Adobe Photo Deluxe Business Edition (copyright Hewlett Packard1999)

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Angelique Begnaud, Mar 14, 2014.

  1. A friend and I were going through a box of old computer
    things, when we saw an unopened shrink wrapped version
    of Adobe Photo Deluxe Business Edition that came with
    an HP Printer.

    It has a serial number on the package, but we didn't
    open the package or install.

    Just curious: Is it something useful?
     
    Angelique Begnaud, Mar 14, 2014
    #1
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  2. Angelique Begnaud

    Savageduck Guest

    Not any more it isn't. Adobe Photo Deluxe was one of Adobe's earliest
    and most primitive versions of their software. It only had some of the
    most rudimentary tools and was usually bundled with some scanners and
    printers in the mid-1990s through to about 2002.
    It was the forerunner to Adobe Photoshop LE which developed into
    Photoshop Elements.

    It is not likely to run on any of the recent operating systems. I am
    not sure if it is supported beyond Windows 2000 or Mac OS 7.
     
    Savageduck, Mar 14, 2014
    #2
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  3. Angelique Begnaud

    J. Clarke Guest

    If is from the 1990s and for Windows it should run on any current
    version.
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 14, 2014
    #3
  4. Angelique Begnaud

    Savageduck Guest

    Yup! I noted that it was 90's vintage.
    ....but one wonders, why bother given the advances in even the most
    rudimentary current editing software?
     
    Savageduck, Mar 14, 2014
    #4
  5. I would have thought so also.

    Is it something that you'd find useful if all you used otherwise
    was Irfanview, MS Paint, & Vicman photo editor?
     
    Angelique Begnaud, Mar 14, 2014
    #5
  6. That's the entire question.

    Is it something that you'd find useful if all you used otherwise
    was Irfanview, MS Paint, & Vicman photo editor free wares?
     
    Angelique Begnaud, Mar 14, 2014
    #6
  7. Angelique Begnaud

    Eric Stevens Guest

    It doesn't automatically follow. I have software (Photopaint) which
    won't run in W7/64 and needs an XP32 emulator. Although I've forgotten
    exactly what, I have had software which ran in W2000 but wouldn't run
    in XP32.
     
    Eric Stevens, Mar 14, 2014
    #7
  8. Angelique Begnaud

    David Taylor Guest

    On 14/03/2014 21:15, Eric Stevens wrote:
    []
    I take it you tried the compatibility settings for these programs?

    Alternatively, you are likely to get these programs to work using
    virtual machines and installing XP32 or Win-2000 inside the VM. Some
    versions of Win-7/64 come with an XP emulator, as mine does, and it
    works satisfactorily, including device drivers.
     
    David Taylor, Mar 15, 2014
    #8
  9. Angelique Begnaud

    J. Clarke Guest

    Generally speaking if it won't run on 64-bit windows it needs the 16-bit
    subsystem which Microsoft decided not to include in the 64-bit versions.
    Such software would be DOS-based or use the pre-Windows-95 APIs if it is
    for Windows.

    The other place where problems occasionally occur is with security--in
    each new release of Windows Microsoft has tightened the default security
    settings, so software that is quite capable of running on XP or Vista or
    7 or 8 doesn't because the writers made assumptions about the security
    settings that are no longer true or make their own settings that no
    longer work. When you run into one of those, the fix is generally to
    locate the folders it is using and first try setting the security to the
    system defaults and if that doesn't work then give system,
    administrator, and whoever needs to use it full access.
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 15, 2014
    #9
  10. Angelique Begnaud

    David Taylor Guest

    On 15/03/2014 16:46, J. Clarke wrote:
    []
    I've checked, and 16-bit program will run on an instance of XP running
    on a virtual machine under WIn-8.1 64-bit. There are examples of some
    early 32-bit programs using a 16-bit installer, although I can now
    remember which they were.

    An easy solution to programs like that is to install to a new directory:

    C:\Tools

    rather than C:\Program Files\, although that means you won't then get
    the extra security afforded by C:\Program Files\.
     
    David Taylor, Mar 15, 2014
    #10
  11. Angelique Begnaud

    J. Clarke Guest

    Yep, "XP mode" provides a virtual 32-bit machine complete with working
    16-bit subsystem.
    Or just open an elevated command prompt and:

    icacls "\program files\<foldername>" /t /grant everyone:(OI)(CI)(F)

    Which should grant full access to that folder and its contents to all
    users on the system.
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 15, 2014
    #11
  12. Angelique Begnaud

    David Taylor Guest

    On 15/03/2014 19:05, J. Clarke wrote:
    []
    ... but at the price of reduced security for /all/ programs, rather than
    just those which require it.
     
    David Taylor, Mar 15, 2014
    #12
  13. Angelique Begnaud

    Eric Stevens Guest

    They can't use compatability settings for operating systems which
    didn't exist at the time the programs were written.
    That's what I said.
     
    Eric Stevens, Mar 15, 2014
    #13
  14. Angelique Begnaud

    J. Clarke Guest

    No, just reduced security for that one program. The security level for
    the others is completely unchanged.
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 15, 2014
    #14
  15. Angelique Begnaud

    David Taylor Guest

    On 15/03/2014 19:58, Eric Stevens wrote:
    []
    Just for clarification, on my Windows-7/64 PC, compatibility settings
    include:

    Win-95
    Win-98/ME
    Win-NT 4.0/SP5
    Win-2000
    Win-XP SP2
    Win-XP SP3

    and later versions. I find it surprising that a program with "1999" in
    the copyright can't run under at least one of those options, and that
    your program which ran under Windows 2000 can't run under the Windows
    2000 option. Oh, well! You win some and lose some, I suppose.
     
    David Taylor, Mar 16, 2014
    #15
  16. Angelique Begnaud

    David Taylor Guest

    I misread your e-mail. I was wrong. Agreed. But I still prefer my
    option of using C:\Tools\ for such programs.
     
    David Taylor, Mar 16, 2014
    #16
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