A stupid mistake

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Robert Coe, Dec 1, 2012.

  1. Robert Coe

    Robert Coe Guest

    Late Thursday afternoon Cambridge, the city for which I work, suffered a
    widespread power failure that lasted for three or four hours. It was sort of a
    big deal, since it gets dark early this time of year, and street lights and
    traffic lights were out in large areas of the city. In a headline article the
    next day, the Boston Globe interviewed several passersby in Central Square,
    the area hardest hit, and one of them mentioned the smoke that was wafting
    through the square. The Globe reporter noted that it was unclear where the
    smoke was coming from.

    It was clear to me, though, because at one point I had stood twenty feet from
    a raging manhole fire as the Fire Department tried to jockey an engine into
    place to fight it. I was in the right place at the right time, but I had no
    camera. A picture could have been important, too, because the fire tended to
    belie the power company's official explanation that a relay had merely tripped
    while they were servicing a transmission line through the area.

    Normally I keep a camera (a Canon 50D) in my office at all times, in case
    something comes up. But on my Thanksgiving trip to visit my daughter in
    Philadelphia, I had brought the 50D along as a spare and hadn't gotten around
    to taking it back to my office. Any of you guys would have known better than
    to let that happen, and so should I. I won't make the mistake again,
    obviously, but I probably won't live long enough to see another such
    opportunity. A lesson learned too late, dammit.

    It occurs to me in retrospect that I should at least have tried one of my cell
    phone cameras. (I carry two.) But I doubt that the light was good enough to
    get anything decent.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 1, 2012
    #1
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  2. Robert Coe

    PeterN Guest

    Welcome to the club. I suspect that's happened to a lot of us.
     
    PeterN, Dec 1, 2012
    #2
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  3. Robert Coe

    philo  Guest



    I bet it's happened to everyone...
    however I would have used the cell phone...even with poor lighting
    there might have been something usable

    This reminds me, I better put my 35mm point and shoot
    back under my car seat.

    It's my fall-back in case I forget to bring a camera along
     
    philo , Dec 1, 2012
    #3
  4. Robert Coe

    Savageduck Guest

    At a bare minimum I have my G11 in the car, but then there are times
    all I have with me is my iPhone.
    Well the iPhone camera has an HDR mode which should deal with the light
    problem. I have found that in some bad light conditions the iPhone can
    produce a somewhat noisy, but usable image and with the built-in flash
    it will do just fine for documenting an even when it is all you have.

    Here are two iPhone shots, the bookcase taken quickly a few moments ago
    with little care, just for the purposes of this demo:
    https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/FileChute/IMG_0115w.jpg
    https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/FileChute/IMG_0331w.jpg
     
    Savageduck, Dec 1, 2012
    #4
  5. Robert Coe

    Savageduck Guest

    That was meant to read: "documenting an event..."
     
    Savageduck, Dec 1, 2012
    #5
  6. Robert Coe

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On 2012-12-01 06:16:33 -0800, Robert Coe <> said:
    :
    : > Late Thursday afternoon Cambridge, the city for which I work, suffered a
    : > widespread power failure that lasted for three or four hours. It was sort of a
    : > big deal, since it gets dark early this time of year, and street lights and
    : > traffic lights were out in large areas of the city. In a headline article the
    : > next day, the Boston Globe interviewed several passersby in Central Square,
    : > the area hardest hit, and one of them mentioned the smoke that was wafting
    : > through the square. The Globe reporter noted that it was unclear where the
    : > smoke was coming from.
    : >
    : > It was clear to me, though, because at one point I had stood twenty feet from
    : > a raging manhole fire as the Fire Department tried to jockey an engine into
    : > place to fight it. I was in the right place at the right time, but I had no
    : > camera. A picture could have been important, too, because the fire tended to
    : > belie the power company's official explanation that a relay had merely tripped
    : > while they were servicing a transmission line through the area.
    : >
    : > Normally I keep a camera (a Canon 50D) in my office at all times, in case
    : > something comes up. But on my Thanksgiving trip to visit my daughter in
    : > Philadelphia, I had brought the 50D along as a spare and hadn't gotten around
    : > to taking it back to my office. Any of you guys would have known better than
    : > to let that happen, and so should I. I won't make the mistake again,
    : > obviously, but I probably won't live long enough to see another such
    : > opportunity. A lesson learned too late, dammit.
    :
    : At a bare minimum I have my G11 in the car, but then there are times
    : all I have with me is my iPhone.
    :
    : > It occurs to me in retrospect that I should at least have tried one of my cell
    : > phone cameras. (I carry two.) But I doubt that the light was good enough to
    : > get anything decent.
    : >
    : > Bob
    :
    : Well the iPhone camera has an HDR mode which should deal with the light
    : problem. I have found that in some bad light conditions the iPhone can
    : produce a somewhat noisy, but usable image and with the built-in flash
    : it will do just fine for documenting an even when it is all you have.
    :
    : Here are two iPhone shots, the bookcase taken quickly a few moments ago
    : with little care, just for the purposes of this demo:
    : https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/FileChute/IMG_0115w.jpg
    : https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/FileChute/IMG_0331w.jpg

    Those are good, but even for the indoor one you had better light than I would
    have had. It was pitch dark by then, and the only light came from automobile
    headlights and the fire itself.

    Let's face it, Duck: I *have* to claim that the grapes would have been sour.
    Otherwise, it's two stupid mistakes instead of one! ;^)

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 1, 2012
    #6
  7. Robert Coe

    Mort Guest

    Hi,

    I always carry a good quality pocket camera with me; currently a Canon
    Powershot S-100, plus a spare battery and a spare SD card in my pocket.
    In addition to pix of friends and nice scenery, I've gotten numerous
    grab shots of unusual and/or newsworthy occurrences. These have included
    a supermarket fire, and a car that crashed halfway into the front door
    of a home. The wide end is f:2, there is a small built-in flash, and I
    can get decent pix up to ISO 1600.

    It has been said that the best camera is the one that you actually have
    at that moment.

    I have a friend who keeps a cheap disposable flash film camera in his
    car, in case of an accident where pix are needed for documentation.

    Regards,

    Mort Linder
     
    Mort, Dec 2, 2012
    #7
  8. Be one with the moment, grasshopper.
     
    Charles E. Hardwidge, Dec 2, 2012
    #8
  9. Robert Coe

    Robert Coe Guest

    : : > Late Thursday afternoon Cambridge, the city for which I work, suffered
    : > a widespread power failure that lasted for three or four hours. It was
    : > sort of a big deal, since it gets dark early this time of year, and
    : > street lights and traffic lights were out in large areas of the city.
    : > In a headline article the next day, the Boston Globe interviewed
    : > several passersby in Central Square, the area hardest hit, and one of
    : > them mentioned the smoke that was wafting through the square. The
    : > Globe reporter noted that it was unclear where the smoke was coming
    : > from.
    : >
    : > It was clear to me, though, because at one point I had stood twenty
    : > feet from a raging manhole fire as the Fire Department tried to jockey
    : > an engine into place to fight it. I was in the right place at the
    : > right time, but I had no camera. A picture could have been important,
    : > too, because the fire tended to belie the power company's official
    : > explanation that a relay had merely tripped while they were servicing
    : > a transmission line through the area.
    : >
    : > Normally I keep a camera (a Canon 50D) in my office at all times,
    : > in case something comes up. But on my Thanksgiving trip to visit my
    : > daughter in Philadelphia, I had brought the 50D along as a spare and
    : > hadn't gotten around to taking it back to my office. Any of you guys
    : > would have known better than to let that happen, and so should I.
    : > I won't make the mistake again, obviously, but I probably won't live
    : > long enough to see another such opportunity. A lesson learned too late,
    : > dammit.
    : >
    : > It occurs to me in retrospect that I should at least have tried one of
    : > my cell phone cameras. (I carry two.) But I doubt that the light was good
    : > enough to get anything decent.
    :
    : Be one with the moment, grasshopper.

    Thanks, waterbug; I'll try to keep that advice in mind.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 2, 2012
    #9
  10. Robert Coe

    Peter Guest

    Many years ago I hired a guide to take me on a bird photo canoe trip. As
    we got a a good spot I realized that my film was still in my car.
     
    Peter, Dec 26, 2012
    #10
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