Adobe Photo Elements 4 the software of choice?

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by shipping, Dec 29, 2005.

  1. shipping

    shipping Guest

    Is Photo Elements 4 the software of choice for the amateur dslr user? Or can
    you recommend something better?
     
    shipping, Dec 29, 2005
    #1
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  2. shipping

    piperut Guest

    This is just my experience. YMMV...

    There are a number of choices of software for photo editing, and
    organizing depending on your budget.

    For organizing, and basic photo editing I like PICASA2 from GOOGLE. It
    is free for non-commercial use. It will also allow you to resize your
    photos and export them fairly easy. It also works with your email
    program to email photos.

    If you have a limited budget, GIMP for Windows from
    http://gimp-win.sourceforge.net/ is GPL software. It works fairly
    nice, but I have problems making it print on some printers in Windows.
    I end up saving the corrected file and using PICASA2 to actually print
    the file.

    Adobe Photoshop Elements 2 came with my Canon Digital Rebel when I
    purchased it. It works fine. It is a couple years old now.

    I find I am doing more photo processing in Linux now, and using
    FL-Photo and GIMP in Linux. They work fine there.

    Cosmi has a $10 photo software that I don't recall the name of. It
    is fairly okay. It also comes with a scrapbooking program for the
    people that are into that. I actually picked it up for someone that
    was looking for a scrapbooking program, because at the time it was the
    only one I could find and it had a photo program with it. Office Depot
    has that one.
    It is a fairly good photo editor for the money. (Of course I had to
    check out the photo editor!) This is in the rack of cheap software at
    Office Depot in the CD size cases.
    I think I have also seen this same program at CompUSA, but I am not
    sure.

    The people who have the Kodak cameras are not real happy with Kodak's
    software.
    Canon's own software for processing photos is pretty lame.
    I had a Casio, and that software was fairly bad also.

    To create DVD's that play on your DVD player, I am using Roxio Media
    Creator. I have run into some problems with it. It has a 999 photo
    limit. I do not care for Roxio as a photo editor. I am trying to
    figure out QDVD author in Linux to accomplish this task, and having
    some luck, but not as much as I would like. (I can only get one audio
    file on a slide show right now, instead of an entire slide shows length
    of audio, and I maxed out the memory that was allocated for the program
    at around 700 photos. It doesn't have a limit set, just the amount
    of memory that is allocated to the program, and it crashed around 700
    photos.... I could most likely figure out some way to adjust the memory
    so it would do more photos if I really needed it to.)

    So there are a number of choices. You just have to find the one that
    works for you. In Windows, I like PICASA2, and if it is more complex I
    use GIMP. Beyond that I ask a Custom photo lab for help. I used to
    use Adobe Photo Elements 2, however I don't even have that loaded on
    my pc anymore. In Linux I use FL-Photo and GIMP, and beyond that ask a
    Custom Photo Lab for help. (Normally, if I am asking them for help it
    is something I am going to make a large print of ...something larger
    then 13x19, as that is what my printer will do, or something that I am
    entering into competition.)

    roland
     
    piperut, Dec 29, 2005
    #2
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  3. Full PhotoShop. Or Picture Window Pro, maybe. Depends on the kind of
    stuff you're trying to do and your personal style of working. I'm a
    heavy user of adjustment layers with layer masks myself; PhotoShop CS
    adding 16-bit adjustment layers is what finally moved me away from
    Picture Window Pro for nearly everything (the one remaining problem is
    how slowly Photoshop starts up).
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Dec 29, 2005
    #3
  4. No, Adobe CS2 is the software of choice for serious amateur dSLR
    users.


    ****************************************************

    "The booksellers are generous liberal-minded men."

    Samuel Johnson
    "Life of Johnson" (J. Boswell), Vol. I, 1756
     
    John A. Stovall, Dec 29, 2005
    #4
  5. shipping

    Fotografo Guest

    How about Corel Paint Shop Pro X? You can process RAW file format as
    well, for a fraction of the cost of PS.
     
    Fotografo, Dec 29, 2005
    #5
  6. shipping

    This old Bob Guest

    Elements 3 and 4 are so bloated it's not funny, like CS vs. CS2.

    Elements 2 is pretty fast for making quick changes and I use it a lot for
    quick stuff when loading CS or CS2 is overkill.
     
    This old Bob, Dec 29, 2005
    #6
  7. shipping

    nick c Guest

    I don't use PE 4 but PE 4 appears to be a very good photo processing
    program for amateur DSLR users who don't want to make a career of
    processing their photos. But for just about the same amount of money, I
    also think considering Corel's Paint Shop Pro X and Ulead's PhotoImpact
    11 might well be worth looking at too. I don't think Paint Shop Pro X
    (1) or PhotoImpact 11 (2) is as user friendly as Adobe's PE 4, but each
    gives you a bit more program usage options than PE 4. That's important
    to consider because your amateurish standing will change. The one big
    advantage Adobe PE 4 will have over the other programs is availability
    of third party filters. But now we're talking bigger bucks in spending.
    I use Adobe CS and would upgrade to CS 2 but many of my third party
    filters don't work in CS 2. Shame on Adobe, which may end up losing me
    as a user.

    (1) - Corel's Paint Shop Pro X appears to be a rehash of Jasc Paint Shop
    Pro 9, before Corel bought the program from Jasc. Corel added a user
    friendly palette to help amateurs understand the usefulness of the
    tools. This is a very good feature and well worth considering but the
    problem is the palette takes up a lot of area on the monitor.

    (2) - Ulead's PhotoImpact 11 has a lot of "Goodies" which allows for
    creative imaginations to cut loose. There's a lot of filter effects
    that's built into the program that can be used to easily add pizazz to
    photo's.

    Each of these programs might be available on a trial basis and you might
    well consider taking advantage of trying them out for about 30 days
    before buying.
     
    nick c, Dec 29, 2005
    #7
  8. What I am missing in the PSE (and gimp which I quite like) is full color
    management (including soft-proofing) and the lack of 16-bit editing.
    For me these features are not worth the price difference, YMMV...

    For printing I recommend the QImage - http://www.ddisoftware.com/qimage/
    There is enough color-management for the serious amateur trying to print
    on his photo-quality inkjet, including soft-proofing - it is just
    not so practical as the 'live-view' in the full PS.

    There is a promising open-source project too (a gimp fork)
    where the beta is scheduled soon - might be an interesting alternative
    for people wanting the color and 16-bits: http://cinepaint.movieeditor.com/

    Regards
     
    Stanislav Meduna, Jan 3, 2006
    #8
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