advice on a tripod?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Giff, Jan 29, 2014.

  1. Giff

    Giff Guest

    Hi guys,

    I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and
    started learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with
    the kit lens, 18-105.

    I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using
    the camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly
    and I am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get
    not the lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money,
    other than this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that
    the camera (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.

    Any tips appreciated.

    Thanks,
    G
     
    Giff, Jan 29, 2014
    #1
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  2. Giff

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2014.01.29, 16:36 , Giff wrote:
    > Hi guys,
    >
    > I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and
    > started learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with
    > the kit lens, 18-105.
    >
    > I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using
    > the camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly
    > and I am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get
    > not the lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money,
    > other than this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that
    > the camera (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    >
    > Any tips appreciated.


    The whole point is to avoid tips.

    Any entry-level Manfrotto is a good starting point. I still have 2
    190's here of different vintages (one is my SO's, actually). They are
    metal, relatively light ('cause they aren't very big).

    Indeed, look for a local camera swap meet (whatever it may be called)
    and you'll likely find a decent lovingly patina'd tripod. If it locks
    rigid, it's a good bet.

    You do need to decide on a head, the three usual types being:

    - pan (not all that great for still photography)
    - ball (very useful for most photography)
    - geared head (very good for landscape and portraiture - somewhat
    limited in vertical ability.

    Avoid cheap but you don't have to get the very best (such as Gitzo).

    Someone will pipe in with some adage to the effect that you're better to
    buy the best now and keep it for life rather than step your way through
    ever increasingly more expensive ones. YMMV.

    --
    “Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face.”
    - Mike Tyson
     
    Alan Browne, Jan 29, 2014
    #2
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  3. Giff

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 22:36:06 +0100, Giff <> wrote:

    >Hi guys,
    >
    >I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and
    >started learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with
    >the kit lens, 18-105.
    >
    >I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using
    >the camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly
    >and I am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get
    >not the lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money,
    >other than this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that
    >the camera (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    >
    >Any tips appreciated.
    >
    >Thanks,


    Tripods range from cheap to very expensive, and without a price range
    stated it's difficult to make a recommendation.

    I like, and use, a ball-head tripod. A pistol-grip ball-head would be
    preferable, but that ups the price considerably. I like a reversible
    center post for shooting straight down. I also like lever-snaps
    instead of friction-tightened devices on the legs. I use one with a
    quick release mount.

    The best way to choose one is to go to a camera store and handle them.
    For night shots in the city, and not for use in the wilds for nature
    photography, a lightweight tripod should be fine. If wind and rough
    terrain is not a factor, you just need something to steady the camera.
    You might try going around to the Goodwill and Salvation Army stores
    in your area. They always seem to have them for $5 or so. They're
    cheap ones, but you can get a tripod for $5 and use it long enough to
    know what features are important to you. Then spend a $100 or
    whatever.

    I bought 3 $5 ones from Goodwill. I used them as light stands with
    clip-on lights when I do indoor table-top photography.



    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 29, 2014
    #3
  4. Giff

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 16:56:30 -0500, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:

    >On 2014.01.29, 16:36 , Giff wrote:
    >> Hi guys,
    >>
    >> I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and
    >> started learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with
    >> the kit lens, 18-105.
    >>
    >> I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using
    >> the camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly
    >> and I am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get
    >> not the lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money,
    >> other than this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that
    >> the camera (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    >>
    >> Any tips appreciated.

    >
    >The whole point is to avoid tips.
    >
    >Any entry-level Manfrotto is a good starting point. I still have 2
    >190's here of different vintages (one is my SO's, actually). They are
    >metal, relatively light ('cause they aren't very big).
    >
    >Indeed, look for a local camera swap meet (whatever it may be called)
    >and you'll likely find a decent lovingly patina'd tripod. If it locks
    >rigid, it's a good bet.
    >
    >You do need to decide on a head, the three usual types being:
    >
    >- pan (not all that great for still photography)
    >- ball (very useful for most photography)
    >- geared head (very good for landscape and portraiture - somewhat
    > limited in vertical ability.
    >
    >Avoid cheap but you don't have to get the very best (such as Gitzo).
    >
    >Someone will pipe in with some adage to the effect that you're better to
    >buy the best now and keep it for life rather than step your way through
    >ever increasingly more expensive ones. YMMV.


    Not me. I recommend buying used and cheap first. It's only by using
    a tripod that you learn what features you need. It's the second
    tripod you buy that is the one where you spend the big bucks.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 29, 2014
    #4
  5. Giff

    Alan Browne Guest

    On 2014.01.29, 17:21 , Tony Cooper wrote:
    > On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 16:56:30 -0500, Alan Browne
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2014.01.29, 16:36 , Giff wrote:
    >>> Hi guys,
    >>>
    >>> I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and
    >>> started learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with
    >>> the kit lens, 18-105.
    >>>
    >>> I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using
    >>> the camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly
    >>> and I am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get
    >>> not the lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money,
    >>> other than this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that
    >>> the camera (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    >>>
    >>> Any tips appreciated.

    >>
    >> The whole point is to avoid tips.
    >>
    >> Any entry-level Manfrotto is a good starting point. I still have 2
    >> 190's here of different vintages (one is my SO's, actually). They are
    >> metal, relatively light ('cause they aren't very big).
    >>
    >> Indeed, look for a local camera swap meet (whatever it may be called)
    >> and you'll likely find a decent lovingly patina'd tripod. If it locks
    >> rigid, it's a good bet.
    >>
    >> You do need to decide on a head, the three usual types being:
    >>
    >> - pan (not all that great for still photography)
    >> - ball (very useful for most photography)
    >> - geared head (very good for landscape and portraiture - somewhat
    >> limited in vertical ability.
    >>
    >> Avoid cheap but you don't have to get the very best (such as Gitzo).
    >>
    >> Someone will pipe in with some adage to the effect that you're better to
    >> buy the best now and keep it for life rather than step your way through
    >> ever increasingly more expensive ones. YMMV.

    >
    > Not me. I recommend buying used and cheap first. It's only by using
    > a tripod that you learn what features you need. It's the second
    > tripod you buy that is the one where you spend the big bucks.


    See para starting with "Indeed" in my reply above.


    --
    “Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face.”
    - Mike Tyson
     
    Alan Browne, Jan 29, 2014
    #5
  6. Giff

    Giff Guest

    On 1/29/14 10:36 PM, Giff wrote:
    > Hi guys,


    Thanks Alan and Tony.
     
    Giff, Jan 30, 2014
    #6
  7. Giff

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 22:36:06 +0100, Giff <> wrote:
    : Hi guys,
    :
    : I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and
    : started learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with
    : the kit lens, 18-105.
    :
    : I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using
    : the camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly
    : and I am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get
    : not the lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money,
    : other than this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that
    : the camera (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    :
    : Any tips appreciated.
    :
    : Thanks,
    : G

    I find that it's pretty infrequent that I need a tripod, so I wouldn't
    recomment spending a lot of money. I think the advice you've gotten so far is
    good.

    I've bought a couple of Benro tripods (a tabletop and a full-size, both with
    ball heads) from B&H. They're sturdy, not too heavy, and relatively cheap.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Feb 1, 2014
    #7
  8. Giff

    Savageduck Guest

    On 2014-02-01 01:53:10 +0000, Robert Coe <> said:

    > On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 22:36:06 +0100, Giff <> wrote:
    > : Hi guys,
    > :
    > : I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and
    > : started learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with
    > : the kit lens, 18-105.
    > :
    > : I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using
    > : the camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly
    > : and I am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get
    > : not the lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money,
    > : other than this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that
    > : the camera (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    > :
    > : Any tips appreciated.
    > :
    > : Thanks,
    > : G
    >
    > I find that it's pretty infrequent that I need a tripod, so I wouldn't
    > recomment spending a lot of money. I think the advice you've gotten so far is
    > good.
    >
    > I've bought a couple of Benro tripods (a tabletop and a full-size, both with
    > ball heads) from B&H. They're sturdy, not too heavy, and relatively cheap.
    >
    > Bob


    I have a Manfrotto 3021B PRO with ball-head which for the most part
    stays at home.
    My goto, always available, tripod is my SLIK PRO 814 CF (carbon fiber)
    + ball-head, it has since been replaced in their inventory by the PRO
    824 CF.
    <
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/720717-REG/Slik_615_387_Pro_824_CF_4_Section.html
    >


    --
    Regards,

    Savageduck
     
    Savageduck, Feb 1, 2014
    #8
  9. Giff

    PeterN Guest

    On 1/31/2014 8:53 PM, Robert Coe wrote:
    > On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 22:36:06 +0100, Giff <> wrote:
    > : Hi guys,
    > :
    > : I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and
    > : started learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with
    > : the kit lens, 18-105.
    > :
    > : I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using
    > : the camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly
    > : and I am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get
    > : not the lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money,
    > : other than this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that
    > : the camera (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    > :
    > : Any tips appreciated.
    > :
    > : Thanks,
    > : G
    >
    > I find that it's pretty infrequent that I need a tripod, so I wouldn't
    > recomment spending a lot of money. I think the advice you've gotten so far is
    > good.
    >
    > I've bought a couple of Benro tripods (a tabletop and a full-size, both with
    > ball heads) from B&H. They're sturdy, not too heavy, and relatively cheap.
    >
    > Bob
    >


    Iuse mine primarily for landscape and birds. If I think a bird wil
    appear at a certain spot, I set up the tripod and prefocus. I am then
    able to sit comfortably in a chair with a remote. when I see the bird
    coming in, I watch until he arrives, then fire away.I cannot hand hold
    the camera with a telelens, for the time that it it may take until the
    bird arrives. My tripod is heavier than mot carbon fiber because I need
    the extra height.

    <http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/633397-REG/Cullmann_CU_55325_Magnesit_532C_Carbon_Fiber.html>

    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Feb 1, 2014
    #9
  10. Giff

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Sat, 01 Feb 2014 10:27:04 -0500, PeterN
    <> wrote:

    >On 1/31/2014 8:53 PM, Robert Coe wrote:
    >> On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 22:36:06 +0100, Giff <> wrote:
    >> : Hi guys,
    >> :
    >> : I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and
    >> : started learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with
    >> : the kit lens, 18-105.
    >> :
    >> : I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using
    >> : the camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly
    >> : and I am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get
    >> : not the lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money,
    >> : other than this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that
    >> : the camera (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    >> :
    >> : Any tips appreciated.
    >> :
    >> : Thanks,
    >> : G
    >>
    >> I find that it's pretty infrequent that I need a tripod, so I wouldn't
    >> recomment spending a lot of money. I think the advice you've gotten so far is
    >> good.
    >>
    >> I've bought a couple of Benro tripods (a tabletop and a full-size, both with
    >> ball heads) from B&H. They're sturdy, not too heavy, and relatively cheap.
    >>
    >> Bob
    >>

    >
    >Iuse mine primarily for landscape and birds. If I think a bird wil
    >appear at a certain spot, I set up the tripod and prefocus. I am then
    >able to sit comfortably in a chair with a remote. when I see the bird
    >coming in, I watch until he arrives, then fire away.I cannot hand hold
    >the camera with a telelens, for the time that it it may take until the
    >bird arrives. My tripod is heavier than mot carbon fiber because I need
    >the extra height.
    >
    ><http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/633397-REG/Cullmann_CU_55325_Magnesit_532C_Carbon_Fiber.html>


    I guess I'm cheap. Mine is an STX Pro62 with ball head and
    quick-release plate. Came with a nice case. A ball head, minimum, is
    essential to me.

    http://www.amazon.com/STX-Pro-62-Tripod/dp/B003U4LMXC


    I think I paid $99 for it, but Amazon has it now for $75.

    I've never felt I wish I had a better tripod. Of course, as I said, I
    don't do the type of photography where I go for long treks in the
    woods, have to position the tripod in difficult terrain, or been in a
    situation where conditions require a more sturdy tripod. Also, I
    don't have a particularly heavy camera and lens.

    I use it for group photos of the family (with me in the picture and a
    $6 remote shutter release), indoor table-top work, and some long
    exposures or when conditions require a shutter speed of less than
    1/60th.

    Lately, I've been using it for some video work with a small camcorder.

    The only feature I sometimes wish I had is a pistol grip ball-head.
    One of those that frees the movement when the trigger is held and
    locks it when the trigger is released. I borrowed one once, and it
    makes tracking things - like birds - much easier.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Feb 1, 2014
    #10
  11. Giff

    PeterN Guest

    On 2/1/2014 11:03 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
    > On Sat, 01 Feb 2014 10:27:04 -0500, PeterN
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 1/31/2014 8:53 PM, Robert Coe wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 29 Jan 2014 22:36:06 +0100, Giff <> wrote:
    >>> : Hi guys,
    >>> :
    >>> : I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and
    >>> : started learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with
    >>> : the kit lens, 18-105.
    >>> :
    >>> : I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using
    >>> : the camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly
    >>> : and I am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get
    >>> : not the lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money,
    >>> : other than this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that
    >>> : the camera (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    >>> :
    >>> : Any tips appreciated.
    >>> :
    >>> : Thanks,
    >>> : G
    >>>
    >>> I find that it's pretty infrequent that I need a tripod, so I wouldn't
    >>> recomment spending a lot of money. I think the advice you've gotten so far is
    >>> good.
    >>>
    >>> I've bought a couple of Benro tripods (a tabletop and a full-size, both with
    >>> ball heads) from B&H. They're sturdy, not too heavy, and relatively cheap.
    >>>
    >>> Bob
    >>>

    >>
    >> Iuse mine primarily for landscape and birds. If I think a bird wil
    >> appear at a certain spot, I set up the tripod and prefocus. I am then
    >> able to sit comfortably in a chair with a remote. when I see the bird
    >> coming in, I watch until he arrives, then fire away.I cannot hand hold
    >> the camera with a telelens, for the time that it it may take until the
    >> bird arrives. My tripod is heavier than mot carbon fiber because I need
    >> the extra height.
    >>
    >> <http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/633397-REG/Cullmann_CU_55325_Magnesit_532C_Carbon_Fiber.html>

    >
    > I guess I'm cheap. Mine is an STX Pro62 with ball head and
    > quick-release plate. Came with a nice case. A ball head, minimum, is
    > essential to me.
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/STX-Pro-62-Tripod/dp/B003U4LMXC
    >
    >
    > I think I paid $99 for it, but Amazon has it now for $75.
    >
    > I've never felt I wish I had a better tripod. Of course, as I said, I
    > don't do the type of photography where I go for long treks in the
    > woods, have to position the tripod in difficult terrain, or been in a
    > situation where conditions require a more sturdy tripod. Also, I
    > don't have a particularly heavy camera and lens.
    >
    > I use it for group photos of the family (with me in the picture and a
    > $6 remote shutter release), indoor table-top work, and some long
    > exposures or when conditions require a shutter speed of less than
    > 1/60th.
    >
    > Lately, I've been using it for some video work with a small camcorder.
    >
    > The only feature I sometimes wish I had is a pistol grip ball-head.
    > One of those that frees the movement when the trigger is held and
    > locks it when the trigger is released. I borrowed one once, and it
    > makes tracking things - like birds - much easier.
    >
    >


    Given the value of my camera and lenses, I gladly paid the extra money
    for stability. I bought a floor sample at a considerable discount. My
    old tripod is an old Leitz aluminum that I bought used. I changed
    because the old only only goes to 62", without raising the center
    column. I was breaking my back bending over, and raising the column made
    it subject to wind instability.

    --
    PeterN
     
    PeterN, Feb 1, 2014
    #11
  12. Giff

    dadiOH Guest

    "Giff" <> wrote in message
    news:lcbs82$6t8$
    > Hi guys,
    >
    > I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl
    > camera and started learning with it. It's a nikon D7100,
    > for the moment only with the kit lens, 18-105.
    >
    > I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod,
    > mainly for using the camera at night, e.g., in the city.
    > I see that prices vary greatly and I am not really sure
    > what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get not the
    > lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of
    > money, other than this, I just guess I'd want something
    > sturdy enough so that the camera (and possibly a heavier
    > lens in the future) would not fall.
    > Any tips appreciated.


    I used Gitzo for years and was going to suggest it until I looked at the
    current prices. My, God, they are INSANE!!



    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    Winters getting colder? Tired of the rat race?
    Taxes out of hand? Maybe just ready for a change?
    Check it out... http://www.floridaloghouse.net
     
    dadiOH, Feb 2, 2014
    #12
  13. Giff

    Ken Hart Guest

    "Giff" <> wrote in message
    news:lcbs82$6t8$...
    > Hi guys,
    >
    > I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and started
    > learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with the kit
    > lens, 18-105.
    >
    > I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using the
    > camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly and I
    > am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get not the
    > lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money, other than
    > this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that the camera
    > (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    >
    > Any tips appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > G
    >


    Generally, the fewer leg sections it has, the sturdier it will be. And, the
    bigger it will be!
    I am not a fan of "ball" type heads; I prefer one knob to pan, another knob
    to tilt. Just a personal preference.
    The legs should be long enough that you don't need to depend on the center
    coluum for more height.
    Check the manufacturer's specs for the weight of the camera and the biggest
    lens you anticipate getting in the future, and find a tripod that will
    support at least that much weight.

    --
    Ken Hart
     
    Ken Hart, Feb 4, 2014
    #13
  14. Giff

    Savageduck Guest

    On 2014-02-04 23:33:51 +0000, "Ken Hart" <> said:

    >
    > "Giff" <> wrote in message
    > news:lcbs82$6t8$...
    >> Hi guys,
    >>
    >> I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and started
    >> learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with the kit
    >> lens, 18-105.
    >>
    >> I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using the
    >> camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly and I
    >> am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get not the
    >> lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money, other than
    >> this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that the camera
    >> (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    >>
    >> Any tips appreciated.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> G
    >>

    >
    > Generally, the fewer leg sections it has, the sturdier it will be. And, the
    > bigger it will be!


    That is a bit of a generalization which is dependent on the quality of
    manufacture. The owners of expensive Gitzo tripods will probably
    testify that their units are plenty sturdy. Both my Manfrotto and my
    SLIK are extremely sturdy, even at extreme extension. I doubt if one
    could say that of Walmart budget tripods.

    > I am not a fan of "ball" type heads; I prefer one knob to pan, another knob
    > to tilt. Just a personal preference.


    That depends on the ball-head.

    > The legs should be long enough that you don't need to depend on the center
    > coluum for more height.


    Not always. Sometimes you have to used odd leg lengths and spread
    configurations due to uneven terrain, then being able to extend the
    center column more than the bare minimum and maintain stability is
    quite useful. This where a ball-head beats a pan-head every time.
    In a pure studio situation with level floor it is quite different.

    > Check the manufacturer's specs for the weight of the camera and the biggest
    > lens you anticipate getting in the future, and find a tripod that will
    > support at least that much weight.


    Yup!

    --
    Regards,

    Savageduck
     
    Savageduck, Feb 5, 2014
    #14
  15. Giff

    Tony Cooper Guest

    On Tue, 4 Feb 2014 16:03:50 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2014-02-04 23:33:51 +0000, "Ken Hart" <> said:
    >
    >>
    >> "Giff" <> wrote in message
    >> news:lcbs82$6t8$...
    >>> Hi guys,
    >>>
    >>> I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and started
    >>> learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with the kit
    >>> lens, 18-105.
    >>>
    >>> I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using the
    >>> camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly and I
    >>> am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get not the
    >>> lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money, other than
    >>> this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that the camera
    >>> (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    >>>
    >>> Any tips appreciated.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>> G
    >>>

    >>
    >> Generally, the fewer leg sections it has, the sturdier it will be. And, the
    >> bigger it will be!

    >
    >That is a bit of a generalization which is dependent on the quality of
    >manufacture. The owners of expensive Gitzo tripods will probably
    >testify that their units are plenty sturdy. Both my Manfrotto and my
    >SLIK are extremely sturdy, even at extreme extension. I doubt if one
    >could say that of Walmart budget tripods.
    >
    >> I am not a fan of "ball" type heads; I prefer one knob to pan, another knob
    >> to tilt. Just a personal preference.

    >
    >That depends on the ball-head.


    And also what is being photographed. Tracking - wildlife, for
    example, with the camera on a tripod with a ball head is much easier
    if the securing knob is large enough to lock down easily. However,
    I've never used a ball head with a heavy long lens, so I don't know
    how that affects things.

    If you are doing mostly landscapes and long exposures, the pan and
    tilt heads are probably just as good. I don't know what would make
    them better, though.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
     
    Tony Cooper, Feb 5, 2014
    #15
  16. Giff

    Savageduck Guest

    On 2014-02-05 01:45:10 +0000, Tony Cooper <> said:

    > On Tue, 4 Feb 2014 16:03:50 -0800, Savageduck
    > <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2014-02-04 23:33:51 +0000, "Ken Hart" <> said:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "Giff" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:lcbs82$6t8$...
    >>>> Hi guys,
    >>>>
    >>>> I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and started
    >>>> learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with the kit
    >>>> lens, 18-105.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using the
    >>>> camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly and I
    >>>> am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get not the
    >>>> lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money, other than
    >>>> this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that the camera
    >>>> (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    >>>>
    >>>> Any tips appreciated.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks,
    >>>> G
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Generally, the fewer leg sections it has, the sturdier it will be. And, the
    >>> bigger it will be!

    >>
    >> That is a bit of a generalization which is dependent on the quality of
    >> manufacture. The owners of expensive Gitzo tripods will probably
    >> testify that their units are plenty sturdy. Both my Manfrotto and my
    >> SLIK are extremely sturdy, even at extreme extension. I doubt if one
    >> could say that of Walmart budget tripods.
    >>
    >>> I am not a fan of "ball" type heads; I prefer one knob to pan, another knob
    >>> to tilt. Just a personal preference.

    >>
    >> That depends on the ball-head.

    >
    > And also what is being photographed. Tracking - wildlife, for
    > example, with the camera on a tripod with a ball head is much easier
    > if the securing knob is large enough to lock down easily. However,
    > I've never used a ball head with a heavy long lens, so I don't know
    > how that affects things.


    On both my Manfrotto and my SLIK I have the SLIK Pro 800 Ball Head.
    < http://www.slik.co.jp/slik_com/HE-BALL_HEAD_800.html >

    What I would love to have both for tripod and head would be the one of
    the "Really Right Stuff" offerings, but they are well out of my price
    range.
    < http://www.reallyrightstuff.com/s.nl/sc.26/category.567/.f >

    For a truly heavy long lens what is needed is a Wimberly gimbal mount head.
    < http://www.tripodhead.com/products/wimberley-main.cfm >

    > If you are doing mostly landscapes and long exposures, the pan and
    > tilt heads are probably just as good. I don't know what would make
    > them better, though.



    --
    Regards,

    Savageduck
     
    Savageduck, Feb 5, 2014
    #16
  17. Giff

    Tim Conway Guest

    "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
    news:2014020419205688260-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
    > On 2014-02-05 01:45:10 +0000, Tony Cooper <> said:
    >
    >> On Tue, 4 Feb 2014 16:03:50 -0800, Savageduck
    >> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2014-02-04 23:33:51 +0000, "Ken Hart" <> said:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Giff" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:lcbs82$6t8$...
    >>>>> Hi guys,
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I have recently started to lurk as I got myself a dsrl camera and
    >>>>> started
    >>>>> learning with it. It's a nikon D7100, for the moment only with the kit
    >>>>> lens, 18-105.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I'd like to get a small (i.e., not that tall) tripod, mainly for using
    >>>>> the
    >>>>> camera at night, e.g., in the city. I see that prices vary greatly and
    >>>>> I
    >>>>> am not really sure what to look for. I guess I'd be happy to get not
    >>>>> the
    >>>>> lightest one if that would save a considerable amount of money, other
    >>>>> than
    >>>>> this, I just guess I'd want something sturdy enough so that the camera
    >>>>> (and possibly a heavier lens in the future) would not fall.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Any tips appreciated.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thanks,
    >>>>> G
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Generally, the fewer leg sections it has, the sturdier it will be. And,
    >>>> the
    >>>> bigger it will be!
    >>>
    >>> That is a bit of a generalization which is dependent on the quality of
    >>> manufacture. The owners of expensive Gitzo tripods will probably
    >>> testify that their units are plenty sturdy. Both my Manfrotto and my
    >>> SLIK are extremely sturdy, even at extreme extension. I doubt if one
    >>> could say that of Walmart budget tripods.
    >>>
    >>>> I am not a fan of "ball" type heads; I prefer one knob to pan, another
    >>>> knob
    >>>> to tilt. Just a personal preference.
    >>>
    >>> That depends on the ball-head.

    >>
    >> And also what is being photographed. Tracking - wildlife, for
    >> example, with the camera on a tripod with a ball head is much easier
    >> if the securing knob is large enough to lock down easily. However,
    >> I've never used a ball head with a heavy long lens, so I don't know
    >> how that affects things.

    >
    > On both my Manfrotto and my SLIK I have the SLIK Pro 800 Ball Head.
    > < http://www.slik.co.jp/slik_com/HE-BALL_HEAD_800.html >
    >
    > What I would love to have both for tripod and head would be the one of the
    > "Really Right Stuff" offerings, but they are well out of my price range.
    > < http://www.reallyrightstuff.com/s.nl/sc.26/category.567/.f >
    >
    > For a truly heavy long lens what is needed is a Wimberly gimbal mount
    > head.
    > < http://www.tripodhead.com/products/wimberley-main.cfm >
    >
    >> If you are doing mostly landscapes and long exposures, the pan and
    >> tilt heads are probably just as good. I don't know what would make
    >> them better, though.

    >
    >

    I personally always liked the ball heads for wildlife and long lenses.
    However, on occasion a pan/tilt head has features that allowed me to get a
    shot that would have been very difficult otherwise.
    This shot of the clock at the gas station was taken with a camera reverse
    mounted on a pan/tilt head and then moved during the exposure. A ball head
    would have been a real problem to try to do this.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/s5ulukucl0rvxqk/Conway-deadlines.jpg

    Tim
     
    Tim Conway, Feb 9, 2014
    #17
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