Another Nikon firmware upgrade

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by ASAAR, Nov 22, 2008.

  1. ASAAR

    ASAAR Guest

    ASAAR, Nov 22, 2008
    #1
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  2. ASAAR

    Paul Furman Guest

    I'd like an update that returns some functionality available in the D200
    to the D700. The non-cpu lens data is restricted on the D700 to 9
    presets which must be reprogrammed to access in the quick list. The D200
    only saved one aperture per focal length but you could flip through all
    the available focal lengths with the rear dial, with their last-used
    apertures, and change the aperture for the current focal length with a
    twist of the front dial. That's with the extra button in front assigned
    to non-cpu lens data. Now on the D700 both dials merely scroll through
    the 9 presets and you have to menu dive to change the aperture for that
    focal length and overwrite to add an 10th focal length.

    I used it for getting EXIF data right with extension tubes & lenses
    lacking aperture linkage. And I do have more than 10 non-cpu lenses <g>
    even a zoom.

    I suppose it's their punishment for not getting a D3 but jeeze, less
    functionality than a D200 for twice the price? Otherwise I'm happy but
    that bugs me. Does the

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Nov 23, 2008
    #2
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  3. ASAAR

    Robert Coe Guest

    : I'd like an update that returns some functionality available in the D200
    : to the D700. The non-cpu lens data is restricted on the D700 to 9
    : presets which must be reprogrammed to access in the quick list. The D200
    : only saved one aperture per focal length but you could flip through all
    : the available focal lengths with the rear dial, with their last-used
    : apertures, and change the aperture for the current focal length with a
    : twist of the front dial. That's with the extra button in front assigned
    : to non-cpu lens data. Now on the D700 both dials merely scroll through
    : the 9 presets and you have to menu dive to change the aperture for that
    : focal length and overwrite to add an 10th focal length.
    :
    : I used it for getting EXIF data right with extension tubes & lenses
    : lacking aperture linkage. And I do have more than 10 non-cpu lenses <g>
    : even a zoom.
    :
    : I suppose it's their punishment for not getting a D3 but jeeze, less
    : functionality than a D200 for twice the price? Otherwise I'm happy but
    : that bugs me. Does the

    What they can do in firmware is constrained by the amount of space on the
    firmware chip. The D700's firmware may have to do more, relative to the
    available memory, than that of the D200 did. Punishing you for not stepping up
    to a D3 may be an incidental, even unintentional, side effect of the space
    constraint.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Nov 23, 2008
    #3
  4. ASAAR

    RG Guest

    I'm about ready to upgrade from the D200 to the D300 as well. I'm curious
    about one thing. I'm a heavy user of the autobracketing feature on the
    D200. I was disappointed to see Nikon remove the dedicated BKT button. As
    I understand it, the customizable button on the lower front of the body is
    typically now used for the autobracketing function. Are you much of a user
    of that function, and if so, do you find it any less convenient to use than
    with the D200?

    Russ
     
    RG, Nov 23, 2008
    #4
  5. ASAAR

    Paul Furman Guest

    I'm only familiar with bracketing when I accidentally turn it on by
    bumping the switch on the D200 and it takes me 3 hours to figure out
    what's going on with the exposure compensation :) Spot meter is another
    that got set accidentally and drove me batty figuring out exposures :)



    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Nov 23, 2008
    #5
  6. ASAAR

    ASAAR Guest

    Possibly more than you, Beserkerwitz, and that's not counting my
    SB-800s and older Nikon speedlights. I've already downloaded the
    firmware but will wait a bit before upgrading. If you have an
    SB-900 and want the firmware upgrade but would rather not download
    it from Nikon USA, Nikon Europe has it at :

    [Windows]

    http://nikoneurope-en.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/nikoneurope_en.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=26129

    [Macintosh]

    http://nikoneurope-en.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/nikoneurope_en.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=26130
     
    ASAAR, Nov 23, 2008
    #6
  7. ASAAR

    ASAAR Guest

    I'm surprised that you didn't pounce on an SB-900, after all it's
    bigger and more expensive than your SB-800s. It even zooms further
    than the SB-800 to provide much better, tighter coverage for your
    long (> 400mm) lenses. Just the ticket for capturing handheld
    nighttime snapshots of your pet fauna fertilizing your flora.

    They may say, but I say that the next 50mm f/1.4 Nikkor will be
    less like the Noct Nikkor than the new Sigma 50mm f/1.4, aka the
    Baby SigMonster.
     
    ASAAR, Nov 23, 2008
    #7
  8. ASAAR

    Jurgen Guest

    Unless this firmware fixes the SB900s tendency to switch itself off
    after 10 shots when used in rapid fire mode (3 frames PS with a Fuji s5)
    that speedlite is a dud anyway.

    No room for a 5th battery to ease the problem like the SB800 has and
    using a remote battery pack only gives you a few extra frames. A serious
    flaw in Nikon's top of the range flash.

    Metz (as usual) saves the day by having none of these 'issues'.
     
    Jurgen, Nov 23, 2008
    #8
  9. ASAAR

    ASAAR Guest

    This has been well discussed, and the SB-800 and SB-900 (as well
    as most other hotshoe flash brands/models) have the same thermal
    limitations. The SB900's shuts down sooner when its Thermal Cut-out
    setting is "On". When it's set to "Off" it behaves like the SB-800,
    but even when off, has the advantage of a multi-stage overheating
    indicator in the LCD display which the SB-800 lacks. If you want to
    see a speedlight *really* shut down quickly, try shooting rapid
    bursts using lithium AA cells instead of NiMH.

    There's no need for 5th AA cell since the SB-900 has shorter
    recycle times using 4 AA cells than the SB-800 has using 5.

    # AA cells: SB-800 x 4AA SB-800 x 5AA SB-900 x 4AA
    sec's/cycle
    Alkaline 6 sec. 5 sec. 4 sec.
    NiMH 4 sec. 2.9 sec 2.3 sec
    Lithium 7.5 sec. 7.5 sec 4.5 sec

    It may have none of these non-issues, but Metz flashes and Metz
    itself have plenty of significant issues. See :


    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1020&message=29878717

    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1020&message=29870643

    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1020&message=30005954

    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1020&message=29934581
     
    ASAAR, Nov 23, 2008
    #9
  10. ASAAR

    Eric Stevens Guest

    Sounds just the thing for my new 420mm f2.8 P&S :)


    Eric Stevens
     
    Eric Stevens, Nov 24, 2008
    #10
  11. ASAAR

    ASAAR Guest

    There ya go again with your weight based valuations. I neither
    need nor want any 3 pound battery bricks. I'll leave those to you
    and Joe McNally.

    That, right there, is its main weakness, only $0.49. And only a
    50 yard reach to boot. B&H has the solution that can put an end to
    all of your portable light cravings. It'll illuminate objects
    hundreds of yards away and fry others that are too close. It also
    has the weight only a Rita could love, nearly 5 pounds. If the
    internal battery run time is too short for your purposes (8 hours)
    there's an optional 10' cable that you can use to hook it up to an
    auto battery. Be the first on your block to get Surefire's
    Hellfighter, only $7,399 while they last.


    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/583389-REG/Surefire_HF1A_KIT01_HellFighter_Searchlight.html
     
    ASAAR, Nov 24, 2008
    #11
  12. ASAAR

    Jurgen Guest

    There is very little point in Nikon selling a professional grade flash
    that won't perform like one, is there?

    My new Metz (which I shouldn't have needed to buy) might take a little
    longer to recycle but it keeps working when the shooting is critical. I
    can't for the life of me understand Nikon putting out the SB900 in it's
    present form.

    Probably why a high proportion of paparazzi use Canon gear. I can't
    remember my Canon 580EX flash ever doing this. I never lost a critical
    shot because the flash decided to shut down "to protect itself".

    There is no point at all in having a short recycle time if the flash
    won't keep firing. The SB800 shuts down too but not as quickly as the
    SB900.

    Yes, the Metz is not a high recycle flash but it is a continuous use
    one. Walking around with a bag full of ice packs to periodically dump
    your flash into is not my idea professional gear.

    I don't have any regrets with the cameras but I have serious doubts
    about the so called "Professional" accessories Nikon sell.

    The links you point to have little or no relevance to a photographer who
    needs to continuously use a flash I have none of the issues referred to
    in those links with my 58 AF-1. Of course I've never spoken to a Metz
    representative either so being lied to is hardly a relevant issue.

    The simple fact is Nikon make a powerful flash that prematurely shuts
    down without warning in the viewfinder that it is about to overheat. I
    lost several critical and expensive shots because of this piece of crap
    and your attempt to defend Nikon for producing it only shows you don't
    rely on their gear for a living.
     
    Jurgen, Nov 24, 2008
    #12
  13. ASAAR

    Mark Thomas Guest

    Gee, thank heavens this sort of thing only happens to a select few
    'professionals'. Sensible pro's tend to test their equipment thoroughly
    and make sure it is suitable for the intended use, as well as always
    having backup equipment. For more details, look up 'common sense',
    'systems analysis', 'risk management', 'project management'.

    There's an old saying about people who blame their tools.. But I'm sure
    there is an interesting story behind these shots you lost, that fully
    justifies your anguish.


    By the way, has anyone seen D-Mac lately?
     
    Mark Thomas, Nov 24, 2008
    #13
  14. ASAAR

    ASAAR Guest

    You wouldn't know one if it bit you on the butt.
     
    ASAAR, Nov 24, 2008
    #14
  15. ASAAR

    ASAAR Guest

    Leaving a trail of blinded ex-photographers with charred hair and
    eyebrows if they're not careful. It was tried a century ago but
    didn't last long. It was, as they say, but a flash in the pan. And
    the effective range was considerably less than 150 feet. But try it
    out and see for yourself - it's pretty simple to make, less to use :
    http://www.geocities.com/mbarel.geo/m_flash.html

    Sounds like fun, while it lasts . . .
     
    ASAAR, Nov 24, 2008
    #15
  16. ASAAR

    Jurgen Guest

    Had I known what a disrespectful idiot you are... You'd have been gone
    forever much earlier than now.

    Plonk!
     
    Jurgen, Nov 24, 2008
    #16
  17. ASAAR

    Jurgen Guest

    There's also an old saying about fools that come to mind reading your
    rubbish.

    Join my Bozo bin with asaar. You both look like you deserve each other.
     
    Jurgen, Nov 24, 2008
    #17
  18. ASAAR

    Mark Thomas Guest

    Why didn't you stay on topic and answer the issues, 'Jurgen'?

    Here, I'll ask again for anyone else who might be reading this, as D-Mac
    (sorry, I mean 'Jurgen') won't see it of course:

    What type of 'pro' goes out with an untested flash, and then blames *it*
    for losing "several critical and expensive shots", in a situation he
    won't elaborate on?
     
    Mark Thomas, Nov 24, 2008
    #18
  19. It's a camera hot shoe flashgun.

    You get faster recycling by having bigger heavier batteries, and you
    get away from the continuous use overheating limitations by having a
    bigger heavier duty tube with some kind of heat sinking. That's more
    size and weight than can be accomodated on a camera hot shoe. That's
    why I wouldn't consider a hot-shoe flash a professional grade
    flash.

    No amount of whizzo electronics can make something compromised by the
    need to be lightweight and small into a serious professional machine.
     
    Chris Malcolm, Nov 25, 2008
    #19
  20. ASAAR

    J. Clarke Guest

    Whine whine whine whine whine. Why don't you sell your SB-900 to
    someone who has some self-discipline and get another Metz if you hate
    it so much?
     
    J. Clarke, Nov 25, 2008
    #20
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