Advice needed re outdated b/w films

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Mark Bishop, Oct 9, 2003.

  1. Mark Bishop

    Mark Bishop Guest

    I have been clearing up my photographic supplies and found a number of
    films I'd like some expert advice about. There are 3 lots that
    interest me:

    1. Ilford XP2 chromogenic film dated 09/03 and refrigerated throughout

    2. As above but kept at room temperature

    3. Ilford Delta 400 conventional film dated 09/03 and refrigerated
    throughout

    I have now put all of the films in the refrigerator. Which (if any)
    would you consider safe to use in late Nov/early Dec? All will be lab
    processed, right after use.
     
    Mark Bishop, Oct 9, 2003
    #1
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  2. Mark Bishop

    BG250 Guest

    B&W films are very stable because the lack of the complex color encoding
    chemistry involved.
    Besides, you are only out of date by a couple months according to your use
    dates. No need to refrigerate if you don't want.
    bg
     
    BG250, Oct 9, 2003
    #2
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  3. Mark Bishop

    Ed E. Guest

    I'm sure they'll be fine. Those expiration dates are usually *very*
    conservative.
     
    Ed E., Oct 9, 2003
    #3
  4. Mark Bishop

    Loren Coe Guest

    i have worked at Sac Peak Solar Observatory, NM, where in the 1980's
    they were using film out dated by decades. it was kept frozen and
    used for "flare patrol", a fairly not critical use for 35mm (90?)
    b&w film.

    the only gotcha was you had to develop it within a few hours of
    exposure to prevent degradation. if it sat 24hrs, it was toast.

    --Loren
     
    Loren Coe, Oct 9, 2003
    #4
  5. Now, that is something new to me, and very interesting.. Anyone on the
    group have some really old B&W film that has been kept frozen that they can
    use replicate Loren's observations of immediate developing versus delayed?
    Denny
     
    Dennis O'Connor, Oct 9, 2003
    #5
  6. Not quite the same situation, but years ago I finished up a roll in a
    camera I had put away sometime before, then got the film processed -
    E6. The portion that had been exposed was about a year old and the
    transparencies were all badly color shifted toward pink. The freshly
    exposed portions of the film were fine.

    The camera was neither refrigerated nor frozen during the period it housed
    the exposed film. :-> I wouldn't be surprised if the exposed film failed if
    not promptly exposed, although that short a time is surprising.
     
    Phil Stripling, Oct 9, 2003
    #6
  7. Mark Bishop

    Nick Zentena Guest


    No but I've pulled film out of old cameras after finishing the roll. The
    only real problem were the frames directly under the shutter. I'm not saying
    the other ones were perfect but easily printable. This for film that must
    have been in the camera well over 10 years.

    Nick
     
    Nick Zentena, Oct 9, 2003
    #7
  8. You should be OK on all of these. It's only October, but I'd use them ASAP.
     
    Michael Scarpitti, Oct 9, 2003
    #8
  9. Mark Bishop

    Hickster0711 Guest

    For the CV entry, I purposely used a roll of Tri-X outdated in "82, and a
    Rollei from "61. An attempt at authenticity. The film was fogged out beyond
    belief. But printable. The only thing that saved the shot was that it was
    raining, so there was a very narrow range of lite. Bob
    Hickey
     
    Hickster0711, Oct 10, 2003
    #9
  10. Mark Bishop

    Leicaddict Guest

    So basically, NONE of them are really outdated. Just store everything in the
    refrig until use, and remove and let come up to room temperature for @ an
    hour before loading. If you take several rolls, put those you don't use back
    in refrig. You know, you can go to Ilford's site and ask the experts. On the
    other hand, silliest question I've read in quite a while.
     
    Leicaddict, Oct 11, 2003
    #10
  11. Mark Bishop

    Leicaddict Guest

    Silliest answer I've read in quite a while, from a self proclaimed expert
    at that.

    --
    Leicaddict

    ASAP.
     
    Leicaddict, Oct 11, 2003
    #11


  12. Age dates are usually conservative, so he should be OK if he uses them
    very soon, provided he has stored them properly. As B&W film ages, it
    loses contrast and speed, and gathers fog from cosmic radiation.
     
    Michael Scarpitti, Oct 12, 2003
    #12
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