800 ISO 35mm

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Mike James, Aug 22, 2003.

  1. Mike James

    Mike James Guest

    I know some people are going to consider me a dinosaur, but are the film
    manufacturers serious here. 800 ISO 35mm for portraiture?

    I trained back in the 60s and worked seriously as a photographer until the
    mid 70s when I just gave it all away. Having recently returned to the fold,
    (I don't think anyone can seriously give it away once bitten by the bug -
    but I digress) I find, to my absolute amazement, that photographers are
    seriously considering using 800 ISO 35mm for portraits. It has taken me a
    while to get my old head around using 35mm for portraits let alone a film of
    this speed.

    Just how good are these films, in particular Fujicolor and Kodacolor?

    Are there any photographers out there who can give me an honest appraisal
    without the marketing hype. I have a sudden rush job to do taking some press
    photos and I don't have time to test. I would normally use a slower film say
    160 ISO but am tempted by the extra speed. Can I get acceptable 10 x 8s from
    this film? Rest assured the lens is capable and the technique is still
    there,I hope, so it's really up to the film.

    kind regards

    Mike James
     
    Mike James, Aug 22, 2003
    #1
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  2. Mike James

    Üter Guest

    Just how good are these films, in particular Fujicolor and Kodacolor?

    Better than they were in the 60's. :)
     
    Üter, Aug 22, 2003
    #2
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  3. I wouldn't consider 35mm *OR* ASA 800 for serious portraiture.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 22, 2003
    #3
  4. Mike James

    Just Me Guest

    You would be surprised at how much poor quality is accepted now days in
    everything let alone photography. But I agree with you 100%.
     
    Just Me, Aug 22, 2003
    #4
  5. Mike James

    Dan Uneken Guest

    People have been know to use PAINT to make portraits!
    Imagine! !
    Choosing a medium is the ultimate responsibility of the photographer
    and is a function of what the portrait is for and how he/she wants the
    image to look like.
    Think of Anton Corbijn, for instance. Different game, different rules.
     
    Dan Uneken, Aug 22, 2003
    #5
  6. Think of Anton Corbijn, for instance. Different game, different rules.

    Never heard of 'em.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 22, 2003
    #6
  7. You would be surprised at how much poor quality is accepted now days in
    Oh, I know. We only have one studio here in town and their work is
    crap. I've thought of going back into it but the guy has his own mini
    lab. No way I'm going to try and compete with that.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 22, 2003
    #7
  8. Think of Anton Corbijn, for instance. Different game, different rules.
    That would be why...
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 22, 2003
    #8
  9. Mike James

    Mike James Guest

    To all those who read the whole of my post and actually understood what I
    was asking, thank you for answering promptly with your helpful information.
    It helped me make an important decision about a rush job (the time to test
    800 ISO film is not on a job).

    To Üter - I will be the first to admit that I had to Google Anton Corbijn
    but that was not what my post was about. Yes, we all know that some people
    use paint to make a portrait but try giving a grainy 10 x 8 to the average
    newspaper editor and you're not going to be taking pictures for a living for
    very long.
    regards
    Mike
     
    Mike James, Aug 23, 2003
    #9
  10. Mike James

    LyghtBynder Guest

    Properly exposed, processed and printed 800 speed Fuji will go 11x14
    with no discernable grain at viewing distances. When you (and I) were
    in the business in the 60's, the only films worth a **** was
    e-6/cibachrome. There have been *MAJOR* inroads made in film
    technology since then, try it!!!

    To save yourself a lot of time and expense, buy a good digital camera
    and learn to use it (with something like the Nikon D-1, you won't have
    to learn much with your history, you'll love the freedom from the
    smell of stop and fix and the ability to 'correct' images that would
    have been useless shot with a film camera. :)
     
    LyghtBynder, Aug 25, 2003
    #10
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