A few little ditties...Pyro Staining and how the hell did I develop a roll of film in dim light with

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Some Dude, Nov 13, 2004.

  1. Some Dude

    Some Dude Guest

    Greetings. Long time.

    I've been pretty giddy about Pyro PMK lately and i'm looking at old
    negatives and thinking I'd like to stain them like you'd post-stain in
    regular development. Seems a feasible option as if it works post-fix
    it should still work months/years/later pretty much the same right?
    Photo form. says to stain for 2 mins with fresh negs so I'm thinking
    maybe I should increase the stain to say..4 mins? I would just test
    this theory but I don't have any bunk negatives laying around.

    Also has anyone ever stained transparencies with Pyro? (agfa scala,
    for example- but color too!)

    ok #2:

    I moved out of my studio and am now doing the ol bathroom "in the tub
    with the curtain closed" loading for a while and I was being really,
    really sloppy as I was loading the roll I could start seeing the reel
    (AND the film!) as I was loading it (apx 100)...My initial reaction
    was f**k, but instead I accepted its potential fate and basically sat
    there until my eyes adjusted and it was damn clear the room wasn't
    dark. So I loaded the film into the tank and developed it rod 1:25
    5.5m 20c and it came out awesome, on par with any other time i've
    developed with this simple formula.

    I'm really scratching my head on this. Do I have super good vision or
    have I been under the wrong impression I need darkness to load film?
    :)


    Cheers,
    -sd
    http://www.zoom.sh
     
    Some Dude, Nov 13, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Some Dude

    Mike King Guest

    ----------
    Black and white/silver images could be bleached and stained--some
    intesifiers use this type of technology. Color is trickier since all you
    have left after processing is a dye image.
    Well, if you work fairly fast you're probably OK. Ambient light is
    non-directional and exposure at low levels is cumulative, and will first be
    evident as a slight overall fog. Have a nice sit in the darkroom before you
    load your next roll, last time I looked every bath has a nice "chair"
    provided :) and stop up the light leaks when they appear. I use rolled
    towels when I had to do it. You can also make temp covers for windows, fans
    and such.
    darkroommike
     
    Mike King, Nov 13, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. About two years ago I wrote a book review for PhotoVision Magazine
    about a chinese photographer that processed film in a bucket
    in a windowless hut by the light of a red paper lantern. (Anything is possible).

    If you compared a clear unexposed roll processed at the same time that
    would be an accurate way to evaluate wehther your roll was somewhat fogged.
    Unless the light was very strong and as Mike stated directional it will take a
    fair amount of abuse. My entry level B&W course took place in a trailer on
    campus the darroom where we off loaded our 35mm cassettes into tanks had a
    rather large hole in the ceiling tiles that produced the same sort of result you
    describe those negatives are still quite printable even relative to my more advanced
    and better work.
     
    Gregory W Blank, Nov 13, 2004
    #3
  4. Some Dude

    Tom Phillips Guest

    Film is far less sensitive to light than your eyes.
    Likely it just caused a bit of fog you printed through.
    In very dim light that eyes may adjust to and perceive, a
    relatively slow film (100 ISO or less) would likely require
    a longer exposure than the time it takes to reel load it
    to cause serious issues.
     
    Tom Phillips, Nov 13, 2004
    #4
  5. Some Dude

    Tom Phillips Guest

    Boy, some school administrater must have been cheaper
    than Jack Benny... ;) Even most community colleges and
    high schools I was familair with had real darkrooms.

    Course a trailer still beats a dark tent collodian
    folks used.
     
    Tom Phillips, Nov 13, 2004
    #5
  6. Nah and didn't mean to imply that:

    The photo program was very popular at my Community
    college. The program was excellent and one of the best in the
    area, probably still is (Knowing the who is in charge :)

    The Primary darkroom located in a real brick and stone building
    had/has about twenty enlargers a 16x 20 color processor and a
    communal island for B&W work. There was also a private darkroom
    that had two color 4x5 enlargers. They had two paper driers, and a
    photo studio outfitted with a 2400 ws Speedo system and studio stand
    for the camera , 4x5 cameras for student use. It was an awesome program
    at th community college level.

    Part of why I have done so well so far is the very high caliber of the local
    professional photographers that instructed thier. All are still
    currently working in photography or graphics at this point.
     
    Gregory W Blank, Nov 13, 2004
    #6
  7. Some Dude

    Tom Phillips Guest

    Still, they could have fixed the ceiling tiles ;>
    I had a prof (deceased now) who used to camp out in
    Bret Weston's living room...
     
    Tom Phillips, Nov 13, 2004
    #7
  8. I have used pyrogallol, catechol and hydroquinone (separately, not
    together) as an intensifier for negatives. Bleach the neg in a
    rehalogenating bleach ( a solution of ferricyanide and bromide like you
    would use for sepia toning). Wash it and redevolope in room light in
    staining developer. The simplest will be a teaspoon of hydroquinone and
    a teaspoon of sodium carbonate in a pint of water. Use it right away and
    develop till it won't develop any more. wash the negative. No need to
    fix it. Substitute catechol or pyrogallol for the hydroquinone for some
    different colors.

    If you are thinking about color transprencies, try Easter egg dyes.
     
    PATRICK GAINER, Nov 14, 2004
    #8
  9. I have used pyrogallol, catechol and hydroquinone (separately, not
    together) as an intensifier for negatives. Bleach the neg in a
    rehalogenating bleach ( a solution of ferricyanide and bromide like you
    would use for sepia toning). Wash it and redevolope in room light in
    staining developer. The simplest will be a teaspoon of hydroquinone and
    a teaspoon of sodium carbonate in a pint of water. Use it right away and
    develop till it won't develop any more. wash the negative. No need to
    fix it. Substitute catechol or pyrogallol for the hydroquinone for some
    different colors.

    If you are thinking about color transprencies, try Easter egg dyes.[/QUOTE]

    Hey don't rush the season,....its not christmas yet :)
     
    Gregory W Blank, Nov 15, 2004
    #9
  10. Some Dude

    Some Dude Guest

    Patrick thats an awesome idea with the easter egg dyes.


    awesome.

    Thanks


    Cheers,
    -sd
    http://www.zoom.sh
     
    Some Dude, Nov 18, 2004
    #10
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.