Another net

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Tony Cooper, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. Tony Cooper

    Savageduck Guest

    It has nothing to do with appearance. It has to do with word & worker
    associations and the age it came into being. There are several pieces
    of word origin mythology some of which are not factual and some which
    are conjecture.
    The myth not supported by fact is the idea that "monkey wrench" was
    derived as a play on words using the name of a supposed inventor of the
    tool, one "Charles Moncky" as a source. However, this has been proven
    to be fabricated myth as there is no patent record as there is for
    Daniel Stillson & Loring Coes.

    A more likely origin lies in 19th century slang usage of the word
    "monkey" and how it was applied to workers doing repetitive work seen
    as beneath the more privileged. Among those workers would be boiler and
    sewerage workers, and plumbers all trades seen as inferior by
    "gentlemen" employing only "monkeys". In those days a pipe wrench would
    be conspicuous in its use by any of those tradesmen, hence a wrench
    used by "monkeys". There would never be a need for a "gentleman" to
    know what any tool was properly named.
    The term "monkey" for those engaged in trades supporting the lifestyles
    of the rich and famous evolved in the 20th century when an auto
    mechanic was called a "grease monkey".
    Perhaps I should have said "similar" tool made for a similar purpose,
    rather than same tool.
    Yup! that is how it works.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 25, 2014
    #41
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  2. Tony Cooper

    Eric Stevens Guest

    -- snip --
    I certaintly can't hope to correct the usage of the whole of the US,
    not all on my own. I don't even think two of us can do it. :)

    From a very early age I was taught that the name 'monkey wrench'
    comes from the similarity of the adjustable jaw to a monkey climbing a
    tree - see
    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/31088803/Monkey Wrench.jpg

    More recently (like 50 years ago) I began to wonder if there is some
    earlier common root which gave rise to the names of both monkey
    wrenches and a pile drivers monkey (the weight which is hoisted up and
    then dropped on the pile). The pile driving monkey is hoisted up the
    piling rig in very much the same way that the adjustable jaw of the
    monkey wrench (the original type) climbs up the handle of the wrench.
    You want to try walking past a Hong Kong camera store carrying a
    camera without a lens filter! You don't even have to go into the place
    before you are hijacked.

    -- snip --
     
    Eric Stevens, Jan 25, 2014
    #42
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  3. Tony Cooper

    J. Clarke Guest

    I think that I am guilty of not making myself clear. The wrench that
    (IMO) bears a resemblance to a monkey is this one
    <http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d0/Monkey_wrench_deriva
    tive_from_Rogers_1903_p172.png>

    I did not mean to imply that the Stillson resembles a monkey. My intent
    was that due it its jaw moving roughly parallel to the handle and being
    adjusted with a screw roughly parallel to the handle, it was similar in
    layout to the one that looks like a monkey and so was associated with
    it.
     
    J. Clarke, Jan 25, 2014
    #43
  4. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Well, the jaws are notched or serrated or whatever you want to call
    it. That allows the jaws to grip the pipe.

    A monkey wrench has a long handle, so leverage adds to the function.
    The slip jaws allow the jaws to be re-placed over the pipe without
    adjustment or tightening, and reversing the motion allows them to
    loosen easily.

    The pipe pliers Jonas linked to are called "Lockjaws" or "Locking
    Pliers" here, but I've never personally seen a pair that large.
    Smaller ones are pretty standard in our workshops. I think mine are
    8".

    I imagine the market has decreased for monkey wrenches since lead pipe
    is seldom used anymore, and most pipe joints are glued instead of
    connected by screw threads. Still, I have one that gets use for
    various tasks.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 25, 2014
    #44
  5. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 25, 2014
    #45
  6. Tony Cooper

    Savageduck Guest

    ....and so the mythology of word origins based on conjecture continue.
    There are quite a few ideas which have been kicked around. As to which
    is closest to the true origin, I can only guess.

    I can remember when it used to be (or might still be) the same way in
    Time Square.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 26, 2014
    #46
  7. Tony Cooper

    Savageduck Guest

    Use a pipe wrench on "lead pipe"?
    Surely (I didn't call you Shirley), you mean cast iron, steel, or
    galvanized pipe which is used today in boiler rooms, power
    plants(including nuclear), and marine engine rooms as we speak. The use
    of PVC pipe with glued joints in a stationary engineering application
    is a little silly. Lead pipe with its low melting point would be just
    as silly in a steam plant/boiler room application. It was the
    industrial revolution and the need to build and maintain steam powered
    factories and such which lead to the development of the tools such as
    the pipe wrench needed for such building & maintenance, and they are
    still used today, that is why they are still sold.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 26, 2014
    #47
  8. Tony Cooper

    Eric Stevens Guest

    It's more than that. If you look at the wrench in
    http://www.virax.com/uploads/photo/012535.jpg you will see that the
    adjustable jaw and nut are carried in a frame which is attached to the
    handle via pivot pin. The idea is that when the operator pulls on the
    handle, the serrated jaw on the end of the handle clamps down onto the
    pipe it is already gripping. There is no way you can get it to grip
    sufficiently tightly merely by tightening the nut.
     
    Eric Stevens, Jan 26, 2014
    #48
  9. Tony Cooper

    Eric Stevens Guest

    You would never use those on lead pipe! You would squash it flat (or
    at least, out of shape).
     
    Eric Stevens, Jan 26, 2014
    #49
  10. Tony Cooper

    Eric Stevens Guest

    Right on.
     
    Eric Stevens, Jan 26, 2014
    #50
  11. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I plead "Thinko". I actually know pipes are not made out of lead, but
    "lead" came to mind before any other non-plastic material.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 26, 2014
    #51
  12. Tony Cooper

    Eric Stevens Guest

    Eric Stevens, Jan 26, 2014
    #52
  13. Tony Cooper

    PeterN Guest

    PeterN, Jan 26, 2014
    #53
  14. Tony Cooper

    Eric Stevens Guest

    Eric Stevens, Jan 26, 2014
    #54
  15. Tony Cooper

    Savageduck Guest

    Lead pipes were the Roman water pipe solution. Plumbing/plumber is
    derived from the Latin "plumbum" for lead. Iron, then galvanized, and
    copper and brass pipe was used to replace traditional Roman lead
    plumbing when it was discovered the Romans were poisoning themselves
    with the water delivered via lead pipe. Today a mix of copper and PVC
    pipe is used in home construction. There are few places you will find
    lead pipe used today.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 26, 2014
    #55
  16. Tony Cooper

    PeterN Guest

    PeterN, Jan 26, 2014
    #56
  17. Tony Cooper

    PeterN Guest

    On 1/25/2014 9:07 PM, Savageduck wrote:

    I grew up in an old apartment house, where the pipes were soldered. I
    thought my parents stupid for telling me never to use hot water from the
    faucet for drinking. It took me a while to realize that the pipes were
    soldered, and that lead from the solder wa more quickly dissolved in hot
    water, than cold.
    As I got older, my parents got smarter.
     
    PeterN, Jan 26, 2014
    #57
  18. Tony Cooper

    Eric Stevens Guest

    On Sat, 25 Jan 2014 20:49:32 -0500, Tony Cooper

    --- snip ---
    Lead used to be common in plumbing where fancy shapes ahd to be used,
    particularly in sanitary work.

    See http://www.schaffrath.net/photos/pipe_view_2.jpg for a toilet
    waste pipe.
     
    Eric Stevens, Jan 26, 2014
    #58
  19. Tony Cooper

    Eric Stevens Guest

    That's what comes from drinking from the hot water pipes.
     
    Eric Stevens, Jan 26, 2014
    #59
  20. Tony Cooper

    Eric Stevens Guest

    So was my response.
     
    Eric Stevens, Jan 26, 2014
    #60
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