Nikon PB-6 Bellows

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by Paul Furman, May 16, 2007.

  1. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Who was it who had the page about compatibility of old bellows with
    newer cameras? One page I found described the PB-6 as having aperture
    coupling so that means it can stop down AI lenses as well as open up G
    lenses for focusing? Will I need an extension ring to mount it on a
    D200? Is it strong enough to hold a big heavy lens? One review described
    this model as notoriously wobbly. Does the PB-6 have swing & shift?

    Here's a page with a decent summary of various bellows:
    <http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/michaeliu/cameras/shared/ff2macro/ff2bellow.htm>
    PB-6 Bellows
    A twist of the knob lets you vary the lens extension at will, producing
    frame-filling images of the most minute subjects. Provides continuously
    variable extension from 48mm to 208mm. For motorized bodies or newer
    built in AF cameras, the Bellows Spacer PB-6D enables moving a Nikon F5,
    F4E, F4s or F3 with MD-4 on the PB-6 rail without interference. * Note:
    An Auto Extension Ring is required when the PB-6 is used with the F5.

    Thanks,

    --
    Paul Furman Photography
    http://www.edgehill.net/1
    Bay Natives Nursery
    http://www.baynatives.com
     
    Paul Furman, May 16, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Paul Furman

    Matt Clara Guest

    "Paul Furman" <> wrote in message
    news:itK2i.29116$...
    > Who was it who had the page about compatibility of old bellows with newer
    > cameras? One page I found described the PB-6 as having aperture coupling
    > so that means it can stop down AI lenses as well as open up G lenses for
    > focusing? Will I need an extension ring to mount it on a D200? Is it
    > strong enough to hold a big heavy lens? One review described this model as
    > notoriously wobbly. Does the PB-6 have swing & shift?
    >
    > Here's a page with a decent summary of various bellows:
    > <http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/michaeliu/cameras/shared/ff2macro/ff2bellow.htm>
    > PB-6 Bellows
    > A twist of the knob lets you vary the lens extension at will, producing
    > frame-filling images of the most minute subjects. Provides continuously
    > variable extension from 48mm to 208mm. For motorized bodies or newer built
    > in AF cameras, the Bellows Spacer PB-6D enables moving a Nikon F5, F4E,
    > F4s or F3 with MD-4 on the PB-6 rail without interference. * Note: An Auto
    > Extension Ring is required when the PB-6 is used with the F5.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >


    That was me, though it doesn't cover the PB-6. No, you won't need an
    extension ring for the D200 unless you have the battery pack on it
    (MB-200?), it's strong enough for anything up to a 70-200 f2.8 (though why
    you'd want to use one of those, I don't know, but I did try mine on a PB-5,
    and it worked). I believe only the PB-4 has swings and shifts, though I
    could be wrong. These bellows are great fun. I hope to aquire a PB-4 here,
    eventually.

    --
    www.mattclara.com
     
    Matt Clara, May 16, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Matt Clara wrote:
    > "Paul Furman" <> wrote in message
    > news:itK2i.29116$...
    >
    >>Who was it who had the page about compatibility of old bellows with newer
    >>cameras? One page I found described the PB-6 as having aperture coupling
    >>so that means it can stop down AI lenses as well as open up G lenses for
    >>focusing? Will I need an extension ring to mount it on a D200? Is it
    >>strong enough to hold a big heavy lens? One review described this model as
    >>notoriously wobbly. Does the PB-6 have swing & shift?
    >>
    >>Here's a page with a decent summary of various bellows:
    >><http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/michaeliu/cameras/shared/ff2macro/ff2bellow.htm>
    >>PB-6 Bellows
    >>A twist of the knob lets you vary the lens extension at will, producing
    >>frame-filling images of the most minute subjects. Provides continuously
    >>variable extension from 48mm to 208mm. For motorized bodies or newer built
    >>in AF cameras, the Bellows Spacer PB-6D enables moving a Nikon F5, F4E,
    >>F4s or F3 with MD-4 on the PB-6 rail without interference. * Note: An Auto
    >>Extension Ring is required when the PB-6 is used with the F5.

    >
    > That was me, though it doesn't cover the PB-6. No, you won't need an
    > extension ring for the D200 unless you have the battery pack on it
    > (MB-200?), it's strong enough for anything up to a 70-200 f2.8 (though why
    > you'd want to use one of those, I don't know, but I did try mine on a PB-5,
    > and it worked). I believe only the PB-4 has swings and shifts, though I
    > could be wrong. These bellows are great fun. I hope to aquire a PB-4 here,
    > eventually.
    >
    > --
    > www.mattclara.com


    Cool... but... where is that page?
    So yes, it'll control aperture on G lenses?

    I would like to try the 300mm f/2.8 for hand held bee, butterfly &
    dragonfly closeups that fill the frame... maybe entirely impractical?
    They run away from 200mm & the +2 diopter closeup lens degrades image
    quality.

    To be of any use on a tripod, I'll need a much sturdier tripod but the
    rig I'm looking at has a slide holder which I could use to hold little
    flowers & such... and duplicate my old slides. I suspect I'll need a
    special bellows lens for that configuration though, my 105 macro lens is
    awfully long.

    --
    Paul Furman Photography
    http://www.edgehill.net/1
    Bay Natives Nursery
    http://www.baynatives.com
     
    Paul Furman, May 16, 2007
    #3
  4. Paul Furman

    Matt Clara Guest

    "Paul Furman" <> wrote in message
    news:zhL2i.8337$...
    > Matt Clara wrote:
    >> "Paul Furman" <> wrote in message
    >> news:itK2i.29116$...
    >>
    >>>Who was it who had the page about compatibility of old bellows with newer
    >>>cameras? One page I found described the PB-6 as having aperture coupling
    >>>so that means it can stop down AI lenses as well as open up G lenses for
    >>>focusing? Will I need an extension ring to mount it on a D200? Is it
    >>>strong enough to hold a big heavy lens? One review described this model
    >>>as notoriously wobbly. Does the PB-6 have swing & shift?
    >>>
    >>>Here's a page with a decent summary of various bellows:
    >>><http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/michaeliu/cameras/shared/ff2macro/ff2bellow.htm>
    >>>PB-6 Bellows
    >>>A twist of the knob lets you vary the lens extension at will, producing
    >>>frame-filling images of the most minute subjects. Provides continuously
    >>>variable extension from 48mm to 208mm. For motorized bodies or newer
    >>>built in AF cameras, the Bellows Spacer PB-6D enables moving a Nikon F5,
    >>>F4E, F4s or F3 with MD-4 on the PB-6 rail without interference. * Note:
    >>>An Auto Extension Ring is required when the PB-6 is used with the F5.

    >>
    >> That was me, though it doesn't cover the PB-6. No, you won't need an
    >> extension ring for the D200 unless you have the battery pack on it
    >> (MB-200?), it's strong enough for anything up to a 70-200 f2.8 (though
    >> why you'd want to use one of those, I don't know, but I did try mine on a
    >> PB-5, and it worked). I believe only the PB-4 has swings and shifts,
    >> though I could be wrong. These bellows are great fun. I hope to aquire
    >> a PB-4 here, eventually.
    >>

    >
    > Cool... but... where is that page?


    http://www.mattclara.com/misc/nikonbellows/

    > So yes, it'll control aperture on G lenses?


    That I don't know; however, considering the PB-6 is older than G lenses, I
    doubt it (I'd certainly check with Nikon before I bet the bank on it).

    >
    > I would like to try the 300mm f/2.8 for hand held bee, butterfly &
    > dragonfly closeups that fill the frame... maybe entirely impractical? They
    > run away from 200mm & the +2 diopter closeup lens degrades image quality.
    >


    If you could pull that off, you could be a professional athlete of the first
    magnitude! No way you can handhold a bellows setup. I've used mine with a
    beanbag, and that came out ok, though you really need two bean bags, one for
    the bellows and one for the camera. Annika1980 has gotten some nice images
    such as you describe using a 400mm f5.6 on a 20D with a monopod--manual
    focus, no less...

    --
    www.mattclara.com
     
    Matt Clara, May 16, 2007
    #4
  5. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Matt Clara wrote:
    >Paul Furman wrote
    >>Matt Clara wrote:
    >>>Paul Furman wrote
    >>>
    >>>>Who was it who had the page about compatibility of old bellows with newer
    >>>>cameras? One page I found described the PB-6 as having aperture coupling
    >>>>so that means it can stop down AI lenses as well as open up G lenses for
    >>>>focusing? Will I need an extension ring to mount it on a D200? Is it
    >>>>strong enough to hold a big heavy lens? One review described this model
    >>>>as notoriously wobbly. Does the PB-6 have swing & shift?
    >>>>
    >>>>Here's a page with a decent summary of various bellows:
    >>>><http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/michaeliu/cameras/shared/ff2macro/ff2bellow.htm>
    >>>>PB-6 Bellows
    >>>>A twist of the knob lets you vary the lens extension at will, producing
    >>>>frame-filling images of the most minute subjects. Provides continuously
    >>>>variable extension from 48mm to 208mm. For motorized bodies or newer
    >>>>built in AF cameras, the Bellows Spacer PB-6D enables moving a Nikon F5,
    >>>>F4E, F4s or F3 with MD-4 on the PB-6 rail without interference. * Note:
    >>>>An Auto Extension Ring is required when the PB-6 is used with the F5.
    >>>
    >>>That was me, though it doesn't cover the PB-6. No, you won't need an
    >>>extension ring for the D200 unless you have the battery pack on it
    >>>(MB-200?), it's strong enough for anything up to a 70-200 f2.8 (though
    >>>why you'd want to use one of those, I don't know, but I did try mine on a
    >>>PB-5, and it worked). I believe only the PB-4 has swings and shifts,
    >>>though I could be wrong. These bellows are great fun. I hope to aquire
    >>>a PB-4 here, eventually.

    >>
    >>Cool... but... where is that page?

    >
    > http://www.mattclara.com/misc/nikonbellows/
    >
    >>So yes, it'll control aperture on G lenses?

    >
    > That I don't know; however, considering the PB-6 is older than G lenses, I
    > doubt it (I'd certainly check with Nikon before I bet the bank on it).


    Following the links on your page I found this:
    <http://support.nikontech.com/cgi-bin/nikonusa.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=900&p_created=1050073583&p_sid=Z6z3HLBi&p_accessibility=0&p_lva=&p_sp=cF9zcmNoPTEmcF9zb3J0X2J5PSZwX2dyaWRzb3J0PSZwX3Jvd19jbnQ9NCZwX3Byb2RzPTAmcF9jYXRzPTAmcF9wdj0mcF9jdj0mcF9zZWFyY2hfdHlwZT1hbnN3ZXJzLnNlYXJjaF9ubCZwX3BhZ2U9MSZwX3NlYXJjaF90ZXh0PXBiLTYgYmVsbG93cw**&p_li=&p_topview=1>
    "For full exposure control the preferred lens will be a Nikkor lens with
    an aperture ring. The G-type lens does not provide aperture control for
    this application."

    :-(

    I did also find out about a coupling cable device that allows stopping
    down:
    <http://www.nikonians.org/html/resources/nikon_articles/other/close-up_macro/macro_images/F3_PB6_55.jpg>
    <http://www.nikonians.org/html/resources/nikon_articles/other/close-up_macro/macro_8b.html>
    "With the plunger-assist automatic aperture control lever activated, the
    bellows work just like a normal camera body with the little aperture
    control lever on the lens mount holding the aperture blades wide open.
    This lever is release only when the shutter is triggered, activating the
    mechanical plunger on the bellows column to automatically stop-down the
    aperture blades to the pre-set aperture settings"

    .... but they end up concluding that the double cable stop-down doo-hicky
    just introduces camera shake & better to stop down manually...

    "If only one single cable release is available for the camera body only,
    the aperture control on the bellow’s column must be disengaged by means
    of the manual lock provided on it. In such a situation, the aperture
    should be left wide open (i.e. smallest available f/stop number) during
    focusing and composition to allow the brightest possible view through
    the viewfinder. The aperture should then be stopped-down to the desired
    f/stop number prior the taking the shot."


    >>I would like to try the 300mm f/2.8 for hand held bee, butterfly &
    >>dragonfly closeups that fill the frame... maybe entirely impractical? They
    >>run away from 200mm & the +2 diopter closeup lens degrades image quality.

    >
    > If you could pull that off, you could be a professional athlete of the first
    > magnitude! No way you can handhold a bellows setup. I've used mine with a
    > beanbag, and that came out ok, though you really need two bean bags, one for
    > the bellows and one for the camera. Annika1980 has gotten some nice images
    > such as you describe using a 400mm f5.6 on a 20D with a monopod--manual
    > focus, no less...


    On a 300mm lens, a 50mm extension is not that extreme (I think) and even
    less with a 1.4 teleconverter (420mm f/4). It might just get me a little
    closer to these skittish creatures, I'm hoping. OTOH I did take a peek
    at John Shaw's Closeups in Nature and he suggests a short extension tube
    is more appropriate for what I'm talking about.

    Also, thanks to your page I got some answers about slide duplicating:
    http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=00H0Hy
    Which basically says I need an 80mm enlarging lens with a custom
    adapter... or the special "short-mount" 105 macro, which as best I can
    tell is what this rig was designed for. My 105 will get close enough to
    dupe slides, it's just a matter of a copy stand/focusing rail that's
    lacking.

    One disparaging review of the PB-6:
    http://www.imagepower.de/IMAGES/imgEQUIPMENT/PB6.htm

    More discussion of lens choices & diffraction:
    http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=000LX3
    (my 35mm f/2 AI might be useful reversed)

    Nikon specs:
    http://www.europe-nikon.com/product/en_GB/products/broad/277/overview.html
    Suitable lenses: 20mm - 200mm
    Bellows extension: 48mm - 208mm
    Support movement: 180mm



    --
    Paul Furman Photography
    http://www.edgehill.net/1
    Bay Natives Nursery
    http://www.baynatives.com
     
    Paul Furman, May 17, 2007
    #5
  6. Paul Furman <> wrote:
    >I would like to try the 300mm f/2.8 for hand held bee,
    >butterfly & dragonfly closeups that fill the
    >frame... maybe entirely impractical? They run away from
    >200mm & the +2 diopter closeup lens degrades image
    >quality.


    I would think a 300mm f/2.8 is going to be far too large
    to be supported by a bellows. Maybe an f/4 or an f/5.6
    at that focal length would work though.

    With the 200mm lense you might try an achromatic
    diopter, which will probably give better results.

    The Olympus MCON-35 is a +2.9 diopter that fits a 62mm
    thread. The Nikon #5T (+1.5 diopter) and #6T (+2.9
    diopter) also fit 62 mm threads. The Canon 500D +2.0
    diopters come in 77, 72, and 58mm threads.

    The Canon 500D diopters are the most expensive, but you
    can probably find one that does not require a
    step-up/down adapter to match your lens, and the larger
    one will certainly avoid any vignetting.

    I have an MCON-35 +2.9 diopter, but have never tried it
    on a 200mm lense. It does well in front of a 105mm
    macro though, and have tried that with a 2x telextender
    too. I'd expect a similar configuration with your 200mm
    to be better than hanging a 300mm f/2.8 lense off a
    bellows.

    >To be of any use on a tripod, I'll need a much sturdier
    >tripod but the rig I'm looking at has a slide holder
    >which I could use to hold little flowers & such... and
    >duplicate my old slides. I suspect I'll need a special
    >bellows lens for that configuration though, my 105 macro
    >lens is awfully long.


    Enlarging lenses work extremely well at the end of a
    bellows...

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, May 17, 2007
    #6
  7. In article <>,
    Floyd L. Davidson <> wrote:
    >Paul Furman <> wrote:
    >>I would like to try the 300mm f/2.8 for hand held bee,
    >>butterfly & dragonfly closeups that fill the
    >>frame... maybe entirely impractical? They run away from
    >>200mm & the +2 diopter closeup lens degrades image
    >>quality.

    >
    >I would think a 300mm f/2.8 is going to be far too large
    >to be supported by a bellows. Maybe an f/4 or an f/5.6
    >at that focal length would work though.


    I just played with a D1, PK-13, PB-4, 300/4.5 IF-ED and that seems to work
    quite well.


    --
    That was it. Done. The faulty Monk was turned out into the desert where it
    could believe what it liked, including the idea that it had been hard done
    by. It was allowed to keep its horse, since horses were so cheap to make.
    -- Douglas Adams in Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency
     
    Philip Homburg, May 17, 2007
    #7
  8. (Philip Homburg) wrote:
    >Floyd L. Davidson <> wrote:
    >>Paul Furman <> wrote:
    >>>I would like to try the 300mm f/2.8 for hand held bee,
    >>>butterfly & dragonfly closeups that fill the
    >>>frame... maybe entirely impractical? They run away from
    >>>200mm & the +2 diopter closeup lens degrades image
    >>>quality.

    >>
    >>I would think a 300mm f/2.8 is going to be far too large
    >>to be supported by a bellows. Maybe an f/4 or an f/5.6
    >>at that focal length would work though.

    >
    >I just played with a D1, PK-13, PB-4, 300/4.5 IF-ED and that seems to work
    >quite well.


    The PB-4 (I have not used a PB-5 or PB-6, but have used
    older Nikon models and many many other brands) is the
    *smoothest* bellows, mechanically, of any by a long
    stretch.

    That does make using it with heavier cameras and lenses
    significantly easier than other bellows units allow.

    I've always assumed the PB-5 and PB-6 would probably be
    equal to the PB-4, but perhaps not. Also there is a Leica
    bellows, I think, that cost something like $1700... and
    one would hope that to be equally smooth.

    Whatever, when talking about hanging heavy lenses off a
    bellows it is probably a good idea to warn folks that it
    may not work as well with some of them as it does with
    others. Lots of bellows, and focusing rails, would
    literally break into pieces with these kinds of loads.

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, May 17, 2007
    #8
  9. Paul Furman

    Toby Guest

    The PB6 uses a staggered double cable release to control auto-aperture
    lenses. First the lens is stopped down manually by cable release #1, then #2
    trips the shutter. No good with G lenses or DXes.

    Toby

    "Paul Furman" <> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:FLP2i.6542$...
    > Matt Clara wrote:
    >>Paul Furman wrote
    >>>Matt Clara wrote:
    >>>>Paul Furman wrote
    >>>>>Who was it who had the page about compatibility of old bellows with
    >>>>>newer cameras? One page I found described the PB-6 as having aperture
    >>>>>coupling so that means it can stop down AI lenses as well as open up G
    >>>>>lenses for focusing? Will I need an extension ring to mount it on a
    >>>>>D200? Is it strong enough to hold a big heavy lens? One review
    >>>>>described this model as notoriously wobbly. Does the PB-6 have swing &
    >>>>>shift?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Here's a page with a decent summary of various bellows:
    >>>>><http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/michaeliu/cameras/shared/ff2macro/ff2bellow.htm>
    >>>>>PB-6 Bellows
    >>>>>A twist of the knob lets you vary the lens extension at will, producing
    >>>>>frame-filling images of the most minute subjects. Provides continuously
    >>>>>variable extension from 48mm to 208mm. For motorized bodies or newer
    >>>>>built in AF cameras, the Bellows Spacer PB-6D enables moving a Nikon
    >>>>>F5, F4E, F4s or F3 with MD-4 on the PB-6 rail without interference. *
    >>>>>Note: An Auto Extension Ring is required when the PB-6 is used with the
    >>>>>F5.
    >>>>
    >>>>That was me, though it doesn't cover the PB-6. No, you won't need an
    >>>>extension ring for the D200 unless you have the battery pack on it
    >>>>(MB-200?), it's strong enough for anything up to a 70-200 f2.8 (though
    >>>>why you'd want to use one of those, I don't know, but I did try mine on
    >>>>a PB-5, and it worked). I believe only the PB-4 has swings and shifts,
    >>>>though I could be wrong. These bellows are great fun. I hope to aquire
    >>>>a PB-4 here, eventually.
    >>>
    >>>Cool... but... where is that page?

    >>
    >> http://www.mattclara.com/misc/nikonbellows/
    >>
    >>>So yes, it'll control aperture on G lenses?

    >>
    >> That I don't know; however, considering the PB-6 is older than G lenses,
    >> I doubt it (I'd certainly check with Nikon before I bet the bank on it).

    >
    > Following the links on your page I found this:
    > <http://support.nikontech.com/cgi-bin/nikonusa.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=900&p_created=1050073583&p_sid=Z6z3HLBi&p_accessibility=0&p_lva=&p_sp=cF9zcmNoPTEmcF9zb3J0X2J5PSZwX2dyaWRzb3J0PSZwX3Jvd19jbnQ9NCZwX3Byb2RzPTAmcF9jYXRzPTAmcF9wdj0mcF9jdj0mcF9zZWFyY2hfdHlwZT1hbnN3ZXJzLnNlYXJjaF9ubCZwX3BhZ2U9MSZwX3NlYXJjaF90ZXh0PXBiLTYgYmVsbG93cw**&p_li=&p_topview=1>
    > "For full exposure control the preferred lens will be a Nikkor lens with
    > an aperture ring. The G-type lens does not provide aperture control for
    > this application."
    >
    > :-(
    >
    > I did also find out about a coupling cable device that allows stopping
    > down:
    > <http://www.nikonians.org/html/resources/nikon_articles/other/close-up_macro/macro_images/F3_PB6_55.jpg>
    > <http://www.nikonians.org/html/resources/nikon_articles/other/close-up_macro/macro_8b.html>
    > "With the plunger-assist automatic aperture control lever activated, the
    > bellows work just like a normal camera body with the little aperture
    > control lever on the lens mount holding the aperture blades wide open.
    > This lever is release only when the shutter is triggered, activating the
    > mechanical plunger on the bellows column to automatically stop-down the
    > aperture blades to the pre-set aperture settings"
    >
    > ... but they end up concluding that the double cable stop-down doo-hicky
    > just introduces camera shake & better to stop down manually...
    >
    > "If only one single cable release is available for the camera body only,
    > the aperture control on the bellow’s column must be disengaged by means of
    > the manual lock provided on it. In such a situation, the aperture should
    > be left wide open (i.e. smallest available f/stop number) during focusing
    > and composition to allow the brightest possible view through the
    > viewfinder. The aperture should then be stopped-down to the desired f/stop
    > number prior the taking the shot."
    >
    >
    >>>I would like to try the 300mm f/2.8 for hand held bee, butterfly &
    >>>dragonfly closeups that fill the frame... maybe entirely impractical?
    >>>They run away from 200mm & the +2 diopter closeup lens degrades image
    >>>quality.

    >>
    >> If you could pull that off, you could be a professional athlete of the
    >> first magnitude! No way you can handhold a bellows setup. I've used
    >> mine with a beanbag, and that came out ok, though you really need two
    >> bean bags, one for the bellows and one for the camera. Annika1980 has
    >> gotten some nice images such as you describe using a 400mm f5.6 on a 20D
    >> with a monopod--manual focus, no less...

    >
    > On a 300mm lens, a 50mm extension is not that extreme (I think) and even
    > less with a 1.4 teleconverter (420mm f/4). It might just get me a little
    > closer to these skittish creatures, I'm hoping. OTOH I did take a peek at
    > John Shaw's Closeups in Nature and he suggests a short extension tube is
    > more appropriate for what I'm talking about.
    >
    > Also, thanks to your page I got some answers about slide duplicating:
    > http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=00H0Hy
    > Which basically says I need an 80mm enlarging lens with a custom
    > adapter... or the special "short-mount" 105 macro, which as best I can
    > tell is what this rig was designed for. My 105 will get close enough to
    > dupe slides, it's just a matter of a copy stand/focusing rail that's
    > lacking.
    >
    > One disparaging review of the PB-6:
    > http://www.imagepower.de/IMAGES/imgEQUIPMENT/PB6.htm
    >
    > More discussion of lens choices & diffraction:
    > http://photo.net/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg?msg_id=000LX3
    > (my 35mm f/2 AI might be useful reversed)
    >
    > Nikon specs:
    > http://www.europe-nikon.com/product/en_GB/products/broad/277/overview.html
    > Suitable lenses: 20mm - 200mm
    > Bellows extension: 48mm - 208mm
    > Support movement: 180mm
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Paul Furman Photography
    > http://www.edgehill.net/1
    > Bay Natives Nursery
    > http://www.baynatives.com
     
    Toby, May 17, 2007
    #9
  10. Paul Furman

    Toby Guest

    I have a 4, 5 and 6. The 5 is the same as the 4 without the moves and
    without a geared rail. Actually I prefer the 6 mechanically, but it is a
    close call.

    Toby

    "Floyd L. Davidson" <> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:...
    > (Philip Homburg) wrote:
    >>Floyd L. Davidson <> wrote:
    >>>Paul Furman <> wrote:
    >>>>I would like to try the 300mm f/2.8 for hand held bee,
    >>>>butterfly & dragonfly closeups that fill the
    >>>>frame... maybe entirely impractical? They run away from
    >>>>200mm & the +2 diopter closeup lens degrades image
    >>>>quality.
    >>>
    >>>I would think a 300mm f/2.8 is going to be far too large
    >>>to be supported by a bellows. Maybe an f/4 or an f/5.6
    >>>at that focal length would work though.

    >>
    >>I just played with a D1, PK-13, PB-4, 300/4.5 IF-ED and that seems to work
    >>quite well.

    >
    > The PB-4 (I have not used a PB-5 or PB-6, but have used
    > older Nikon models and many many other brands) is the
    > *smoothest* bellows, mechanically, of any by a long
    > stretch.
    >
    > That does make using it with heavier cameras and lenses
    > significantly easier than other bellows units allow.
    >
    > I've always assumed the PB-5 and PB-6 would probably be
    > equal to the PB-4, but perhaps not. Also there is a Leica
    > bellows, I think, that cost something like $1700... and
    > one would hope that to be equally smooth.
    >
    > Whatever, when talking about hanging heavy lenses off a
    > bellows it is probably a good idea to warn folks that it
    > may not work as well with some of them as it does with
    > others. Lots of bellows, and focusing rails, would
    > literally break into pieces with these kinds of loads.
    >
    > --
    > Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    > Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Toby, May 17, 2007
    #10
  11. "Toby" <> wrote in message
    news:464c4bea$0$92333$...
    > The PB6 uses a staggered double cable release to control auto-aperture
    > lenses. First the lens is stopped down manually by cable release #1,
    > then #2 trips the shutter. No good with G lenses or DXes.


    Nikon sells an adapter that will do the same thing - sort of a short
    extension tube with a cable socket on it. Also useful for reversed
    lenses. You need the special Nikon cable release.

    --
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio
    Darkroom Automation: F-Stop Timers, Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/index.htm
    n o lindan at ix dot netcom dot com
     
    Nicholas O. Lindan, May 17, 2007
    #11
  12. "Matt Clara" <> wrote in message news:...
    > "Paul Furman" <> wrote in message news:zhL2i.8337$...
    >> Matt Clara wrote:
    >>> "Paul Furman" <> wrote in message news:itK2i.29116$...


    >>>>Here's a page with a decent summary of various bellows:
    >>>><http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/michaeliu/cameras/shared/ff2macro/ff2bellow.htm>
    >>>>PB-6 Bellows
    >>>>A twist of the knob lets you vary the lens extension at will, producing frame-filling images of the most minute subjects.
    >>>>Provides continuously variable extension from 48mm to 208mm. For motorized bodies or newer built in AF cameras, the Bellows
    >>>>Spacer PB-6D enables moving a Nikon F5, F4E, F4s or F3 with MD-4 on the PB-6 rail without interference. * Note: An Auto
    >>>>Extension Ring is required when the PB-6 is used with the F5.


    >>> That was me, though it doesn't cover the PB-6. No, you won't need an extension ring for the D200 unless you have the battery
    >>> pack on it (MB-200?), it's strong enough for anything up to a 70-200 f2.8 (though why you'd want to use one of those, I don't
    >>> know, but I did try mine on a PB-5, and it worked). I believe only the PB-4 has swings and shifts, though I could be wrong.
    >>> These bellows are great fun. I hope to aquire a PB-4 here, eventually.


    >> Cool... but... where is that page?


    > http://www.mattclara.com/misc/nikonbellows/


    >> So yes, it'll control aperture on G lenses?


    > That I don't know; however, considering the PB-6 is older than G lenses, I doubt it (I'd certainly check with Nikon before I bet
    > the bank on it).


    The G lenses can be mounted, but as with Nikon bodies that all permit
    mounting, only ones that are G-compatible will keep the aperture open
    for focus, and permit metering - so the PB-6 will not work for G lenses.
    I would not use a 300mm f2.8 for macro work (too ungainly, and it takes
    LOTS of extension for only somewhat closer focusing ability [and the lens
    may not be sharp with the extension added]). Heavy lenses and bodies
    may also introduce instability between them due to the spring-loaded
    nature of the bayonette mount on the camera (though the D200 should
    be OK). BTW, I have several Nikon extension tubes FS on my web
    page that in various combinations can give a large variety of extensions
    compactly...

    >> I would like to try the 300mm f/2.8 for hand held bee, butterfly & dragonfly closeups that fill the frame... maybe entirely
    >> impractical? They run away from 200mm & the +2 diopter closeup lens degrades image quality.
    >> To be of any use on a tripod, I'll need a much sturdier tripod but the rig I'm looking at has a slide holder which I could use to
    >> hold little flowers & such... and duplicate my old slides. I suspect I'll need a special bellows lens for that configuration
    >> though, my 105 macro lens is awfully long.


    A slide duplicator attachment does make things easier - but near 1:1,
    it is VERY frustrating adjusting magnification, size, and focus...

    > If you could pull that off, you could be a professional athlete of the first magnitude! No way you can handhold a bellows setup.
    > I've used mine with a beanbag, and that came out ok, though you really need two bean bags, one for the bellows and one for the
    > camera. Annika1980 has gotten some nice images such as you describe using a 400mm f5.6 on a 20D with a monopod--manual focus, no
    > less...
    > --
    > www.mattclara.com


    On my web site here ("Bugs") at www.donferrario.com/ruether/phun.html,
    you will find hand-held photos of insects, some up to 3X on film. The
    secret is that I used for most a 200mm f4 (light and small - and sharp)
    with a 2X converter + achromat with a TTL flash mounted at the front
    (ONLY ONE!) pointed at the subject focused point (the relatively large
    flash head acts like a soft box, giving a nice light - and it stops action).
    With patience and many failures on the approaches, the first flash seems
    to "anchor" the insect, giving me opportunity to explore different framings.
    For instance, dragon flies skip away when you are within 6-8 feet, but
    if you slowly and carefully move up on one and get that flash in, you can
    then get very close and shoot what you want (or even move grass out
    of the way from around it...).
    --
    David Ruether

    http://www.donferrario.com/ruether
     
    David Ruether, May 17, 2007
    #12
  13. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Floyd L. Davidson wrote:
    > Paul Furman <> wrote:
    >
    >>I would like to try the 300mm f/2.8 for hand held bee,
    >>butterfly & dragonfly closeups that fill the
    >>frame... maybe entirely impractical? They run away from
    >>200mm & the +2 diopter closeup lens degrades image
    >>quality.

    >
    > I would think a 300mm f/2.8 is going to be far too large
    > to be supported by a bellows. Maybe an f/4 or an f/5.6
    > at that focal length would work though.
    >
    > With the 200mm lense you might try an achromatic
    > diopter, which will probably give better results.
    >
    > The Olympus MCON-35 is a +2.9 diopter that fits a 62mm
    > thread. The Nikon #5T (+1.5 diopter) and #6T (+2.9
    > diopter) also fit 62 mm threads. The Canon 500D +2.0
    > diopters come in 77, 72, and 58mm threads.
    >
    > The Canon 500D diopters are the most expensive, but you
    > can probably find one that does not require a
    > step-up/down adapter to match your lens, and the larger
    > one will certainly avoid any vignetting.


    I have a 500D +2 diopter and it does work fine on the 300/2.8 even
    though it's (only) 77mm on a 112mm lens thread, at closest focus, the
    rest of that glass isn't used. +2 diopter does have a huge impact on the
    focusing distance at 300mm though.

    I was able to test the extension tube concept with a modified lensbaby
    at about 50mm (the PB-6 goes down to 45mm, here's a comparison to the
    closeup lens:
    <http://www.edgehill.net/1/?SC=go.php&DIR=Misc/photography/2007-05-17-macro>
    The lensbaby setup is super wobbly, maybe I'll try it in full sun.

    > I have an MCON-35 +2.9 diopter, but have never tried it
    > on a 200mm lense. It does well in front of a 105mm
    > macro though, and have tried that with a 2x telextender
    > too. I'd expect a similar configuration with your 200mm
    > to be better than hanging a 300mm f/2.8 lense off a
    > bellows.
    >
    >>To be of any use on a tripod, I'll need a much sturdier
    >>tripod but the rig I'm looking at has a slide holder
    >>which I could use to hold little flowers & such... and
    >>duplicate my old slides. I suspect I'll need a special
    >>bellows lens for that configuration though, my 105 macro
    >>lens is awfully long.

    >
    >
    > Enlarging lenses work extremely well at the end of a
    > bellows...


    I guess so... especially if doing tilts on a PB4... that would be more
    fun than the apparently tilt-less PB-6.

    --
    Paul Furman Photography
    http://www.edgehill.net/1
    Bay Natives Nursery
    http://www.baynatives.com
     
    Paul Furman, May 17, 2007
    #13
  14. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    David Ruether wrote:

    > "Matt Clara" <> wrote in message news:...
    >
    >>"Paul Furman" <> wrote in message news:zhL2i.8337$...
    >>
    >>>Matt Clara wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>"Paul Furman" <> wrote in message news:itK2i.29116$...

    >
    >>>>>Here's a page with a decent summary of various bellows:
    >>>>><http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/michaeliu/cameras/shared/ff2macro/ff2bellow.htm>
    >>>>>PB-6 Bellows
    >>>>>A twist of the knob lets you vary the lens extension at will, producing frame-filling images of the most minute subjects.
    >>>>>Provides continuously variable extension from 48mm to 208mm. For motorized bodies or newer built in AF cameras, the Bellows
    >>>>>Spacer PB-6D enables moving a Nikon F5, F4E, F4s or F3 with MD-4 on the PB-6 rail without interference. * Note: An Auto
    >>>>>Extension Ring is required when the PB-6 is used with the F5.

    >
    >>>>That was me, though it doesn't cover the PB-6. No, you won't need an extension ring for the D200 unless you have the battery
    >>>>pack on it (MB-200?), it's strong enough for anything up to a 70-200 f2.8 (though why you'd want to use one of those, I don't
    >>>>know, but I did try mine on a PB-5, and it worked). I believe only the PB-4 has swings and shifts, though I could be wrong.
    >>>>These bellows are great fun. I hope to aquire a PB-4 here, eventually.

    >
    >>>Cool... but... where is that page?

    >
    >>http://www.mattclara.com/misc/nikonbellows/

    >
    >>>So yes, it'll control aperture on G lenses?

    >
    >>That I don't know; however, considering the PB-6 is older than G lenses, I doubt it (I'd certainly check with Nikon before I bet
    >>the bank on it).

    >
    > The G lenses can be mounted, but as with Nikon bodies that all permit
    > mounting, only ones that are G-compatible will keep the aperture open
    > for focus, and permit metering - so the PB-6 will not work for G lenses.


    It does have the option to either have the aperture all the way open
    while composing with AI lenses though... and stop down for the shot so I
    don't see why it wouldn't work with a G lens using the cable connector.
    The D200 would just have to be told the aperture range.

    > I would not use a 300mm f2.8 for macro work (too ungainly, and it takes
    > LOTS of extension for only somewhat closer focusing ability [and the lens
    > may not be sharp with the extension added]).


    Well, I did some testing:
    <http://www.edgehill.net/1/?SC=go.php&DIR=Misc/photography/2007-05-17-macro&PG=2&PIC=8>
    And in the end the 105 f/2.8 VR macro performs useably with stacked
    teleconverters 2x & 1.4x (294mm) in daylight at ISO 800 hand held at a
    good magnification for butterflies to fill the frame. The D200 read f/11
    & 210mm with the 1.4 teleconverter mounted to the body???, who knows
    what the aperture actually works out to be. Curiously, the 300mm f/2.8
    lens with 50mm extension gave me more working distance: about 4 feet
    versus 3 feet. Is that mathematically possible? But the extension tube
    setup was not as sharp.. or maybe just too wobbly to handle. The +2
    diopter closeup lens on the 300 lens made too much magnification for a
    butterfly. I did get one sharp shot at ISO 1600 with the 300 plus 1.4 TC
    plus the closeup lens which comes close to the quality of the 105 micro,
    perhaps because this one was focused at infinity (30 inches away):
    <http://www.edgehill.net/1/?SC=go.php&DIR=Misc/photography/2007-05-17-macro&PG=2&PIC=7>
    Those are all full pixel crops, the dollar bill shots on the previous
    page give an idea of the magnification uncropped.

    > Heavy lenses and bodies
    > may also introduce instability between them due to the spring-loaded
    > nature of the bayonette mount on the camera (though the D200 should
    > be OK). BTW, I have several Nikon extension tubes FS on my web
    > page that in various combinations can give a large variety of extensions
    > compactly...
    >
    >>>I would like to try the 300mm f/2.8 for hand held bee, butterfly & dragonfly closeups that fill the frame... maybe entirely
    >>>impractical? They run away from 200mm & the +2 diopter closeup lens degrades image quality.
    >>>To be of any use on a tripod, I'll need a much sturdier tripod but the rig I'm looking at has a slide holder which I could use to
    >>>hold little flowers & such... and duplicate my old slides. I suspect I'll need a special bellows lens for that configuration
    >>>though, my 105 macro lens is awfully long.

    >
    > A slide duplicator attachment does make things easier - but near 1:1,
    > it is VERY frustrating adjusting magnification, size, and focus...


    Better than *without* a copy stand of some sort though. The PB-6 is the
    way to go for that... I get your point though that's it's still really
    tedious work.... plus I would need another specialized lens for that.

    >>If you could pull that off, you could be a professional athlete of the first magnitude! No way you can handhold a bellows setup.
    >>I've used mine with a beanbag, and that came out ok, though you really need two bean bags, one for the bellows and one for the
    >>camera. Annika1980 has gotten some nice images such as you describe using a 400mm f5.6 on a 20D with a monopod--manual focus, no
    >>less...

    >
    > On my web site here ("Bugs") at www.donferrario.com/ruether/phun.html,
    > you will find hand-held photos of insects, some up to 3X on film. The
    > secret is that I used for most a 200mm f4 (light and small - and sharp)
    > with a 2X converter + achromat with a TTL flash mounted at the front


    Nice "hummingbird-moth":
    http://www.donferrario.com/ruether/web_photos/phun_fotoz/bugs/b62.jpg

    Does a flash even do anything in full daylight? I don't have an
    off-camera flash & don't use my on-camera much. I have thought about
    those mini Nikon flash units that can be mounted on the front of a macro
    lens.. two of them could make real nice 1:1 macros and they can be
    placed off camera without cables in a pinch for general flash work.

    > (ONLY ONE!) pointed at the subject focused point (the relatively large
    > flash head acts like a soft box, giving a nice light - and it stops action).
    > With patience and many failures on the approaches, the first flash seems
    > to "anchor" the insect, giving me opportunity to explore different framings.
    > For instance, dragon flies skip away when you are within 6-8 feet, but
    > if you slowly and carefully move up on one and get that flash in, you can
    > then get very close and shoot what you want (or even move grass out
    > of the way from around it...).


    Deer in the headlights effect... hmmm, clever.

    --
    Paul Furman Photography
    http://www.edgehill.net/1
    Bay Natives Nursery
    http://www.baynatives.com
     
    Paul Furman, May 17, 2007
    #14
  15. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Paul Furman wrote:

    > I was able to test the extension tube concept with a modified lensbaby
    > at about 50mm (the PB-6 goes down to 45mm, here's a comparison to the
    > closeup lens:
    > <http://www.edgehill.net/1/?SC=go.php&DIR=Misc/photography/2007-05-17-macro>
    >
    > The lensbaby setup is super wobbly, maybe I'll try it in full sun.


    btw, I did add some real-world full sun tests to that set. I still
    needed high ISO.
     
    Paul Furman, May 17, 2007
    #15
  16. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Paul Furman wrote:

    > David Ruether wrote:
    >
    >> Matt Clara wrote
    >>
    >>> http://www.mattclara.com/misc/nikonbellows/

    >>
    >>>> So yes, it'll control aperture on G lenses?

    >>
    >>> That I don't know; however, considering the PB-6 is older than G
    >>> lenses, I doubt it (I'd certainly check with Nikon before I bet the
    >>> bank on it).

    >>
    >> The G lenses can be mounted, but as with Nikon bodies that all permit
    >> mounting, only ones that are G-compatible will keep the aperture open
    >> for focus, and permit metering - so the PB-6 will not work for G lenses.

    >
    > It does have the option to either have the aperture all the way open
    > while composing with AI lenses though... and stop down for the shot so I
    > don't see why it wouldn't work with a G lens using the cable connector.
    > The D200 would just have to be told the aperture range.


    You know, I don't think this will work. Looking again at an AI & G lens,
    they both spring to a stopped down position when unmounted but the AI
    lens will only stop down as far as it's ring says & the G lens will stop
    all the way down. The cable connector thing is an AR-10 and it's just a
    mechanical plunger that holds the spring open & when pressed, lets go
    for the aperture to stop down wherever the ring is set. One could put a
    little piece of tape on there to set the aperture on a G lens but it's
    not going to be automatic.

    <http://www.nikonians.org/html/resources/nikon_articles/other/close-up_macro/macro_8b.html>
    "When a lens is normally mounted on to the bellows, aperture control is
    only available through the lens aperture ring. There are no electronic
    contacts on the bellows to facilitate camera body aperture controls.
    During shutter triggering, automatic aperture stop-down will only
    function if the AR-7 (two ISO thread mechanical plungers) or AR-10 (one
    ISO thread mechanical plunger and one 2-pin electronic connector) double
    cable releases are used.

    With either one of the double cable releases, one of the ISO thread
    mechanical plunger must be screwed into the bellow’s front column where
    the lens is mounted and the second cable (mechanical or electronic) will
    be connected to the camera body’s normal cable release port."

    <http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/37071-REG/Nikon_2670_AR_10_Double_Cable_Release.html>
    $ 79.95
    "When used together with the PB-6 Bellows Focusing Attachment, the AR-10
    will stop the lens down to the preselected aperture at the moment of
    exposure. The AR-10 is for the two-pin cameras such as the FM2N, FM3A &
    F3 with motor drives, N70, etc.

    The AR-10 can also be used with the F5, F100, F90, F90x, N90 & N90s
    cameras when accompanied by the MC-25 Adapter Cord."

    Something like this would work only if it also had a built in aperture ring:
    <http://www.nikonians.org/html/resources/nikon_articles/other/close-up_macro/macro_8c.html>
    " When the lens is reverse-mounted, auto stop-down aperture control can
    be achieved with the aid of the BR-6 Auto-Diaphragm Adapter which
    incorporates a plunger-type cable release connector to accept the
    mechanical cable release from either the AR-7 or AR-10 double cable
    release."

    It just doesn't make sense to get a bellows if I can't use my macro G
    lens on it.

    --
    Paul Furman Photography
    http://www.edgehill.net/1
    Bay Natives Nursery
    http://www.baynatives.com
     
    Paul Furman, May 17, 2007
    #16
  17. Paul Furman wrote:

    > You know, I don't think this will work. Looking again at an AI & G
    > lens, they both spring to a stopped down position when unmounted but
    > the AI lens will only stop down as far as it's ring says & the G lens
    > will stop all the way down. The cable connector thing is an AR-10 and
    > it's just a mechanical plunger that holds the spring open & when
    > pressed, lets go for the aperture to stop down wherever the ring is
    > set. One could put a little piece of tape on there to set the
    > aperture on a G lens but it's not going to be automatic.


    Way too much trouble screwing around with bellows, especially if you
    primarily shoot handheld. Just get an old 50/1.4mm AI Nikkor and reverse
    mount it in front of the 105mm VR and you're kicking with some decent
    handheld 3:1 macro.

    <http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2007/small_stuff.htm>







    Rita
     
    Rita Ä Berkowitz, May 17, 2007
    #17
  18. "Rita Ä Berkowitz" <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> wrote in message news:...
    > Paul Furman wrote:


    >> You know, I don't think this will work. Looking again at an AI & G
    >> lens, they both spring to a stopped down position when unmounted but
    >> the AI lens will only stop down as far as it's ring says & the G lens
    >> will stop all the way down. The cable connector thing is an AR-10 and
    >> it's just a mechanical plunger that holds the spring open & when
    >> pressed, lets go for the aperture to stop down wherever the ring is
    >> set. One could put a little piece of tape on there to set the
    >> aperture on a G lens but it's not going to be automatic.


    > Way too much trouble screwing around with bellows, especially if you primarily shoot handheld. Just get an old 50/1.4mm AI Nikkor
    > and reverse mount it in front of the 105mm VR and you're kicking with some decent handheld 3:1 macro.
    > <http://www.geocities.com/ritaberk2007/small_stuff.htm> Rita


    I second this - it is the easiest and cheapest way to get good
    high-magnification images. Use the reverse 50mm f1.4 set wide
    open and the 105 set at what you want (preferably f11 or so
    for best results). Unfortunately, though, the 105 shortens its FL
    during close focus and the 50 shortens it more (why it works),
    and the end result is that there is not much room between the
    lens and subject. You can add a 2X converter, but not with the
    G version...
    --
    David Ruether

    http://www.donferrario.com/ruether
     
    David Ruether, May 18, 2007
    #18
  19. "Paul Furman" <> wrote in message news:7133i.8407$...
    > David Ruether wrote:


    >> The G lenses can be mounted, but as with Nikon bodies that all permit
    >> mounting, only ones that are G-compatible will keep the aperture open
    >> for focus, and permit metering - so the PB-6 will not work for G lenses.


    > It does have the option to either have the aperture all the way open while composing with AI lenses though... and stop down for
    > the shot so I don't see why it wouldn't work with a G lens using the cable connector. The D200 would just have to be told the
    > aperture range.


    As you have since found, that %$#& Nikon move to the "G"
    mount has cabolixed many good old things about Nikon gear,
    including the use of their tubes, bellows, converters, older
    bodies, etc. BAD, Nikon, VERY BAD!!!!

    >> I would not use a 300mm f2.8 for macro work (too ungainly, and it takes
    >> LOTS of extension for only somewhat closer focusing ability [and the lens
    >> may not be sharp with the extension added]).


    > I did get one sharp shot at ISO 1600 with the 300 plus 1.4 TC plus the closeup lens which comes close to the quality of the 105
    > micro, perhaps because this one was focused at infinity (30 inches away):
    > <http://www.edgehill.net/1/?SC=go.php&DIR=Misc/photography/2007-05-17-macro&PG=2&PIC=7>


    >> A slide duplicator attachment does make things easier - but near 1:1,
    >> it is VERY frustrating adjusting magnification, size, and focus...


    > Better than *without* a copy stand of some sort though. The PB-6 is the way to go for that... I get your point though that's it's
    > still really tedious work.... plus I would need another specialized lens for that.


    It's a *pain*!

    >> On my web site here ("Bugs") at www.donferrario.com/ruether/phun.html,
    >> you will find hand-held photos of insects, some up to 3X on film. The
    >> secret is that I used for most a 200mm f4 (light and small - and sharp)
    >> with a 2X converter + achromat with a TTL flash mounted at the front


    > Nice "hummingbird-moth":
    > http://www.donferrario.com/ruether/web_photos/phun_fotoz/bugs/b62.jpg


    This one was shot with a 300mm f4.5 and 2X with flash - it
    is the flash that makes all this possible (and lotsa tries...! ;-).

    > Does a flash even do anything in full daylight? I don't have an off-camera flash & don't use my on-camera much.


    Yes! An SB-24 or similar, using a remote cord and bracket and pointed
    directly at where the subject is focused (use a fixed focus point and move
    the camera/lens), can cover even very small effective stops (like f45)
    if close enough - and easily "swamp" daylight.

    > I have thought about those mini Nikon flash units that can be mounted on the front of a macro lens.. two of them could make real
    > nice 1:1 macros and they can be placed off camera without cables in a pinch for general flash work.


    Do not use two! Too many people do and get either very flat
    lighting and/or double shadows. Yuck!

    >> (ONLY ONE!) pointed at the subject focused point (the relatively large
    >> flash head acts like a soft box, giving a nice light - and it stops action).
    >> With patience and many failures on the approaches, the first flash seems
    >> to "anchor" the insect, giving me opportunity to explore different framings.
    >> For instance, dragon flies skip away when you are within 6-8 feet, but
    >> if you slowly and carefully move up on one and get that flash in, you can
    >> then get very close and shoot what you want (or even move grass out
    >> of the way from around it...).


    > Deer in the headlights effect... hmmm, clever.
    > --
    > Paul Furman Photography


    It was a neat discovery. I could actually touch that large dragonfly
    on my web site and clear the grass around it after the first flash...! ;-)
    And the flash makes the use of optimum stops for lens sharpness
    and DOF (usually hard in macro) easy. With the large flash head
    near the subject, the lighting is soft and surprisingly natural-looking.

    --
    David Ruether

    http://www.donferrario.com/ruether
     
    David Ruether, May 18, 2007
    #19
  20. "David Ruether" <> wrote

    > Do not use two! Too many people do and get either very flat
    > lighting and/or double shadows. Yuck!
    > > > (ONLY ONE!) pointed at the subject focused point (the relatively large
    > > > flash head acts like a soft box, giving a nice light


    I found a good macro flash could be made using a pocket
    light-bouncer gizmo. Aim the flash head forwards/slight angle
    and the bouncer reflects the light down on the subject right in
    front of the lens. Very convenient with TTL metering. A
    variation is to use a potato-masher flash on the side and the
    head swiveled over a bit so the light is up and to the side.
    A few minutes with a mat knife, some velcro and
    white card and a DIY unit is yours for pennies, or:

    http://www.stofen.com/Store/TwoWay.htm

    > > 50/1.4mm AI Nikkor and reverse mount it in front of the 105mm VR

    > Unfortunately, though, the 105 shortens its FL
    > You can add a 2X converter, but not with the
    > G version...


    You can mount the converter on the back of the reversed 50mm,
    but that's getting silly.

    --
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio
    Darkroom Automation: F-Stop Timers, Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/index.htm
    n o lindan at ix dot netcom dot com
    "David Ruether" <> wrote in message news:f2klm0
     
    Nicholas O. Lindan, May 18, 2007
    #20
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