A few questions about my SRT201 - Lenses and Flash

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Lee Howard, Feb 1, 2004.

  1. Lee Howard

    Lee Howard Guest

    Hi all-

    I've been shooting away with my "new" SRT201. It was my mom's and 25
    years later she handed it down to me in almost perfect condition.
    She's also passed on 2 lenses - a 45mm Rokkor f2 MD and the 70-210
    Rokkor f4 MD Zoom. Both have been blowing me away. I've been
    shooting with a Minolta DiMage 7i 5mp digital for a couple of years
    now and the sharpness of these lenses is killing me. I'm not feeling
    too motivated to grab the digi lately...

    Anyhow, I'm still unsure of a few things so I thought I'd ask a few
    questions...

    1) I also inherited a Minolta Auto128 flash with the camera, but no
    instructions. I'm unsure of how to appropriately setup the camera's
    manual controls when preparing to use the flash. Is it just something
    you bracket for or is there science to it? Any help appreciated.

    2) Lenses - I've been wanting to shoot in ambient light more so I
    decided to buy a 50mm f1.2 MD lens of KEH. I chose the MD because
    it's "newer" so to speak and the coatings seem to be better from what
    I've read. Should I be more open, in the future, to the MC lenses?

    Also, the only other 2 lenses I see myself needing in the future for
    sure would be a wide-angle and a lens for portraits. I've read the
    100mm f2.5 Rokkor lenses are nice and make for good portrait lenses.
    Agreed? Any other choices to keep an eye out for? I get the
    impression there are a few of these Rokkor lenses that were just
    amazing, so I'd like to keep an eye out for those if possible. KEH
    has a great selection and I don't mind spending a little more $$$ just
    to know there will be no hastle re: proper quality grading and the
    like...

    Along those lines, are there any "golden" Rokkor wide angle models I
    should be looking out for?

    Sorry to bombard you guys with so many questions.

    Thanks in advance-

    Lee
     
    Lee Howard, Feb 1, 2004
    #1
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  2. very timely post. I am reading "collecting and using classic slrs" by
    Ivor Matanle,1997.

    At the time of writing the book he was using a Minolta SRT101 for most
    of his professional work.He was using the MC lenses. He does mention
    that he uses a Vivitar f2 24mm in a fixed Minolta mount. He does say
    the exposure meter of the SRT's is inclined to give electrical
    trouble, being the weak part of the SRT.(his words, not mine).

    Yours however has probably seen little use and should go for a long
    time!

    Since I recently bought my Nikon EM, it and my Olympus IS3DLX , have
    been getting all the work and my digital Olympus E10 is gathering
    dust! I've rediscovered the joy of film.

    Bill Mcdonald in Joshua Tree
     
    Bill Mcdonald, Feb 1, 2004
    #2
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  3. Lee Howard

    teren Guest

    Great camera, and great Minolta manual system.

    As for lenses, the MC 28 2.8 is very sharp. I like the tack sharpness
    on my 135 2.8 as well, however, the aperature ring is a bit odd.

    The MD refers to whether you can use the Program mode on the 'newer'
    X-700 et al bodies. The MC's (Celtics) are superb lenses and the
    prices are not necessarily cheaper. The 58 1.4, for example is a
    great portraiture lens, and a wonderful paperweight as well.

    Anyways, enjoy your 'new' camera, and make sure to stock up on some
    Wein cell batteries before they go away...

    Regards,
    Mteren
     
    teren, Feb 1, 2004
    #3
  4. Lee Howard

    Colyn Guest

    While digital is an excellent format, it still has a way to go before
    matching 35mm
    Flash sync on the Minolta is 1/60th or below. Use 1/60th for most if
    not all of your flash work

    Focus and transfer the distance indicated on the lens to the dial on
    the flash. and read the proper f-stop and set on the lens.

    Be sure to set the right film speed on the flash.
    A 50mm f/1.4 would have been a better choice since the 1.2 is more
    prone to flare..

    The orange Rokkor-X line (with Rokkor-X painted orange) of lens are in
    my opinion the best both MC and MD..
    The 85mm and 100mm are the best for portraits. Some people prefer the
    135mm..

    You can't go wrong buying from KEH.
    21, 28, 35, 50, 85 or100, 135, and 200mm are all you'll ever need..
    Try to stick with the Rokkor-X with 55mm filter thread that way you
    won't have to buy 2 or 3 different filter sizes..


    Colyn Goodson

    http://home.swbell.net/colyng
    http://www.colyngoodson.com
    http://www.colyngoodson.com/manuals.html
     
    Colyn, Feb 1, 2004
    #4
  5. Lee Howard

    Colyn Guest

    I have to disagree with his assessement since I have used SRT's since
    they were introduced in the 60's with no electrical problems
    whatsoever..

    I have modified my SRT's to use the silver oxide s76 battery and they
    are up to factory specs..

    The SRT uses a simple series circuit which is less prone to problems
    than the bridge circuit used on many other cameras of that generation.
    Go to http://home.pcisys.net/~rlsnpjs/minolta/recal.html for details.

    I also have a meter modification page at
    http://www.colyngoodson.com/minolta.html


    Colyn Goodson

    http://home.swbell.net/colyng
    http://www.colyngoodson.com
    http://www.colyngoodson.com/manuals.html
     
    Colyn, Feb 1, 2004
    #5
  6. The MC's (Celtics) are superb lenses and the
    I don't think the MC lenses are the same as Celtic lenses. MC was the
    designation for Minolta top-line glass before the MD line. The Celtic lenses
    were created to compete with Nikon's Series E stuff. The MC lenses were in
    no way at all produced as cheaply as Celtic lenses. That doesn't mean Celtic
    lenses are not good, but similar in build quality to the Series E stuff,
    perhaps a bit better. MC and MD lenses were the finest quality, but as
    previously noted, the MD mount could function on newer bodies with all the
    program automation.
    Ken>
     
    Ken Rosenbaum, Feb 1, 2004
    #6
  7. Lee Howard

    Colyn Guest

    Colyn, Feb 1, 2004
    #7
  8. Lee Howard

    Magnus W Guest

    I was under the impression that the "X" only was there to indicate that the
    lens in question was meant for the US market -- kind of like "Maxxum" vs.
    "Dynax" today... am I wrong?
     
    Magnus W, Feb 1, 2004
    #8
  9. Lee Howard

    Colyn Guest

    There is a misconseption that the Rokkor-X lens were meant for the US
    market and the Rokkor lens were meant for the Japanese and European
    market and is posted here by a person who will remain nameless but
    both versions were sold in the US with US warranty...

    I also bought new in Japan while stationed there a 200mm f/4 Rokkor-X
    with Japanese warranty..


    Colyn Goodson

    http://home.swbell.net/colyng
    http://www.colyngoodson.com
    http://www.colyngoodson.com/manuals.html
     
    Colyn, Feb 1, 2004
    #9
  10. Lee Howard

    Lee Howard Guest

    I actually had a lot of problems with the 1 wein cell I got so I
    ordered a MR-9 battery adapter from www.rolleicamera.com and it works
    like a charm now.

    :)
     
    Lee Howard, Feb 1, 2004
    #10
  11. Lee Howard

    Lee Howard Guest

    I actually had a lot of problems with the 1 wein cell I got so I
    ordered a MR-9 battery adapter from www.rolleicamera.com and it works
    like a charm now.

    :)
     
    Lee Howard, Feb 1, 2004
    #11
  12. Lee Howard

    Bob Hickey Guest

    About the flash; Sit somebody down whose wearing something black and white,
    like a black jacket and a T-shirt. Measure out exactly 12 feet. Load 100
    film. Set the shutter to 1/60. If the best shot: detail in both the black
    and the white areas comes out @ f8, then the Guide # is 100. If f4 then it's
    50, if f2, then it's 25. From then on, just guess the distance, divide
    into your GN, and set your aperture to that #. ie: GN/distance=aperture. If
    you find the manual, and Minolta says its GN is 100, but you like the
    results at 50, there's nothing wrong, use 50. Bob Hickey
     
    Bob Hickey, Feb 2, 2004
    #12
  13. Lee Howard

    Lee Howard Guest

    Colyn-

    Could you please explain more about "the 1.2 is more prone to flare"?
    I'm a little unsure of what this means to mean in the real world.
    What enviornments would this be an issue in? Low-light areas? All
    spaces? Is this a constant in f1.2 lenses or something that happens
    with this particular one? I've not read about this issue in all my
    reading about this lens, so I appreciate the info.

    Lee

    A 50mm f/1.4 would have been a better choice since the 1.2 is more
    prone to flare..
     
    Lee Howard, Feb 2, 2004
    #13
  14. Lee Howard

    Colyn Guest

    Flare is light scattering around between lens elements usually causing
    bright areas or streaking on the negative..

    With any large aperture lens especially the 50mm f/1.2, flare can be a
    problem mainly in bright light such as outdoors or if light stricks
    the front element at an angle. I've always preferred the 1.4 version
    since there is little chance of this.. However, any lens can suffer
    from flare if not used properly..

    Flare can be eliminated by using the proper lens hood though. In fact,
    it's a good idea to use hoods on all lens...

    As long as you use a hood and take proper precautions with this lens,
    you shouldn't have any problems..


    Colyn Goodson

    http://home.swbell.net/colyng
    http://www.colyngoodson.com
    http://www.colyngoodson.com/manuals.html
     
    Colyn, Feb 2, 2004
    #14
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