Another net

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Tony Cooper, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Another statue from the Albin Polasek Museum and Sculpture Garden
    placed in a setting that the statue's pose seemed to suggest. This
    one was a bit more difficult since the statue's arm had to be
    re-positioned to accommodate the racket. I don't have the racket
    positioned right in his hand, though.

    I have too much time on my hands.

    http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/Current-Shots/i-4J6Sqk7/0/X2/2014-01-19B-X2.jpg
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 23, 2014
    #1
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  2. Tony Cooper

    sid Guest

    Tony Cooper wrote:

    Go finish tidying the cupboards in your garage!
     
    sid, Jan 23, 2014
    #2
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  3. Tony Cooper

    Ron Guest

    Too much time, yes. But while you're at it, make him cast a shadow on
    the court and you'll really have something. Very cute.
     
    Ron, Jan 24, 2014
    #3
  4. Tony Cooper

    PeterN Guest

    Yup! Try putting: the statue behind the net; the racket in his right
    hand, and the ball just coming up to the net, with a motion blur on the
    ball.
     
    PeterN, Jan 24, 2014
    #4
  5. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I posted this at Dgrin and the same comment was made. I've never
    tried adding a shadow, but there are tutorials on it. I'm not going
    to bother for something like this, but I would if I was trying to
    create a realistic scene.

    Here, I was just bored with the statue photos and practicing some
    basic skills.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 24, 2014
    #5
  6. Tony Cooper

    Sandman Guest

    Here's a tutorial I wrote on the subject way back:

    http://sandman.net/pages/3dskuggorMedPhotoshop?lang=en
     
    Sandman, Jan 24, 2014
    #6
  7. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Thanks. That's a well-presented tutorial. Good job.

    Unless I get extremely bored this afternoon, I'm not going to try to
    create a shadow for this composite. It was just a little exercise in
    making some rather dull shots into something a little more
    interesting.

    I bought an inexpensive video camera yesterday so my grandchildren can
    make movies, and I'm into a new project now: working with a software
    program to edit the movies.

    As a point of interest, but not intended as a point of contention,
    that tool in your tutorial is called a crescent wrench in the US and
    a monkey wrench in other countries.

    A monkey wrench in the US looks like this: http://tinyurl.com/9m2w7dw
    It's also called a "pipe wrench" here. The monkey wrench has notched
    and gripping jaws, but our Crescent wrench has smooth jaws.

    The US use of "crescent wrench" is from the popularity of the tool
    when introduced here, and made by, the Crescent company. Using the
    tool company's name for the tool is similar to calling an adjustable
    spanner a Bahco after Johan Johansson's company.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 24, 2014
    #7
  8. Tony Cooper

    Mayayana Guest

    | As a point of interest, but not intended as a point of contention,
    | that tool in your tutorial is called a crescent wrench in the US and
    | a monkey wrench in other countries.
    |
    | A monkey wrench in the US looks like this: http://tinyurl.com/9m2w7dw
    | It's also called a "pipe wrench" here. The monkey wrench has notched
    | and gripping jaws, but our Crescent wrench has smooth jaws.
    |
    | The US use of "crescent wrench" is from the popularity of the tool
    | when introduced here, and made by, the Crescent company. Using the
    | tool company's name for the tool is similar to calling an adjustable
    | spanner a Bahco after Johan Johansson's company.
    |

    I know his wrench as an "adjustable wrench" and
    think of a crescent wrench as a non-adjustable
    "spanner". But when I looked it up I see you're correct.
    I've never used the word spanner. But like you I do
    know monkey wrench as a synonym for pipe wrench.

    I guess that's all OK, just so long as you don't
    drink "soda" or "pop" instead of "tonic". :)

    http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/dialect/maps.html
     
    Mayayana, Jan 24, 2014
    #8
  9. Tony Cooper

    Sandman Guest

    Oh, I didn't know that. Thanks
     
    Sandman, Jan 24, 2014
    #9
  10. Tony Cooper

    PeterN Guest

    I filled multiple roles in my Army reserve unit, including motor
    sergeant. I once drove the lieutenant crazy when I requested that he
    requisition a left handed crescent wrench.
    BTW as much as I dislike Jonas's trolling, in this case he tried to be
    helpful, and your comment was unnecessary.
     
    PeterN, Jan 24, 2014
    #10
  11. Tony Cooper

    PeterN Guest

    Tanqueray goes well with tonic, provided ther is a lime on the glass.
    BTW, do monkeys pick their nuts with a monkey wrench?
     
    PeterN, Jan 24, 2014
    #11
  12. Tony Cooper

    Savageduck Guest

    I believe that is done with a monkey wench.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 24, 2014
    #12
  13. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I suggest you re-read what I wrote. I made a point of saying I was
    not intending to be contentious. I also made it clear that the tool
    is called one thing in this country, and another thing in Europe.
    He is correct for his usage, and I did not correct him for not using
    the term used in this country.

    I also thanked him for providing the tutorial and complimented the
    presentation.

    The "go get a left-handed..." is used in most, if not all,
    English-speaking countries. In the UK, it's "go get a left-handed
    spanner". I've also heard "go get a left-handed monkey wrench".
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 24, 2014
    #13
  14. Tony Cooper

    J. Clarke Guest

    It's actually more complicated than that.

    The original "monkey wrench" was like this:
    <http://search.yahoo.com/search?p=monkey+wrench&ei=UTF-8&fr=moz35>

    Note that the jaws do bear some resemblance to a rather stylized drawing
    of a monkey.

    Later there were two developments, the Crescent wrench, like the one
    that you used, that is more compact and can be used with one hand, and
    the Stillson wrench <http://www.hisltd.co.uk/Rothenberger-Stillson-Pipe-
    Wrench.html> that is designed for gripping pipe and other round stock
    but has a superficial similarity of appearance.

    The Crescent would get the "monkey wrench" appellation due to similarity
    of function to the original, while the Stillson would get it due to
    similarity of appearance.

    The original "monkey wrench" has pretty much fallen into disuse in the
    US, and the Crescent-type wrench is generally called a "Crescent
    wrench", leaving the Stillson to be called a "monkey wrench" on
    occasion, however "pipe wrench" is a less ambiguous term.
     
    J. Clarke, Jan 24, 2014
    #14
  15. Tony Cooper

    J. Clarke Guest

    Believe it or not, there is a such a thing as a left-handed Crescent
    wrench. The adjuster had a reverse thread. Whether this is due to
    Chinese incompetence or to intent I have no idea.
     
    J. Clarke, Jan 24, 2014
    #15
  16. Tony Cooper

    Sandman Guest

    The URL was to just a general search on Yahoo, which may or may not show
    the same items for me as for you. The only resemblence I found was this
    image:

    http://tinyurl.com/phvzz7o

    Which, incidentally, is of the kind of wrench I used in my tutorial.
    I'm not arguing with that, but I fail to see the similarities between the
    Stillson and a monkey, but I suppose I'm just missing something obvious :)
    While I'm sure it's used here in Sweden, I think a more common wrench is
    what we call Rörtång, or "pipe pliers", which look like this:

    http://tinyurl.com/npmrq4d

    As you can see, it has a similar funciton to what you call monkey
    wrench.
     
    Sandman, Jan 24, 2014
    #16
  17. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I am left-handed, but the only left-handed tool that I use is my
    Skilsaw (circular saw) because I move it with my left hand and want
    the line I'm cutting on to be visible. With a standard, or
    right-handed, circular saw the line is covered by the plate if I move
    the saw with my left hand.

    I have no problem using a standard crescent or pipe wrench, and no
    problem using standard scissors. With scissors, I've learned to
    adjust my thumb pressure to keep the blades in contact. I've tried
    left-handed scissors, but they're awkward for me because I have to
    re-adjust the thumb pressure.

    I spent my working career in the specialty medical equipment field.
    They do make left-handed hemostats and needle holders, but I never had
    a call for them. A hemostat or a needle holder has a ratchet-lock
    that is designed for right-handers, but it's easy to adjust to that
    thumb pressure that pushes instead of pulls.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 24, 2014
    #17
  18. Tony Cooper

    Hactar Guest

    A left-handed monkey/crescent/adjustable/pipe wrench is theoretically
    possible by having a left-handed thread on the adjuster. I've never seen
    or heard of one outside of a joke, but there it is. A left-handed Allen
    wrench or striped paint, I don't think so.
     
    Hactar, Jan 24, 2014
    #18
  19. Tony Cooper

    PeterN Guest

    PeterN, Jan 24, 2014
    #19
  20. Tony Cooper

    Savageduck Guest

    Yup! That you did.
    *spanner* is very much an Anglo term seldom used in the USA as in the
    UK and UK influenced countries, where it is used to cover a whole bunch
    of tools we give different names to here. Show most British any of the
    following; an "open ended wrench", a "box wrench", a "crescent wrench",
    or "monkey wrench" and he will identify any of them as a spanner,
    usually without differentiation other than specific size. He might call
    what we know as a "Crescent wrench", an "adjustable spanner", or a
    'monkey wrench/pipe wrench" a "pipe spanner".

    The only fields where I have heard the term "spanner" used for a tool
    in the USA has been for some watchmaker's tools, and for some
    photographic lens repair tools. Even then, so that the American mind
    can understand that they are tools, they will call them
    "spanner-wrenches". Though there might be some other US users who might
    speak of "spanners".
    <
    http://www.micro-tools.com/store/P-SP-SET/Spanner-Wrench-Set-3-Piece-Economy.aspx
    That you did.
    Very much the same as the "left-handed phillips screwdriver". It is a
    standard prank to pull on a novice in many trades.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 24, 2014
    #20
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