35mm film photography comeback?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Cursitor Doom, Apr 5, 2014.

  1. I see a lot of 35mm film cameras are still selling well on Ebay. The
    quality marques, anyway. Is there a resurgence of interest in film
    photography in general or is there simply a rump of vintage
    photography hobbyists and collectors who simply refuse to switch to
    digital?
     
    Cursitor Doom, Apr 5, 2014
    #1
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  2. Cursitor Doom

    nospam Guest

    there is no resurgence. film is dead. if you looked at the prices
    people are getting for those cameras you'd realize just how dead it
    really is.

    some people like to collect old cameras and there are still some idiots
    who think it's better than digital, but that's about it.
     
    nospam, Apr 5, 2014
    #2
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  3. Cursitor Doom

    philo  Guest


    I have a friend who rents an antique booth and I really laughed at him
    when he bought up all the old film cameras he could find at rummage
    sales and EBay.

    The joke was on me because there are tons of collectors out there who
    will pay enough to make his business profitable. If he is asking $25 for
    a camera he paid $5 it may seem like a good deal to the many Chicago
    people who come up here looking for "small town" bargains.
    He also told me a lot of the purchases are to people from Europe and Asia.

    Also: Students often purchase 35mm cameras. There are a number of
    art-based colleges in town here that like to let the students get a feel
    for the older technology.


    Finally, there is a big "hipster"movement comprised of folks less than
    half my age who wear "retro" clothing and often have a 35 mm camera
    around their neck...which may be nothing more than a prop...but who
    knows maybe some of them really use the cameras.
     
    philo , Apr 5, 2014
    #3
  4. I personally prefer film photography by a wide margin, but I'm afraid
    the pricing for older cameras - high or low - doesn't signal a
    resurgence. Collectors, nostalgia freaks, or fools. It's literally
    become too difficult for anyone but the most maniacal hobbyist to get
    supplies and equipment. I sold my last film camera when the last
    Kodachrome processing plant closed.

    Fun thing is, I go to flea markets every weekend. An amazing number of
    people are pricing old Canon AE-1s and such as though it was still the
    90's.
     
    Scott Schuckert, Apr 5, 2014
    #4
  5. Cursitor Doom

    nospam Guest

    I have a friend who rents an antique booth and I really laughed at him
    when he bought up all the old film cameras he could find at rummage
    sales and EBay.

    The joke was on me because there are tons of collectors out there who
    will pay enough to make his business profitable. If he is asking $25 for
    a camera he paid $5 it may seem like a good deal to the many Chicago
    people who come up here looking for "small town" bargains.
    He also told me a lot of the purchases are to people from Europe and Asia.[/QUOTE]

    collectors collect. they don't actually use the cameras to take photos.
    that is a really stupid idea. it exists mainly because a bunch of film
    luddites won't accept that film is dead, so they think they have to
    teach the same things they learned when they were a student. what's the
    point in teaching obsolete skills to art students who will not only
    never used anything they learn but totally waste their time in the
    process? anyone teaching film photography these days should be fired on
    the spot.
    doubt it, and it's extremely rare to see a film camera anyway. they're
    all on instagram, facebook, snapchat and whatever other social media
    platform is in fashion this month, using their smartphone for a camera.
     
    nospam, Apr 6, 2014
    #5
  6. Cursitor Doom

    nospam Guest

    what for? digital blows film away in both quality and convenience.
    better late than never.
    it's not just cameras. i see all sorts of stuff at flea markets and
    swap meets that are ridiculously overpriced.

    on the other hand, there are also some very good deals to be had too.
    the fun part is you never know what you might find.
     
    nospam, Apr 6, 2014
    #6
  7. Cursitor Doom

    philo  Guest



    There is an artist/photographer here in town who fits into sort of a
    niche market. He prints his 35mm B&W photos then hand paints them.

    He's been doing this since the days before digital photography and never
    changed his methods. The images are nothing at all like Photoshop. The
    paper used for digital printing would not lend itself to paint.

    I know he's not the only person in the world who does this, but people
    like his unique approach and he earns his living by doing that.
     
    philo , Apr 6, 2014
    #7
  8. Cursitor Doom

    Noons Guest

    The day morons like you stop calling film users "stupid" and "luddites"
    is the day digital will gain ANY credibility with film users. Until
    then, it's just noise from unidentified scammers like you pushing your
    digital wares under "kewl" handles in the "online market".
     
    Noons, Apr 6, 2014
    #8
  9. Cursitor Doom

    nospam Guest

    The day morons like you stop calling film users "stupid" and "luddites"
    is the day digital will gain ANY credibility with film users. Until
    then, it's just noise from unidentified scammers like you pushing your
    digital wares under "kewl" handles in the "online market".[/QUOTE]

    i'm not pushing anything. digital surpassed film long ago and anyone
    still using film certainly isn't doing it for quality purposes. they're
    living in the past.
     
    nospam, Apr 6, 2014
    #9
  10. Every future design engineer who will work in the
    automotive industry, and for that matter every Saturday
    mechanic too, necessarily has to work for at least 6
    weeks in a horse stable shoveling horseshit. It helps
    later to understand marketing bullshit.

    Same basic principal as teaching film to teenagers who
    could otherwise never become real photographers, who
    smell like stop bath.
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Apr 6, 2014
    #10
  11. Cursitor Doom

    Noons Guest

    Yes, you most definitely are.
    Yes, and?
    and did anyone mention quality, imbecile?
    the only one still living in the past of film vs digital is YOU!
     
    Noons, Apr 6, 2014
    #11
  12. Cursitor Doom

    Noons Guest

    Exactly. And that is what is missing from you.
    As opposed to reeking of would-be-photographer pretentious "knowledge"
    like you do?
     
    Noons, Apr 6, 2014
    #12
  13. Cursitor Doom

    philo  Guest



    Yep, to really learn something you need to go back to the roots.
     
    philo , Apr 6, 2014
    #13
  14.  
    Floyd L. Davidson, Apr 6, 2014
    #14
  15. Cursitor Doom

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On 04/05/2014 05:45 PM, Scott Schuckert wrote:
    : >
    : > I personally prefer film photography by a wide margin, but I'm afraid
    : > the pricing for older cameras - high or low - doesn't signal a
    : > resurgence. Collectors, nostalgia freaks, or fools. It's literally
    : > become too difficult for anyone but the most maniacal hobbyist to get
    : > supplies and equipment. I sold my last film camera when the last
    : > Kodachrome processing plant closed.
    : >
    : > Fun thing is, I go to flea markets every weekend. An amazing number of
    : > people are pricing old Canon AE-1s and such as though it was still the
    : > 90's.
    :
    :
    :
    : There is an artist/photographer here in town who fits into sort of a
    : niche market. He prints his 35mm B&W photos then hand paints them.
    :
    : He's been doing this since the days before digital photography and never
    : changed his methods. The images are nothing at all like Photoshop. The
    : paper used for digital printing would not lend itself to paint.

    I get everything you say except that last statement. With the enormous variety
    of papers available for digital printing, it's hard to see none of them being
    adaptable to painting. I've had a couple of prints done on watercolor paper,
    for example.

    : I know he's not the only person in the world who does this, but people
    : like his unique approach and he earns his living by doing that.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Apr 6, 2014
    #15
  16. Cursitor Doom

    nospam Guest

    Yep, to really learn something you need to go back to the roots.[/QUOTE]

    nonsense.

    it's much easier to learn photography with digital than it ever was
    with film.

    the only people pushing learning photography by studying film are those
    who don't know much about digital.
     
    nospam, Apr 6, 2014
    #16
  17. Convenience, I'll give you. Quality is debatable. Maybe I'm using the
    wrong equipment (midrange Nikon body with mostly high-end legacy
    Nikkors) and don't get either the dynamic range or resolution I'm used
    to from 35mm film, let alone the medium or large format stuff I used to
    use.

    Then again, I used to have a fairly extensive darkroom, equipped for
    B&W and color, where I spent most of my time. It was a craft, not
    little bits of computer code. All I know is that I took far better
    pictures on film, every week, than I EVER have on digital.

    That's why I prefer it.
     
    Scott Schuckert, Apr 6, 2014
    #17
  18. Cursitor Doom

    philo  Guest

    Yes. I forgot what a huge variety of papers is now available...anyway
    the person I know is not going to change anything with his processing.
     
    philo , Apr 6, 2014
    #18
  19. Cursitor Doom

    philo  Guest



    I got my first digital camera about 14 years ago. It's a 1Mp and I still
    have it but of course don't use it anymore. I used my 35mm and medium
    format camera for many more years and as I got better digital cameras
    used my film cameras less and less.

    By the time I got my 50D my film cameras were in disuse.


    One day I wanted to settle the matter once and for all...and waited for
    the day of perfect sun...then compared my medium format to the Canon.

    The digital camera was better so I am now a firm believer in the new
    technology. However I never did completely dismantle my darkroom.

    Years ago I built my own large format camera (using parts from an old
    enlarger) and produced a number of Calotypes. I just don't think I could
    ever quite get that effect digitally.
     
    philo , Apr 6, 2014
    #19
  20. Cursitor Doom

    Mike Trainor Guest

    Specially the ones who care about dynamic range.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_versus_film_photography#Dynamic_range

    is one place where this problem is addressed. I do not think
    that the Nikon D300 is close to good film .... but I can live
    with it for most of the time.

    And, I think in time the problem will be solved ... or become
    moot. Consider that hardly anyone know what good stereo
    sound is anymore. But the little ear things have won the game.

    mt
     
    Mike Trainor, Apr 6, 2014
    #20
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