Acros vs. Delta 100 vs. TMX

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Shawn Hedvat, Sep 16, 2003.

  1. Shawn Hedvat

    Shawn Hedvat Guest

    Hi All,

    I am shooting a lot of desert landscapes using FP4+ in 4x5 and Xtol 1:1.
    Although, I often used an orange filter, the highlight contrast is somewhat
    low. I noticed that my Delta 100 35mm negs have a better rendition of
    highlights. Now, I am considering switching from FP4+. I was wondering which
    way to go. Tonality and sharpness are my main priorities. If possible. I
    need an easy to print negative as I am on balance a so so printer.

    Thanks All.
    Shawn
    P.S. FP4+ in D76 1:1 was just awesome, a bit grainy even in 4X5. Can I
    just put a piece of flashed glass in the filter drawer of a DII enlarger and
    convert it to a diffusion enlarger? It would hide the grain a little bit
    better.
     
    Shawn Hedvat, Sep 16, 2003
    #1
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  2. EFKE KB25 developed in Edwal FG-7 1:15 (water).

    Geoff.
     
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Sep 16, 2003
    #2
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  3. Shawn Hedvat

    Shawn Hedvat Guest

    I want more separation. What EI and developer do you suggest? Do you feel
    that Acros is a sharper film than TMAX?

    Regards
    Shawn..
     
    Shawn Hedvat, Sep 17, 2003
    #3
  4. You can't have BOTH. Gradation has to give somewhere, or else the
    negative can't be printed.
     
    Michael Scarpitti, Sep 17, 2003
    #4
  5. Shawn Hedvat

    Frank Pittel Guest

    : Hi All,

    : I am shooting a lot of desert landscapes using FP4+ in 4x5 and Xtol 1:1.
    : Although, I often used an orange filter, the highlight contrast is somewhat
    : low. I noticed that my Delta 100 35mm negs have a better rendition of
    : highlights. Now, I am considering switching from FP4+. I was wondering which
    : way to go. Tonality and sharpness are my main priorities. If possible. I
    : need an easy to print negative as I am on balance a so so printer.

    : Thanks All.
    : Shawn
    : P.S. FP4+ in D76 1:1 was just awesome, a bit grainy even in 4X5. Can I
    : just put a piece of flashed glass in the filter drawer of a DII enlarger and
    : convert it to a diffusion enlarger? It would hide the grain a little bit
    : better.

    In my never humble opinion Tmax100 is the finest film on the market. Develop
    the roll film and the sheet film in Tmax-rs. In both cases dilute 1:9 and process
    at 75F. The non-existent grain and the tonality of the film has to be seen to be
    believed.

    While the film is tolerant of mis-exposure it is very sensitive to development.
    You need to be able control the development time and temperature accurately and
    agitate consistently. You will also want to run the film speed and development
    time tests to get the most out of the film.

    --




    Keep working millions on welfare depend on you
     
    Frank Pittel, Sep 17, 2003
    #5
  6. IMHO some explanation is in order. Although we think of silver based photogra
    phy as an analog medium it is better and more accurate to think of it as
    digital.

    Silver based photgraphy works on a simple chemical reaction, the individual
    molecules of silver either get exposed to light and turn black when developed
    or don't. So how do we get gray? Silver tends to be lumped in clusters called
    grains. Depending upon how much light hits a grain and how it is developed,
    some of it turns black, some does not.

    The original question asked for advice on choosing a film and developer
    COMBINATION that would yeild many shades of gray. This is called gradation.

    However, we run into a problem when we print a negative. The number of shades
    of gray we can get out of the little grains of silver in a sheet of print
    paper is far less than the the number of grays we can have in a negative.

    Print paper is sold in grades (or you can use a multigrade paper and adjust
    the grade). Grades are contrast levels. The human eye perceives them by
    contrast. Number 6 paper, which is just about black and white is perceived
    as sharp and clear. Number 0 paper is perceived as dull and lifeless.
    European grades are different than US grades. US papers run from 0-5,
    Euopean papers run from 1-6 with the US grade being equivalent to the next
    up European grade.

    A "normal" print would be done on US 2, or a Euro 3 paper and "looks
    just right" from a normal negative. A negative with too much gradation
    can be "improved" by using a higher grade paper, a negative that has too
    few grades can be "improved" using a lower grade.

    The traditional darkroom tricks of dodging (undersposing areas) and
    burning (overexposing) areas adjust the contrast by changing the exposure.
    In the end the paper can only show a limited number of grades (shades
    of gray) no matter what you do. Added on top of that the persective
    issues, you will find that no matter what you do with the negative,
    you'll never get what you want on paper, you'll always have to make
    a compromise.

    If you are interested in finding out exactly what that means, I suggest
    that you take your negatives and get a roll of film scanned. High resolution
    is not necessary, 1800x1200 (2mp) will be just right.

    Now load an image you like into a image modification program such as
    Photoshop (very expensive) or GIMP (free) and look at the image on the
    screen. By adjusting the contrast, etc, you can see the effects that
    would take many prints on paper.

    Once you have produced an image the way that you like, save it. I suggest
    that you print it on "photo quality paper" using color ink, so that you can
    adjust the color of the blacks. Most inkjet black ink is too magenta for
    my taste. Take the print with you into the darkroom as a goal to acheive
    or "better".

    Keep in mind that the idea is not to produce an exibition quality print from
    the computer, it's to give you a guide to work from.

    Geoff.
     
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Sep 17, 2003
    #6
  7. Shawn Hedvat

    Jytzel Guest

    I like the way Acros handles highlights more than TMX. EI 64, or even
    50. I Like it in HC110 dil. E.
     
    Jytzel, Sep 17, 2003
    #7
  8. Shawn Hedvat

    Shawn Hedvat Guest

    I am really interested in this combo. Does it work well in a rotary
    processor (i.e.. Jobo 2500 tank) ?
    Any suggested development times?
    Regards
    Shawn
     
    Shawn Hedvat, Sep 17, 2003
    #8
  9. Shawn Hedvat

    Sherman Guest

    Shawn,
    I use a Unicolor drum and motor base to develop TMX in TMax RS at 1:9 at 75
    degrees F. It works incredibly well. Rotary systems make processing this
    film consistently very easy and make adjustments for contrast control
    equally easy. A Jobo with its precise control of temperature should be even
    better.

    For starters I rate the film at full speed (100 ISO). For normal contrast I
    use 11 minutes 30 seconds at 75 degrees with the developer mixed 1:9. I use
    a five minute pre-soak before developing.

    The pre-soak helps equalize the temperature of the film and tank and it
    increases the development time. If you don't pre-soak you might have to
    shave a couple minutes from the development.

    Sherman
    http://www.dunnamphoto.com
     
    Sherman, Sep 18, 2003
    #9
  10. Shawn Hedvat

    Frank Pittel Guest

    It better work in a jobo processor since that's what I use!! :)

    As recommended by Jobo I start with a five minute prewash. This has a couple
    of effects beyond slowing the development. First it brings the tank and film
    up to temperature. Second it removes most of the purple anti-halation dye.

    For sheet film I use Tmax-rs I mix the gallon and use that as my "stock" and
    prior to use (usually during the prewash) I mix 135ml of stock with 135ml of
    water. I use a EI of 125 and an N development time of 12.5 minutes.

    For roll film I use Tmax that I mix just prior to use. I start with 24ml of
    concentrate and add water until I have 240ml of developer. I use a EI of 80
    and my N development time is 9.5 minutes.

    You're going to want to run your own tests but those numbers should get you
    started.

    Frank

    : I am really interested in this combo. Does it work well in a rotary
    : processor (i.e.. Jobo 2500 tank) ?
    : Any suggested development times?
    : Regards
    : Shawn


    : : > : Hi All,
    : >
    : > : I am shooting a lot of desert landscapes using FP4+ in 4x5 and Xtol
    : 1:1.
    : > : Although, I often used an orange filter, the highlight contrast is
    : somewhat
    : > : low. I noticed that my Delta 100 35mm negs have a better rendition of
    : > : highlights. Now, I am considering switching from FP4+. I was wondering
    : which
    : > : way to go. Tonality and sharpness are my main priorities. If possible. I
    : > : need an easy to print negative as I am on balance a so so printer.
    : >
    : > : Thanks All.
    : > : Shawn
    : > : P.S. FP4+ in D76 1:1 was just awesome, a bit grainy even in 4X5. Can
    : I
    : > : just put a piece of flashed glass in the filter drawer of a DII enlarger
    : and
    : > : convert it to a diffusion enlarger? It would hide the grain a little bit
    : > : better.
    : >
    : > In my never humble opinion Tmax100 is the finest film on the market.
    : Develop
    : > the roll film and the sheet film in Tmax-rs. In both cases dilute 1:9 and
    : process
    : > at 75F. The non-existent grain and the tonality of the film has to be seen
    : to be
    : > believed.
    : >
    : > While the film is tolerant of mis-exposure it is very sensitive to
    : development.
    : > You need to be able control the development time and temperature
    : accurately and
    : > agitate consistently. You will also want to run the film speed and
    : development
    : > time tests to get the most out of the film.
    : >
    : > --
    : >
    : >
    : >
    : >
    : > Keep working millions on welfare depend on you
    : > -------------------
    : >



    --




    Keep working millions on welfare depend on you
     
    Frank Pittel, Sep 18, 2003
    #10
  11. Shawn Hedvat

    Shawn Hedvat Guest

    Thanks for your kind reply. Tamx & Tmax Rs it is then..
    Regards
    Shawn
     
    Shawn Hedvat, Sep 18, 2003
    #11
  12. Shawn Hedvat

    Shawn Hedvat Guest

    Thanks again.

    Shawn
     
    Shawn Hedvat, Sep 18, 2003
    #12
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