Advice Please: Digital Camera For "Stop Motion"

Discussion in 'Amateur Video Production' started by Searcher7, Jul 26, 2005.

  1. Searcher7

    Searcher7 Guest

    I would like to do some experiments with "Stop-motion" photography, and
    want to create some short clips that I'll show on a big screen TV.

    Since it's stop-motion, I assume that I can get by without having to
    get a digital camera with a "high resolution", but can I get
    recommendations on what the minimum should be?

    Any editing that I may have to do will be done on my pc, so I was
    hoping that a direct connection between camera and pc, allowing
    immediate transfer of each frame, would be plausible.

    Any equipment advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks a lot.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
     
    Searcher7, Jul 26, 2005
    #1
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  2. Searcher7

    marks542004 Guest


    You need an image size of 720 x 480 pixels for standard NTSC tv.

    It is 30 frames per second but you can use the same frame several times
    depending on how smooth you want the animation.

    There are a number of utilities that will take a series of images and
    produce an avi video file. You need to number your images in sequence.
     
    marks542004, Jul 26, 2005
    #2
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  3. TYour best bet would be to buy a 5MPixel stills camera. Some you can
    do stop-motion captures via the firewire/usb-port. Or else, you fill
    the card, and download to your computer. You can go to a 35mm film-
    print then, if you manage to sell your project :)

    cheers

    -martin-
     
    Martin Heffels, Jul 26, 2005
    #3
  4. Searcher7

    Guest Guest


    Boinx software do stop motion applications www.boinx.com
     
    Guest, Jul 28, 2005
    #4
  5. Searcher7

    Searcher7 Guest

    Thanks.

    Any specific camera recommendations?(I thought 5mp would be over-kill
    for a project like this).

    Thanks again.

    Darren Harris
    Staten Island, New York.
     
    Searcher7, Jul 28, 2005
    #5
  6. Searcher7

    Mike Kohary Guest

    I don't have any specific recommendations, but as for the overkill comment,
    you might want to future-proof on a project like this. Yes, no TV today can
    display 5MP resolution, but that's just today. If you go with the bare
    minimum, you risk not being able to remaster with any improvement in the
    future. Also, if you should ever decide to put this project to film for
    display on a conventional film projector, you will want all of that 5MP and
    more.

    Since the price difference between a 5MP camera and, say, a 3MP camera is
    negligible, you may as well get all that you can. The couple of hundred
    bucks will be peanuts compared to the benefits it might give you down the
    road.
     
    Mike Kohary, Jul 28, 2005
    #6
  7. That's true what Mike says. See, I say 5MP, because you might make
    such a good product, that you want to print it out to 35mm. The
    storage of the raw footage won't cost you much (back it up on DVD's),
    and if you want to work just for tv, you can simply make the files
    smaller. You could also simply work with the smaller pictures (say
    tv-size), and with an editing program, do an online if you need to go
    to a higher resolution (HD, film, whatever), where you load the
    high-quality pictures again.
    There are a whole lot of good 5MP stills-camera's (just check-out
    http://www.dpreview.com or similar). You would need one with decent
    manual control, and little noise-output (in case you want to work with
    low light levels). If it has RAW-output, even better. You can grade
    the pictures with Photoshop, or for free with The Gimp, and assemble
    them simply with Virtualdub. See, except for the camera, this doesn't
    need to be a very expensive exercise.

    cheers

    -martin-
     
    Martin Heffels, Jul 28, 2005
    #7
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