Quesdtion re monitor colour profiling and calibration spiders

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Noons, Mar 5, 2012.

  1. Noons

    Noons Guest

    Hi folks.
    I've seen the previous posts onthis subject but most of them are relatively old
    and may not reflect what is available nowadays.

    What's the general consensus/suggestions on which spider to use - or equivalent
    tool - to perform colour calibration and profiling of a monitor for photography?
    Price is not an issue.

    My monitor is starting to change too much to often and while still satisfactory,
    I find it increasingly needs me to spend half an hour or so calibrating it
    carefully against known images.

    I need a faster mechanism, last thing I want is to gawk weekly at the same image
    for an hour or so!

    Thanks in advance for any feedback.
     
    Noons, Mar 5, 2012
    #1
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  2. Noons

    gordo Guest

    Take a look at these:
    http://spyder.datacolor.com/product-mc-s4elite.php for monitor
    calibration.
    http://spyder.datacolor.com/product-pp-spyderstudio.php the whole package,
    includes printer calibration, et al.

    Gordo


    "Noons" wrote in message news:jj1vrh$7c9$...

    Hi folks.
    I've seen the previous posts onthis subject but most of them are relatively
    old
    and may not reflect what is available nowadays.

    What's the general consensus/suggestions on which spider to use - or
    equivalent
    tool - to perform colour calibration and profiling of a monitor for
    photography?
    Price is not an issue.

    My monitor is starting to change too much to often and while still
    satisfactory,
    I find it increasingly needs me to spend half an hour or so calibrating it
    carefully against known images.

    I need a faster mechanism, last thing I want is to gawk weekly at the same
    image
    for an hour or so!

    Thanks in advance for any feedback.
     
    gordo, Mar 5, 2012
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. In article <jj1vrh$7c9$>, Noons <>
    wrote:

    > What's the general consensus/suggestions on which spider to use - or
    > equivalent
    > tool - to perform colour calibration and profiling of a monitor for
    > photography?
    > Price is not an issue.


    I currently use the second to latest Spyder (3?) and Color Eyes Display
    Pro on a MacBook Pro, which has the non-TN (I can never remember the
    name!) display. The latest Spyder (4?) looks like it is better. It has
    a 7-color sensor which ought to improve on straight RGB. It also will
    be able to do TVs when the software is complete, so I think it will be a
    good way to go. Unfortunately, CEDP doesn't support it yet and the TV
    software isn't available, at least for Macs, so I am waiting.
     
    Robert Peirce, Mar 5, 2012
    #3
  4. Noons

    Savageduck Guest

    On 2012-03-05 01:09:01 -0800, Noons <> said:

    > Hi folks.
    > I've seen the previous posts onthis subject but most of them are
    > relatively old and may not reflect what is available nowadays.
    >
    > What's the general consensus/suggestions on which spider to use - or
    > equivalent tool - to perform colour calibration and profiling of a
    > monitor for photography?
    > Price is not an issue.
    >
    > My monitor is starting to change too much to often and while still
    > satisfactory, I find it increasingly needs me to spend half an hour or
    > so calibrating it carefully against known images.
    >
    > I need a faster mechanism, last thing I want is to gawk weekly at the
    > same image for an hour or so!
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any feedback.


    I use the Pantone huey Pro. It is reasonably priced and does the job
    quickly and simply for me. After initial calibration which is very
    quick, I have it set to recalibrate every 2 weeks.
    Then when the software is in its normal run mode it analyses the
    ambient light falling on the "huey Pro" sensor and the display and the
    software makes appropriate adjustments to the display brightness.
    < http://www.pantone.com/pages/products/product.aspx?pid=562&ca=2 >

    Pantone has some more sophisticated products such as the ColorMunki.
    < http://www.pantone.com/pages/products/product.aspx?pid=1148&ca=2 >

    --
    Regards,

    Savageduck
     
    Savageduck, Mar 5, 2012
    #4
  5. Noons

    Noons Guest

    Noons wrote,on my timestamp of 5/03/2012 8:09 PM:
    >Thanks in advance for any feedback.



    Thanks for all the replies, folks. Much appreciated.
    I'll be reading each and every one carefully and will then decide which way to go.
     
    Noons, Mar 8, 2012
    #5
  6. Noons <> wrote:

    > I've seen the previous posts onthis subject but most of them are relatively old
    > and may not reflect what is available nowadays.


    > What's the general consensus/suggestions on which spider to use - or equivalent
    > tool - to perform colour calibration and profiling of a monitor for photography?
    > Price is not an issue.


    Wide gamut or sRGB?
    Do you also want to calibrate paper (prints) or only a monitor?

    The 'best' solution would be:
    - buy a spectrometer *and* a colorimeter (the DTP94 has low
    DeltaE differences between copies, Spiders tend to have a rather
    high one (and thus can be off quite a bit (8 DeltaE and more,
    IIRC, even fresh out of the factory)), from what I have read,
    but does need a correction for (each) wide gamut monitor)
    - calibrate your colorimeter via the spectrometer (which is
    more accurate out of the box and doesn't need (per screen)
    corrections for wide gamut screens, but is slower and has a
    harder time to read dark colours[1])
    - calibrate your screen using the colorimeter.

    Additionally many spectrometers can read prints, and with an
    xy-table or another automatic device it's quite comfortable.

    Since price is not an issue ... :)

    Of course you need to spend quite some time learning what
    colour management is and how to do it correctly, whatever you do.
    And choose a software that does what you need and gives you enough
    freedom. Personally, I prefer argyllcms, but as powerful as it
    is (and runs on many OSses), it also has a steep learning curve
    (and doesn't handle all hardware)


    > My monitor is starting to change too much to often and while still satisfactory,
    > I find it increasingly needs me to spend half an hour or so calibrating it
    > carefully against known images.


    Your monitor seems to be failing.


    > I need a faster mechanism, last thing I want is to gawk weekly at the same image
    > for an hour or so!


    Well, any way you do it with a colorimeter or spectrometer
    will be faster and more reproducible (and likely more
    accurate, unless you get e.g. a detuned spider).

    A ColorHug (once it becomes available --- and it doesn't do
    CRTs, but they're dying out anyway) should be the fastest
    method (400 samples in 80 seconds), so you should be done in
    a minute or two.


    -Wolfgang

    [1] Though that can be mitigated by a longer integration
    time. However it is rare that drivers actually do that,
    for various reasons. Argyllcms does.
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Mar 14, 2012
    #6
  7. Noons

    gordo Guest

    "Wolfgang Weisselberg" wrote in message
    news:...

    Noons <> wrote:

    > I've seen the previous posts onthis subject but most of them are
    > relatively old
    > and may not reflect what is available nowadays.


    > What's the general consensus/suggestions on which spider to use - or
    > equivalent
    > tool - to perform colour calibration and profiling of a monitor for
    > photography?
    > Price is not an issue.


    Wide gamut or sRGB?
    Do you also want to calibrate paper (prints) or only a monitor?

    The 'best' solution would be:
    - buy a spectrometer *and* a colorimeter (the DTP94 has low
    DeltaE differences between copies, Spiders tend to have a rather
    high one (and thus can be off quite a bit (8 DeltaE and more,
    IIRC, even fresh out of the factory)), from what I have read,
    but does need a correction for (each) wide gamut monitor)
    - calibrate your colorimeter via the spectrometer (which is
    more accurate out of the box and doesn't need (per screen)
    corrections for wide gamut screens, but is slower and has a
    harder time to read dark colours[1])
    - calibrate your screen using the colorimeter.

    Additionally many spectrometers can read prints, and with an
    xy-table or another automatic device it's quite comfortable.

    Since price is not an issue ... :)

    Of course you need to spend quite some time learning what
    colour management is and how to do it correctly, whatever you do.
    And choose a software that does what you need and gives you enough
    freedom. Personally, I prefer argyllcms, but as powerful as it
    is (and runs on many OSses), it also has a steep learning curve
    (and doesn't handle all hardware)


    > My monitor is starting to change too much to often and while still
    > satisfactory,
    > I find it increasingly needs me to spend half an hour or so calibrating it
    > carefully against known images.


    Your monitor seems to be failing.


    > I need a faster mechanism, last thing I want is to gawk weekly at the same
    > image
    > for an hour or so!


    Well, any way you do it with a colorimeter or spectrometer
    will be faster and more reproducible (and likely more
    accurate, unless you get e.g. a detuned spider).

    A ColorHug (once it becomes available --- and it doesn't do
    CRTs, but they're dying out anyway) should be the fastest
    method (400 samples in 80 seconds), so you should be done in
    a minute or two.


    -Wolfgang

    [1] Though that can be mitigated by a longer integration
    time. However it is rare that drivers actually do that,
    for various reasons. Argyllcms does.



    If you want the whole package (monitor and printer calibration) see:

    http://spyder.datacolor.com/product-pp-spyderstudio.php

    Gordo
     
    gordo, Mar 16, 2012
    #7
  8. gordo <> wrote:
    > "Wolfgang Weisselberg" wrote in message
    > Noons <> wrote:


    >> I've seen the previous posts onthis subject but most of them are
    >> relatively old
    >> and may not reflect what is available nowadays.


    >> What's the general consensus/suggestions on which spider to use - or
    >> equivalent
    >> tool - to perform colour calibration and profiling of a monitor for
    >> photography?
    >> Price is not an issue.


    > Wide gamut or sRGB?
    > Do you also want to calibrate paper (prints) or only a monitor?


    [big snip where gordo continues to appropriate my text]

    > If you want the whole package (monitor and printer calibration) see:


    Kindly learn to properly quote and to properly shorten the
    quoted material to the relevant part. Thanks.


    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Mar 18, 2012
    #8
  9. Noons

    Noons Guest

    On Mar 5, 7:09 pm, Noons <> wrote:

    Thanks for the help on this, folks.
    Ended up with a Spyder4Pro, after trying a couple of the other gizmos.
    Works very well, although IMHO the software is a bit quirky when
    dealing with double monitors.
    Very happy with the calibration of my Viewsonic now.
     
    Noons, Apr 9, 2012
    #9
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