stitching together panoramas

Discussion in 'UK Photography' started by Tim W, Aug 22, 2011.

  1. Tim W

    Tim W Guest

    I am not a photographer.

    I have a project on at the moment which requires me to stand on a hilltop
    and photograph the view to the horizon not as a whole panorama but across
    maybe 60 to 90 degrees from left to right. Obviously that will require a
    number of shots and I need a simple program to stitch the shots together to
    make a single long frame. I would be grateful for some recommendations for
    software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
    before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs. I am
    using a Canon A460. I could get hold of am A640 which I _think_ has its own
    internal method for joining frames but I don't really want the delay, I
    doubt the better camera is necessary and I presume the operation would be
    better done on the PC anyway. Am I wrong?

    Once it is done I need to do a little bit of work with compass and maps then
    a vector drawing program to overlay compass bearings, point out some
    features of the landscape and routes between them but I will be fine with
    that part of the work, no probs, same with the general fixing of photos and
    resolutions.

    TIA

    Tim W
     
    Tim W, Aug 22, 2011
    #1
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  2. Tim W

    Geoff Berrow Guest

    On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <>
    wrote:

    >I would be grateful for some recommendations for
    >software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
    >before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.


    Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
    http://hugin.sourceforge.net/

    --
    Geoff Berrow (Put thecat out to email)
    It's only Usenet, no one dies.
    My opinions, not the committee's, mine.
    Simple RFDs www.4theweb.co.uk/rfdmaker
     
    Geoff Berrow, Aug 22, 2011
    #2
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  3. "Geoff Berrow" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
    >>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
    >>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.

    >
    > Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
    > http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
    >

    And remember to get the camera level on a sturdy tripod, (preferably using a
    bubble level for panoramas). and overlap each image by about 25%, this way
    you will help the programme stitch the image together, and get much better
    results.
    --
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    Harry Stottle, Aug 22, 2011
    #3
  4. Tim W

    Tim W Guest

    "Harry Stottle" <> wrote in message
    news:yLs4q.180568$2...
    > "Geoff Berrow" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
    >>>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
    >>>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.

    >>
    >> Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
    >> http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
    >>

    > And remember to get the camera level on a sturdy tripod, (preferably using
    > a bubble level for panoramas). and overlap each image by about 25%, this
    > way you will help the programme stitch the image together, and get much
    > better results.
    > --


    Good thinking! I have a tripod somewhere. I will set it up on the
    triangulation pillar on the hilltop. No bubble but I will get it level
    enough.

    Tim W
     
    Tim W, Aug 22, 2011
    #4
  5. In article <j2tm1n$4r4$>, Tim W <>
    writes
    >
    >"Harry Stottle" <> wrote in message
    >news:yLs4q.180568$2...
    >> "Geoff Berrow" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
    >>>>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
    >>>>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.
    >>>
    >>> Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
    >>> http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
    >>>

    >> And remember to get the camera level on a sturdy tripod, (preferably using
    >> a bubble level for panoramas). and overlap each image by about 25%, this
    >> way you will help the programme stitch the image together, and get much
    >> better results.
    >> --

    >
    >Good thinking! I have a tripod somewhere. I will set it up on the
    >triangulation pillar on the hilltop. No bubble but I will get it level
    >enough.
    >
    >Tim W
    >

    Tim,

    Good advice. Just remember though that it is important to level the
    *tripod* and not just the camera. That is, the axis of rotation of the
    tripod head must be accurately vertical, or the FoV will rise and fall
    as you rotate.

    David
    --
    David Littlewood
     
    David Littlewood, Aug 22, 2011
    #5
  6. Tim W

    cupra Guest

    >"Tim W" wrote in message news:j2tih9$efa$...
    >I am not a photographer.
    >
    >I have a project on at the moment which requires me to stand on a hilltop
    >and photograph the view to the horizon not as a whole panorama but across
    >maybe 60 to 90 degrees from left to right. Obviously that will require a
    >number of shots and I need a simple program to stitch the shots together to
    >make a single long frame. I would be grateful for some recommendations for
    >software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
    >before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs. I am
    >using a Canon A460. I could get hold of am A640 which I _think_ has its
    >own internal method for joining frames but I don't really want the delay, I
    >doubt the better camera is necessary and I presume the operation would be
    >better done on the PC anyway. Am I wrong?
    >

    <snip>

    If you want 'no-fuss' try:

    http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/redmond/groups/ivm/ICE/

    Only heard about this a couple of weeks ago and it's performed flawlessly so
    far!

    Make sure you overlap at least a third of each frame, shoot in portrait and
    leave some 'space' at top and bottom of each frame as the software will
    'warp' the image and you can end up losing top/bottom detail.
     
    cupra, Aug 22, 2011
    #6
  7. Tim W

    Bruce Guest

    David Littlewood <> wrote:
    >In article <j2tm1n$4r4$>, Tim W <>
    >writes
    >>"Harry Stottle" <> wrote in message
    >>news:yLs4q.180568$2...
    >>> "Geoff Berrow" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
    >>>>>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
    >>>>>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.
    >>>>
    >>>> Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
    >>>> http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
    >>>>
    >>> And remember to get the camera level on a sturdy tripod, (preferably using
    >>> a bubble level for panoramas). and overlap each image by about 25%, this
    >>> way you will help the programme stitch the image together, and get much
    >>> better results.
    >>> --

    >>
    >>Good thinking! I have a tripod somewhere. I will set it up on the
    >>triangulation pillar on the hilltop. No bubble but I will get it level
    >>enough.
    >>
    >>Tim W
    >>

    >Tim,
    >
    >Good advice. Just remember though that it is important to level the
    >*tripod* and not just the camera. That is, the axis of rotation of the
    >tripod head must be accurately vertical, or the FoV will rise and fall
    >as you rotate.



    That's good advice.

    Personally, I would be tempted to borrow one of the latest Sony
    digicams that offer the "sweep panorama" feature. Like all the very
    best ideas, it is brilliantly simple. The results are of excellent
    quality. No tripod needed!
     
    Bruce, Aug 22, 2011
    #7
  8. Tim W

    Tim W Guest

    "Bruce" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > David Littlewood <> wrote:
    >>In article <j2tm1n$4r4$>, Tim W <>
    >>writes
    >>>"Harry Stottle" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:yLs4q.180568$2...
    >>>> "Geoff Berrow" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <>
    >>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
    >>>>>>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and
    >>>>>>easily
    >>>>>>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
    >>>>> http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
    >>>>>
    >>>> And remember to get the camera level on a sturdy tripod, (preferably
    >>>> using
    >>>> a bubble level for panoramas). and overlap each image by about 25%,
    >>>> this
    >>>> way you will help the programme stitch the image together, and get much
    >>>> better results.
    >>>> --
    >>>
    >>>Good thinking! I have a tripod somewhere. I will set it up on the
    >>>triangulation pillar on the hilltop. No bubble but I will get it level
    >>>enough.
    >>>
    >>>Tim W
    >>>

    >>Tim,
    >>
    >>Good advice. Just remember though that it is important to level the
    >>*tripod* and not just the camera. That is, the axis of rotation of the
    >>tripod head must be accurately vertical, or the FoV will rise and fall
    >>as you rotate.

    >
    >
    > That's good advice.
    >
    > Personally, I would be tempted to borrow one of the latest Sony
    > digicams that offer the "sweep panorama" feature. Like all the very
    > best ideas, it is brilliantly simple. The results are of excellent
    > quality. No tripod needed!
    >


    I am sure that is a good bit of kit.

    I went up and did a trial run thisafternoon and there is one factor which I
    think will be more important than any other. That is if I can get to the
    site in the sunshine, in the early morning, before it is too high, while it
    is still behind me, maybe after rain but certainly before any haze or mist
    develops - then I will get the best colours, the best clarity, the best
    definition of contours and depth of perspective and I will have a good
    image. No amount of money spent in Jessops or time at the pc will buy me
    that.

    6.30am tomorrow then.

    Tim W
     
    Tim W, Aug 22, 2011
    #8
  9. Tim W

    Bruce Guest

    "Tim W" <> wrote:
    >"Bruce" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> David Littlewood <> wrote:
    >>>In article <j2tm1n$4r4$>, Tim W <>
    >>>writes
    >>>>"Harry Stottle" <> wrote in message
    >>>>news:yLs4q.180568$2...
    >>>>> "Geoff Berrow" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:...
    >>>>>> On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 13:36:36 +0100, "Tim W" <>
    >>>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>I would be grateful for some recommendations for
    >>>>>>>software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and
    >>>>>>>easily
    >>>>>>>before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Well I've only used one but it seems good. Hugin
    >>>>>> http://hugin.sourceforge.net/
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> And remember to get the camera level on a sturdy tripod, (preferably
    >>>>> using
    >>>>> a bubble level for panoramas). and overlap each image by about 25%,
    >>>>> this
    >>>>> way you will help the programme stitch the image together, and get much
    >>>>> better results.
    >>>>> --
    >>>>
    >>>>Good thinking! I have a tripod somewhere. I will set it up on the
    >>>>triangulation pillar on the hilltop. No bubble but I will get it level
    >>>>enough.
    >>>>
    >>>>Tim W
    >>>>
    >>>Tim,
    >>>
    >>>Good advice. Just remember though that it is important to level the
    >>>*tripod* and not just the camera. That is, the axis of rotation of the
    >>>tripod head must be accurately vertical, or the FoV will rise and fall
    >>>as you rotate.

    >>
    >>
    >> That's good advice.
    >>
    >> Personally, I would be tempted to borrow one of the latest Sony
    >> digicams that offer the "sweep panorama" feature. Like all the very
    >> best ideas, it is brilliantly simple. The results are of excellent
    >> quality. No tripod needed!
    >>

    >
    >I am sure that is a good bit of kit.
    >
    >I went up and did a trial run thisafternoon and there is one factor which I
    >think will be more important than any other. That is if I can get to the
    >site in the sunshine, in the early morning, before it is too high, while it
    >is still behind me, maybe after rain but certainly before any haze or mist
    >develops - then I will get the best colours, the best clarity, the best
    >definition of contours and depth of perspective and I will have a good
    >image. No amount of money spent in Jessops or time at the pc will buy me
    >that.
    >
    >6.30am tomorrow then.



    Good luck! It is really heartening to hear from someone who
    understands about light. It is the single most important aspect of
    photography, yet so very few "photographers" bother to pay it any
    attention, except when deciding whether or not to use flash.
     
    Bruce, Aug 22, 2011
    #9
  10. Tim W

    Tim W Guest

    "Bruce" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Tim W" <> wrote:
    >>


    >>I went up and did a trial run thisafternoon and there is one factor which
    >>I
    >>think will be more important than any other. That is if I can get to the
    >>site in the sunshine, in the early morning, before it is too high, while
    >>it
    >>is still behind me, maybe after rain but certainly before any haze or mist
    >>develops - then I will get the best colours, the best clarity, the best
    >>definition of contours and depth of perspective and I will have a good
    >>image. No amount of money spent in Jessops or time at the pc will buy me
    >>that.
    >>
    >>6.30am tomorrow then.

    >
    >
    > Good luck! It is really heartening to hear from someone who
    > understands about light. It is the single most important aspect of
    > photography, yet so very few "photographers" bother to pay it any
    > attention, except when deciding whether or not to use flash.
    >


    Thanks. I have very little understanding but it was obvious when I got up
    there. I really appreciate the help from people here. I will show you the
    results

    Tim W
     
    Tim W, Aug 22, 2011
    #10
  11. cupra <> was inspired to say
    >>"Tim W" wrote in message news:j2tih9$efa$...
    >>I am not a photographer.
    >>
    >>I have a project on at the moment which requires me to stand on a
    >>hilltop and photograph the view to the horizon not as a whole panorama
    >>but across maybe 60 to 90 degrees from left to right. Obviously that
    >>will require a number of shots and I need a simple program to stitch
    >>the shots together to make a single long frame. I would be grateful
    >>for some recommendations for software which will do that (and maybe
    >>only that) efficiently and easily before I start downloading and
    >>testing too many unsuitable programs. I am using a Canon A460. I could
    >>get hold of am A640 which I _think_ has its own internal method for
    >>joining frames but I don't really want the delay, I doubt the better
    >>camera is necessary and I presume the operation would be better done
    >>on the PC anyway. Am I wrong?
    >>

    ><snip>
    >
    >If you want 'no-fuss' try:
    >
    >http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/redmond/groups/ivm/ICE/
    >
    >Only heard about this a couple of weeks ago and it's performed
    >flawlessly so far!
    >
    >Make sure you overlap at least a third of each frame, shoot in portrait
    >and leave some 'space' at top and bottom of each frame as the software
    >will 'warp' the image and you can end up losing top/bottom detail.


    I only discovered this a couple of months ago, and tried it out for our
    club. Not perfect, but Recommended - especially at this price (free!).

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/watchman/5907840247/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/watchman/5908398948/

    Mike
    --
    Michael J Davis

    http://www.fluidr.com/photos/watchman/

    <><
    "I never have taken a picture I've intended.
    They're always better or worse."
    Diane Arbus
    <><
     
    Michael J Davis, Aug 22, 2011
    #11
  12. "Tim W" <> wrote:
    > I have a project on at the moment which requires me to stand on a hilltop
    > and photograph the view to the horizon not as a whole panorama but across
    > maybe 60 to 90 degrees from left to right.


    If you mean 90 degrees total view then you could simply get a camera with
    an ultra-wide lens, there are some compacts with such lenses or attachments
    available to produce such a view, my Ricoh GX100 produces very good shots
    about 90 degrees wide with its 19mm adaptor or 75 degrees wide without.
    There are also some attachment lenses around which give much wider results
    at a good quality, equivalent of a 17mm lens on a 35mm camera though I
    forget who makes them. Of course most SLR systems also offer ultrawides but
    that would be more expensive.

    In film camera days there was an amazing camera called the Horizont (made
    by Russian manufacturer Zenith I think) that had a lens which panned during
    exposure onto a wide piece of film using a slit shutter, I think it did a
    full 180 degrees, I expect it must still be find these beasts somewhere.
     
    Gordon Freeman, Aug 22, 2011
    #12
  13. Tim W

    Tim W Guest

    "Gordon Freeman" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9F49E316685BAC9A7@127.0.0.1...
    > "Tim W" <> wrote:
    >> I have a project on at the moment which requires me to stand on a hilltop
    >> and photograph the view to the horizon not as a whole panorama but across
    >> maybe 60 to 90 degrees from left to right.

    >
    > If you mean 90 degrees total view then you could simply get a camera with
    > an ultra-wide lens, there are some compacts with such lenses or
    > attachments
    > available to produce such a view, my Ricoh GX100 produces very good shots
    > about 90 degrees wide with its 19mm adaptor or 75 degrees wide without.
    > There are also some attachment lenses around which give much wider results
    > at a good quality, equivalent of a 17mm lens on a 35mm camera though I
    > forget who makes them. Of course most SLR systems also offer ultrawides
    > but
    > that would be more expensive.
    >
    > In film camera days there was an amazing camera called the Horizont (made
    > by Russian manufacturer Zenith I think) that had a lens which panned
    > during
    > exposure onto a wide piece of film using a slit shutter, I think it did a
    > full 180 degrees, I expect it must still be find these beasts somewhere.


    Is that what they used for those very wide school photos? It was said you
    could appear in the far left of the school photo and then if you ran round
    the back fast enough you could appear again at the far right.

    Tim w
     
    Tim W, Aug 22, 2011
    #13
  14. Tim W

    Tim W Guest

    " cupra" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >"Tim W" wrote in message news:j2tih9$efa$...
    >I am not a photographer.
    >
    >I have a project on at the moment which requires me to stand on a hilltop
    >and photograph the view to the horizon not as a whole panorama but across
    >maybe 60 to 90 degrees from left to right. Obviously that will require a
    >number of shots and I need a simple program to stitch the shots together to
    >make a single long frame. I would be grateful for some recommendations for
    >software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
    >before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.

    <snip>

    If you want 'no-fuss' try:

    http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/redmond/groups/ivm/ICE/

    Only heard about this a couple of weeks ago and it's performed flawlessly so
    far!

    Make sure you overlap at least a third of each frame, shoot in portrait and
    leave some 'space' at top and bottom of each frame as the software will
    'warp' the image and you can end up losing top/bottom detail.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    I couldn't get Hugin to work. Don't know why but it sent the CPU usage up to
    100% and after five mins I had to terminate it. Canon Photostitch working
    but not particularly well. The microsoft version might be it, so thanks.

    Tim w
     
    Tim W, Aug 22, 2011
    #14
  15. Tim W

    Tim W Guest

    "Tim W" <> wrote in message
    news:j2ud64$6qa$...
    >
    >
    > > ..... I really appreciate the help from people here. I will show you the

    > results
    >

    This is some of this afternoon's efforts:
    http://s995.photobucket.com/albums/af79/Timbowps/Landscape Panoramas/

    Not good enough, the light is all wrong, it's too hazy, the stitch program
    is making the skyline stepped. I need to get a lot more visible detail. Back
    tomorrow.

    Tim W
     
    Tim W, Aug 22, 2011
    #15
  16. Tim W

    Tim W Guest

    "Tim W" <> wrote in message
    news:j2ud64$6qa$...
    >
    >
    > > ..... I really appreciate the help from people here. I will show you the

    > results
    >

    This is some of this afternoon's efforts:
    http://s995.photobucket.com/albums/af79/Timbowps/Landscape Panoramas/

    Not good enough, the light is all wrong, it's too hazy, the stitch program
    is making the skyline stepped. I need to get a lot more visible detail. Back
    tomorrow.

    Tim W
     
    Tim W, Aug 22, 2011
    #16
  17. Tim W

    Savageduck Guest

    On 2011-08-22 15:14:57 -0700, "Tim W" <> said:

    >
    > " cupra" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> "Tim W" wrote in message news:j2tih9$efa$...
    >> I am not a photographer.
    >>
    >> I have a project on at the moment which requires me to stand on a hilltop
    >> and photograph the view to the horizon not as a whole panorama but across
    >> maybe 60 to 90 degrees from left to right. Obviously that will require a
    >> number of shots and I need a simple program to stitch the shots together to
    >> make a single long frame. I would be grateful for some recommendations for
    >> software which will do that (and maybe only that) efficiently and easily
    >> before I start downloading and testing too many unsuitable programs.

    > <snip>
    >
    > If you want 'no-fuss' try:
    >
    > http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/redmond/groups/ivm/ICE/
    >
    > Only heard about this a couple of weeks ago and it's performed flawlessly so
    > far!
    >
    > Make sure you overlap at least a third of each frame, shoot in portrait and
    > leave some 'space' at top and bottom of each frame as the software will
    > 'warp' the image and you can end up losing top/bottom detail.
    > -------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > I couldn't get Hugin to work. Don't know why but it sent the CPU usage up to
    > 100% and after five mins I had to terminate it. Canon Photostitch working
    > but not particularly well. The microsoft version might be it, so thanks.
    >
    > Tim w


    I use CS5 for panoramas, it give you a fair number of different
    distortion corrections when merging. I find that if I am diligent with
    my prep regarding exposure and appropriate selection of portrait or
    landscape orientation for shooting the scene, I can get a fairly decent
    result.
    When stitching more than 3 shots you will always be better off shooting
    in portrait orientation so that you can get a better balanced, less
    "letter box" type panorama.

    Here are a couple I have put together, and you will see the "letter
    box" effect in the first.
    < http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/Avila-Pano-w.jpg >
    < http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/KCSNP-Pano-3w.jpg >
    < http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/HR-PanoAdcw2.jpg >

    --
    Regards,

    Savageduck
     
    Savageduck, Aug 22, 2011
    #17
  18. Tim W

    Rob Morley Guest

    On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 22:43:42 +0100
    "Tim W" <> wrote:
    >
    > "Gordon Freeman" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns9F49E316685BAC9A7@127.0.0.1...


    > > In film camera days there was an amazing camera called the Horizont
    > > (made by Russian manufacturer Zenith I think) that had a lens which
    > > panned during
    > > exposure onto a wide piece of film using a slit shutter, I think it
    > > did a full 180 degrees, I expect it must still be find these beasts
    > > somewhere.

    >
    > Is that what they used for those very wide school photos? It was said
    > you could appear in the far left of the school photo and then if you
    > ran round the back fast enough you could appear again at the far
    > right.
    >

    Same principle, but with rather less than 180 degree field of view.
    Also similar to the strip film camera used for photo finishes at
    racetracks, although in that case the subject moves across the field of
    view rather than the camera panning.
     
    Rob Morley, Aug 23, 2011
    #18
  19. Tim W

    Bruce Guest

    Gordon Freeman <> wrote:
    >In film camera days there was an amazing camera called the Horizont (made
    >by Russian manufacturer Zenith I think) that had a lens which panned during
    >exposure onto a wide piece of film using a slit shutter, I think it did a
    >full 180 degrees, I expect it must still be find these beasts somewhere.



    Brand new Horizon(t) cameras can still be found on eBay. I don't know
    whether they are still manufactured, or if the cameras offered are
    new, but old stock. The later Horizon models look a little sleeker
    than the early Horizont but I suspect the innards are much the same.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horizon_(camera)

    (you may need to copy and paste the above URL into your browser's
    address window)
     
    Bruce, Aug 23, 2011
    #19
  20. "Tim W" <> wrote in message
    news:j2ul1p$r7d$...
    >
    > "Tim W" <> wrote in message
    > news:j2ud64$6qa$...
    >>
    >>
    >> > ..... I really appreciate the help from people here. I will show you
    >> > the

    >> results
    >>

    > This is some of this afternoon's efforts:
    > http://s995.photobucket.com/albums/af79/Timbowps/Landscape Panoramas/
    >
    > Not good enough, the light is all wrong, it's too hazy, the stitch program
    > is making the skyline stepped. I need to get a lot more visible detail.
    > Back tomorrow.
    >

    Are you fixing the aperture, speed, and focus?
    Rule number 1) Panoramas are best done in manual mode if possible, so all
    the settings remain the same for each picture..
    I once took a panorama of a long bridge, behind a field of cows, and
    couldn't understand why the images wouldn't line up properly, (this was
    before automatic stitching programmes), the cows were out of line with every
    join, it took me about half an hour to realise that the reason the cows
    would not line up was because they had moved between shots.
    Rule number 2) avoid moving objects in panoramas :)
    --
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    Harry Stottle, Aug 23, 2011
    #20
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