A Leica story

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by RichA, Jun 30, 2007.

  1. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : > : Well, then, how'bout "Salesman takes two hundred dollar bills out of
    : > : the cashier thingammy, then passes an ATM machine on his lunch break
    : > : and replaces them whan back?
    : >
    : > In the meantime, the company auditor shows up and counts the money in the
    : > till. So when the salesman gets back from lunch, he's arrested and led away in
    : > handcuffs.
    :
    : Does this really happen IRL? How can such raids be justified from a
    : purely economical standpoint? What does the company stand to gain
    : financially by spending money on flying auditing squads that can't be
    : accomplished by the standard "verify the till at the closing of every
    : day" procedure, which has to be done anyway?
    :
    : I mean, I know that the American corporate attitude versus the
    : employees isn't characterized by an overly amount of trust, but I
    : actually did believe that they were not to keen on spending money on
    : idle schemes.

    Er ... I may have been exaggerating just a *teensy* bit. In the spirit of this
    whole preposterous yarn, you understand. I didn't mean to be taken *quite*
    that literally!

    I understand how we (the USA) must look to foreigners these days. But for the
    time being, there's not much we (the people) can do about it. Most of us are
    at least trying to retain our sense of humor while we wait it out.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 30, 2007
    #21
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  2. RichA

    Pete D Guest

    Could be, but those jobs don't pay terribly well and as I said, being
    able to get first crack at such a deal may be a job perk. I've seen
    this in other companies that deal with luxury items. There is a large
    logistics company in Canada that did a study that showed it was
    cheaper to let their be a certain level of employee theft than to give
    raises to make their workers happy. The study they did showed that
    they got more satisfaction out of the thefts than a raise and were
    happier because of it.

    What utter twaddle Rich, even Canadians are not that stupid.
     
    Pete D, Jun 30, 2007
    #22
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  3. RichA

    Pete D Guest

    If he had done that here I would have sent him to the bank first, they have
    auto machines for counting coins.
     
    Pete D, Jun 30, 2007
    #23
  4. RichA

    Pete D Guest

    Agree, should be selling cameras in Brooklyn with the other scum there!
     
    Pete D, Jun 30, 2007
    #24
  5. RichA

    Jan Böhme Guest

    Yeah, but I didn't really think about politics, but about corporate
    culture. And there are some interesting differences between US-British
    corporate culture on one hand, and Japanese-Swedish on the other. The
    free firing inherent in Anglo-Saxon corporate cultures keeps employees
    on their toes, and also makes management much less hesitant to gamble
    when they hire - why, if an individual gamble doesn't pan out, you can
    just fire the bugger! OTOH, the system of "firing only by just cause"
    of Sweden and Japan makes employees feel more secure. The two most
    obvious gain for management with this is, first, that bad news are
    likely to reach it much quicker than if messengers of bad tidings
    risks - or only suspect that they might risk - their job by doing so.
    More secure employees also trust, not only management, but also one
    another more, and identify more with the company. As a consequence,
    employers share useful information much more freely than in a less
    secure work environment, where making oneself indispensable by
    accumulating exlusive knowledge is a workable strategy against ever
    getting the sack - although counterproductive for the company as a
    whole. Also, good employees are less likely to quit for a better offer
    elsewhere.

    The primary weaknesses in the Japanese-Swedish way of running things
    is that the consensual culture usually makes it take longer time to
    reach a decision, sometimes drastically so. Furthermore, the near
    impossibility of firing somebody just because you don't like them
    makes a company extremely leery of hiring anyone who looks that there
    might be a risk that they would somehow either rock the boat or
    underperform. This means that immigrants amd minorities have a tough
    time being hired at all. It also means that the companies tend to miss
    out on the potenially very best people - because the very best
    invariably rock the boat to some extent when they get on board. OTOH,
    the system doesn't seem to produce more intra-company loafers and
    parasites. What is missed by the absence of the power of the boot, is
    amply compensated by the social control that the employees exert
    themselves on one another. A cheater doesn't only cheat on his boss,
    but on his workmates as well. And they will let him know it if he
    does.

    So, the lower level of trust between management and employees in USA
    as compared to Sweden has nothing to to with the George W. Bush
    administration. It's part of how business and society in general are
    run in the two different countries, and have been run for quite a long
    time. And the respective systems have their advantages and
    disadvantages. But, as I said, no company anywhere on the globe is
    likely to elevate the level of distrust between management and
    employees to the point where the company actually loses money on it.

    Jan Böhme
     
    Jan Böhme, Jun 30, 2007
    #25
  6. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Sure it sounds stupid, but if the bottom line is spending as little as
    possible to get job done, then they let it happen.
    Does Fedex fire every employee without a university degree because
    things disappear from their loading docks?
    It all comes down to spending the least amount of money.
     
    RichA, Jul 1, 2007
    #26
  7. RichA

    Pete D Guest

    Sure it sounds stupid, but if the bottom line is spending as little as
    possible to get job done, then they let it happen.
    Does Fedex fire every employee without a university degree because
    things disappear from their loading docks?
    It all comes down to spending the least amount of money.

    If that is happening then I really do hope that that corporation fails just
    like Enron, bad ways of doing business rarely can be justified.
     
    Pete D, Jul 1, 2007
    #27
  8. RichA

    Alan Browne Guest

    Ironically, your choice of words very aptly illustrates what's wrong
    with USA perceptions of the world.
     
    Alan Browne, Jul 1, 2007
    #28
  9. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    Robert Coe wrote:
    :
    : > I understand how we (the USA) must look to foreigners these days.
    :
    : Ironically, your choice of words very aptly illustrates what's wrong
    : with USA perceptions of the world.

    If you're referring to my use of the word "foreigners", I mean, of course,
    foreign to me. Just as I am a "foreigner" to you. If your dialect of English
    differs from mine, as it well may, you may choose not to use the word in that
    context. But please don't intentionally misconstrue my use of it in order to
    make a broader point.

    The US is a big country with several competing world views. I assure you, for
    example, that my perception of the world is emphatically not that of George W.
    Bush.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jul 1, 2007
    #29
  10. RichA

    gerrit Guest

    At least I don't cheat and swear like you. Nor do I post under false names!

    Gerrit - who rarely carries more than $100 cash around
     
    gerrit, Jul 1, 2007
    #30
  11. RichA

    Pete D Guest

    When Douglas cashes hos dole check he has over $100, at least for a few
    minutes.
     
    Pete D, Jul 2, 2007
    #31
  12. RichA

    co840

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    $200 cash

    I attend many estate sales. Many accept cash only. Recently I attended one where the deceased left a substantial Leica collection of equipment. I went to the sale each of four days and spent well over $200 each day. I have seen buyers at these sales pull out well over $1,000 cash. When my sons graduated college I gave each of them a $100 bill and told them to always keep one in their wallet - that way they would never be broke in a bad situation. When the situation arose where I had the opportunity to purchase an entire camera collection, I had $4,000 in my pocket.Years ago an acquaintance of mine said "Cash is King." He is right.
     
    co840, May 11, 2010
    #32
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