old 200 micro, ai converted 24 f2.8 and 50 1.4 work
    as well as they did on my Nikkormat and F3. I will not go further in you
    holy war.

    --
    Peter
     
    Peter, Mar 8, 2009
    #4
  5. Glass Bread

    Paul Furman Guest

    Colin.D wrote:
    >
    > Nikon painted themselves into a corner by not grasping the nettle


    <chuckle>
     
    Paul Furman, Mar 8, 2009
    #5
  6. Glass Bread

    dj_nme Guest

    Paul Furman wrote:
    > Colin.D wrote:
    >>
    >> Nikon painted themselves into a corner by not grasping the nettle

    >
    > <chuckle>


    It's interesting to actually look at three of the pre AF lens mounts.
    Nikon F mount: simple bayonet mount with a locking pin and release
    button on the camera body.
    Canon FD: with it's reverse bayonet (male body, female lens), the
    locking mechanism is a turning ring on the breach end of the lens.
    Pentax K: Essentially the same as Nikon: just a slightly different
    design with the "teeth" on the bayonet and position of the locking pin.
    Olympus OM: Similar again to Nikon and Pentax, except that the locking
    pin and release button are built into the breach end of the lens.
    Nikon F, Pentax K, Olympus OM all have a flat mating ring surface all
    around the actual bayonet.

    To make an AF mount out of Nikon F, Pentax K, Olympus OM all that was
    required was to add a screw drive pin to the lens mount on the mating
    ring surface and that's about it.
    The body can control the aperture in exactly the same way as the manual
    focus cameras.
    Canon FD has no mating ring surface around the bayonet, so there's
    nowhere to put a screw drive pin and so it is apparent that their
    designers were forced to start again.
    Thus EF mount was created.
     
    dj_nme, Mar 9, 2009
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Brion K. Lienhart

    T-Mount adapter for Olympus 4/3 system?

    Brion K. Lienhart, Jun 24, 2006, in forum: Olympus
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    430
    Brion K. Lienhart
    Jun 27, 2006
  2. Sam Graham

    M42-mount System

    Sam Graham, Jan 5, 2004, in forum: 35mm Cameras
    Replies:
    102
    Views:
    1,550
    Dallas
    Jan 12, 2004
  3. Theo
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    1,725
    Jeremy
    Dec 4, 2004
  4. Replies:
    0
    Views:
    398
  5. mindspring
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    983
    mindspring
    May 1, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page