Advice needed: Cokin Type Filter Kit for Canon EOS 400d?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Donnie, Jun 17, 2010.

  1. Donnie

    Donnie Guest

    New here so go gently :)

    Right, had a film slr years ago, but kids etc knocked my activities on
    the head.
    Now, got a EOS 400d a few months ago with a 18-55 IS lens and have
    joined the local camera club this week.

    So, I've been reading "Digital Photography Techniques" and was
    interested in the article talking about neutral density filters etc.
    for landscape work
    Now I know i could buy the screw on circular filters (58mm for this
    lens) but that means solid non graduated filters as the lens and filter
    all move together.

    Hence if i want to use a graduated filter I need to use a filter
    holder. However, having never used one (and I don't even have a decent
    photo shop nearby to go look at) Im trying to get my head round how
    this would work in a practical situation.

    Now Im assuming I'd have to screw a ring into the lens (which currently
    has a protective UV lens in it) and then the holder clamps onto this?
    Then its obviously a case of composing your shot and setting the filter
    and holder up so that its lined up properly for your shot.

    Am I in the right ball park here?
     
    Donnie, Jun 17, 2010
    #1
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  2. Donnie

    Donnie Guest

    Cheers Garry it does.

    I think Im going to nip to Cambridge next week sometime as there's a
    couple of camera shops there I believe that I can have a look about

    Donnie.
     
    Donnie, Jun 17, 2010
    #2
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  3. Donnie

    Joel Guest

    I am not sure sure if it's a good idea to use filter on digital camera.
    Yes, when I was using film camera I did use those filters, and last time I
    looked at the old camera bag (2-3 years ago?) I saw I still have around 2
    dozens of those filters left (both Cokin type and regular round type
    filter). And I believe I had both 55mm and 58mm adapters.

    And I stopped using them right after switching to digital camera. First,
    because I started with P&S and the adapter won't work with P&S camera, then
    years later I upgraded to DSLR and forgot all about them until few years ago
    I cleaned up the old mess and saw them again.

    Oops! I forget, if it's the requirement for the class then it's a
    different story, else you can do the similar and more with Photoshop or
    similar.
     
    Joel, Jun 18, 2010
    #3
  4. Filters work with my Canon G9 and lens adapter, and similar kit.

    I've got one polarising filter. Got a built in ND3 filter so can get away
    with not buying another one. Tempted to get an infrared filter so I can take
    some funky woo-woo pictures.

    UV filters are a waste of time on digital as cameras have them built in over
    the sensor. Repurposing them as a lens protector is okay but if starting
    from scratch it's probably best just get a clear one.
     
    Charles E Hardwidge, Jun 18, 2010
    #4
  5. Donnie

    Tim Conway Guest

    A lot of things that used to be done with a filter can be done in Photoshop
    now with digital. Polarizers are different; a polarizer is still
    beneficial. If you're still interested in cokin filters, here's their
    website:
    http://www.cokin.com/ico1-p1.html
     
    Tim Conway, Jun 18, 2010
    #5
  6. Donnie

    Tim Conway Guest

    I agree. The P size is good for larger lenses with front filter threads 67
    or 77 mm whereas the A size won't cover them. Being able to just change
    adapter rings instead of complete filter sets is a definite advantage of the
    cokin system.
     
    Tim Conway, Jun 18, 2010
    #6
  7. Donnie

    Donnie Guest

    I know what people are saying about photoshop but I like the idea of
    getting it as right as possible "in camera" plus I don't have £600 odd
    for photoshop though I am thinking of getting a copy of elements 8
     
    Donnie, Jun 18, 2010
    #7
  8. Donnie

    Donnie Guest

    Yep, UK here :)

    I've had a look on 7day shop, I'd forgotten about that place but
    couldnt find the cokin style graduated ND filters :-(
    Bought a screw in polariser though while i was there :)
     
    Donnie, Jun 18, 2010
    #8
  9. Donnie

    Tim Conway Guest

    That's a good philosophy to have. It's always better to get it right from
    the start instead of having to "correct" matters later. ND grads are a big
    help to doing that. With white balance settings in digital cameras, though,
    color correcting filters are often unnecessary unless you want to add color
    to a sunset or do other special effects.
     
    Tim Conway, Jun 18, 2010
    #9
  10. Donnie

    Donnie Guest

    Bad form replying to self I know but just had another look and while
    the circular filters come up on a search for "neutral density" the
    graduated and cokin other ones only come up when searching for "ND"
     
    Donnie, Jun 18, 2010
    #10
  11. Donnie

    Joel Guest

    Way to go my man! as a professional photographer I can't afford making
    many error, so I always do "as right as possible" and my keeping is very
    high. And for insurance I still doing the old good habit of taking extra to
    make sure no axcuse at the end. Before large memory card available, I
    didn't just store to laptop or 1 portable storage *but* 2 portable storages.

    But it's so sad that digital camera without Photoshop (or similar) is
    almost no digital. So even I do agree with yout beautiful thought, but not
    impress.

    - DSLR with cheapie lens won't get you very far

    - DSLR without post processing skill won't get very far either

    - Good post processing skill with POOR image quality photo is a waste. You
    will be upset that you can't use your best skill on the poor quality photo.

    Me? I would chose P&S over DSLR with cheapie lens, and probably won't
    enjoy Photoshop as much, or I may switch to Lightroom or ACR for good.
     
    Joel, Jun 18, 2010
    #11
  12. I've bought stuff online from Morris Photo and offline from Bristol Cameras.
    They both sell the Cokin filter system. They're both established and
    reputable companies. Good service. Fast delivery.

    http://www.morrisphoto.co.uk/
    http://www.bristolcameras.co.uk/
     
    Charles E Hardwidge, Jun 18, 2010
    #12
  13. Donnie

    Donnie Guest

    Cheers for those, bookmarked for the future :)
     
    Donnie, Jun 18, 2010
    #13
  14. There's always a danger with talk about raw processors and image editors for
    people to get obsessive. It's only half a step away from my SLR prime lens
    colour calibrated dick is bigger than yours.

    We had a discussion in an earlier thread about getting it right versus
    post-processing but it doesn't seem to penetrate some minds. The genuine
    and artistic skill are issues.

    Almost any raw processor is good enough. I've even been thinking of
    developing one myself. Artistic skill with colour and creativity, and
    technocratic application level skill is something else.
     
    Charles E Hardwidge, Jun 18, 2010
    #14
  15. Donnie

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : > I know what people are saying about photoshop but I like the idea of
    : > getting it as right as possible "in camera" plus I don't have £600 odd
    : > for photoshop though I am thinking of getting a copy of elements 8
    :
    : Way to go my man! as a professional photographer I can't afford
    : making many error, ...

    Two observations:

    - I take Donnie for a woman. ("kids etc knocked my [photographic] activities
    on the head".)

    - If you're a professional photographer, I'm the President of the United
    States.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 19, 2010
    #15
  16. Donnie

    Robert Coe Guest

    : I know what people are saying about photoshop but I like the idea of
    : getting it as right as possible "in camera" plus I don't have £600 odd
    : for photoshop though I am thinking of getting a copy of elements 8

    You might want to try Digital Photo Professional, the better of Canon's two
    photo editors. If you bought your 400D new (unlikely, I suppose, since I don't
    think it's still in production), it should have included a CD with Canon's
    software on it. (You'll still have to go to their Web site and upgrade to the
    latest versions.) Otherwise, try to find a friend (or maybe a UK resident in
    this group) to give or lend you one. DPP isn't nearly as feature-rich as
    Photoshop, but it's free and a good learning vehicle. And it may turn out to
    be all you need.

    There are also several free photo editors available on the Internet, some of
    which have many enthusiastic adherents.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 19, 2010
    #16
  17. Donnie

    Joel Guest

    Take whatever you can take
    Be whatever you want to be. To me you are no less than a little jerk.
     
    Joel, Jun 19, 2010
    #17
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