Ansel Adams - Yosemite

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Alan Browne, Apr 26, 2008.

  1. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    Alan Browne, Apr 26, 2008
    #1
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  2. Alan Browne

    er Guest

    ---------------------------------------------------

    Alan,

    Thanks for posting this. Assuming this is your first trip;

    Yosemite is, without a doubt, one of my favorite places on the entire
    planet. I first visited when I was 13 or 14, camping with my grandparents.
    I had just discovered photography, and was traveling with an old folding 620
    film camera. I'd love to find those negatives, and see exactly what I shot.

    Now, with business taking my wife and I to San Francisco every August, we
    always set a few days aside at the end, and drive back to the NW by way of
    Yosemite.

    If you've never been there before, and are up for a couple of hikes, I'd
    recommend the Vernal/ Nevada Falls circle, and the Sentinal Dome/Taft Point
    hike. The falls hike is long, but not terribly strenuous, the dome and
    point hike is short, and mostly flat.

    If you are driving, not to be missed is the trip out the east side of the
    park over Tioga Pass. Views are great, and the road is an experience. At
    the end of the road is a gas station/gift shop/restaurant with food that is
    up to REALLY fine restaurant standards. Don't believe me, google "whoa
    nellie deli."

    Have a great trip.

    EQR
     
    er, Apr 26, 2008
    #2
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  3. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    I managed to get three nights of High Sierra camps booked, although I
    wasn't in the original lottery. Perhaps high gas prices have spooked
    some people out. This involves one easy hike and one more punishing. I
    may need to get a mule to haul gear, but the logistics/rules for that
    are a bit off v. our reservations. Our hike out will be over 20 km (but
    mostly downhill).

    (Note: now that maps.google.com includes "terrain" it makes studying up
    a lot easier. I also ordered maps from USGS and have a couple more to get).
    All in the plan. But now SO wants to add the Grand Canyon which would
    put a serious crimp on our schedule.
    No such thing as scenic overkill.
    Will do .. thanks for the tips.

    Cheers,
    Alan.
     
    Alan Browne, Apr 26, 2008
    #3
  4. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    We'll spend one night in the Curry Village area and then our hiking will
    be north of the 120 along the Tuolumne towards Hetch Hetchy and some
    high areas.
    Thanks for that last tip. My SO and I really don't like much of the
    fare available by the American road. Way too much fat and carbs. We'll
    hit the WND on our way to Mono.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Apr 26, 2008
    #4
  5. Alan Browne

    Ray Fischer Guest

    You should note that the area around Tuolumne (that's four syllables,
    BTW) meadows is at a wheeze-inducing 7,000 ft. Tioga pass tops out at
    10,000 feet. Hikes are a little more strenuous than at sea-level.
    Figure 2-3 days just to drive out to the Grand Canyon from Yosemite.
    Mammoth is okay but nothing I'd drive a longs ways to see. The Ghost
    town of Bodie is in the area but it's a day's trip. Mono lake can be
    cool but the tufa that stood in the lake are shrinking. More water is
    being allowed to flow into the lake.

    Also in the area is Death Valley. A different kind of scenery, to be
    sure, but just as dramatic.
    The hardest part of shotting Yosemite valley is conveying the sheer
    scale of the mountains. El Capitan is a sheer vertical cliff that's
    thousands of feet high. It's one thing to stand there and be
    surrounded by such things but getting photos is hard.

    Plan ahead.
     
    Ray Fischer, Apr 26, 2008
    #5
  6. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    Tuolumne is closer to 8000' actually, but the first hike will be fairly
    level and short (about 8 km).

    I'll be at the nautilus 3 / wk for full work outs plus the brutal stair
    climber from May 1 on ... (the "brutal" stair climber they have breaks
    in an odd way that makes "climbing" extra strenuous).
    DV is on the agenda. GC is a possibility that I'll try to cool my SO on.
    Long foregrounds with convergence to the base of a tall object help get
    the scale right. Not all scenes are conducive to this.
     
    Alan Browne, Apr 26, 2008
    #6
  7. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    What part of "SO wants" do you not get? ;-)

    My "Happiness" is at stake.
    Forewarned is...
     
    Alan Browne, Apr 26, 2008
    #7
  8. Alan Browne

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Grand Canyon is, without a doubt, way cool, but it's a serious drive
    and once you're there you'll want to spend time there. I'd plan a
    separate trip - maybe even consider a rafting trip down the Colorado.

    I visited Death Valley last summer (late July) for a day and my kids
    are STILL annoyed with me. Daytime temperatures were around 115 and
    nightime cooled down to 85 just before dawn. The heat will kill you
    if you're stupid. But I had fun.
    During the summer there are often climbers on El Capitan, but you need
    at least binoculars and preferably a telescope to see them. People
    just get lost on the scale of the mountains.
     
    Ray Fischer, Apr 26, 2008
    #8
  9. Alan Browne

    er Guest

    --------------------------------------------------------------

    Interesting parallels here.

    This August, after business in San Francisco, we've decided to forego our
    usual time in Yosemite, and simply drive through to 395, then down through
    Death Valley, across to Zion, then to North Rim Grand Canyon. From there,
    we are crossing Utah to Mesa Verde. Our usual week's trip home is
    stretching to two this year.

    Expect to see some arches along the way too.

    Somebody mentioned Bodie, sort of in passing. It's a pretty neat, well
    preserved ghost town at the end of a long rough road, but worth the trip -
    ONCE.

    I have some neat shots of the tuffa on Mono Lake from two years ago. It's
    right there at the end of the Tioga Pass highway, so I'd recommend stopping
    if only for a few shots.

    EQR
     
    er, Apr 27, 2008
    #9
  10. Alan Browne

    er Guest

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Not sure what you mean by "ring the changes."

    Out of curiosity, I did a Mapquest plugging in the Donner Pass route, and
    it's a bit longer, both time and distance than the route through Yosemite.
    Then, I simply plugged in San Francisco to Lee Vining, and Mapquest routed
    me over Sonora Pass. About an hour less than the route through Yosemite.
    Never taken that route before. Do you know it?

    Right you are about the flies at Mono Lake. We encountered Gazillions of
    them, but they were really only a minor annoyance. Would have been worse if
    we were barefoot, or wanting to wade into the lake.

    EQR
     
    er, Apr 27, 2008
    #10
  11. Alan Browne

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On 2008-04-27 00:11:33 -0700, "er" <> said:
    :
    : >
    : >> Good route. Though if you are skipping Yosemite you might want to try
    : >> getting to 395 via Tahoe to ring the changes so to speak.
    : >>
    : >> With Mono Lake visits the thing to remember, is the brine flies can
    : >> really spoil a visit in mid to late Summer.
    : > -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    : >
    : > Not sure what you mean by "ring the changes."
    :
    : All I meant by "ring the changes" was to provide a change from the
    : route you are familiar with. Certainly taking 80 over Donner Pass to
    : the North of Tahoe will be the longer route.
    : I was thinking of 50 through Sacramento on to South Lake Tahoe and
    : Carson City to meet 395 there.
    : >
    : > Out of curiosity, I did a Mapquest plugging in the Donner Pass route,
    : > and it's a bit longer, both time and distance than the route through
    : > Yosemite. Then, I simply plugged in San Francisco to Lee Vining, and
    : > Mapquest routed me over Sonora Pass. About an hour less than the route
    : > through Yosemite. Never taken that route before. Do you know it?
    :
    : I can see that MapQuest or some other guidance system might route you
    : that way. I have never used Sonora Pass, but I have been tempted. It
    : like Tioga is subject to Winter closure and could be very interesting
    : to try one day.

    The AAA road atlas indicates that a 19-mile stretch of that road is closed in
    winter, but right in the middle is a ski area! What are you supposed to do,
    snowshoe ten miles up to the lodge? ;^)

    BTW, I'll second the endorsement of Tioga Pass. Very scenic road, and I don't
    recall it as being all that tough a drive. At least I've seen much worse. My
    trip over it was more than 30 years ago, though, and it wouldn't surprise me
    if traffic is heavier now than it was then.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Apr 27, 2008
    #11
  12. Alan Browne

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On 2008-04-26 09:43:38 -0700, Alan Browne
    : <> said:
    :
    : >
    : > A good article with some phots:
    : > http://travel.nytimes.com/2008/04/27/travel/27journeys.html?hp
    : >
    : > I'll be in Yosemite for 4 days this summer, though mostly not where AA trekked.
    : >
    : > Cheers,
    : > Alan.
    :
    : If you are able to seperate yourself from the tourista masses, you will
    : find the AA vistas are there for everyman.
    : There are great vantage points of the valley, including El Cap,
    : Half-Dome, etc. which are just a step from the roadside (AA didn't do
    : all that much hiking.) ...

    There are some drawbacks to doing outdoor photography with a 10-inch view
    camera perched on a massive wooden tripod. ;^)

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Apr 27, 2008
    #12
  13. Alan Browne

    Alan Browne Guest

    Natural Bridges NP is nice:
    http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=6046198&size=lg but wish I had a
    WA lens. This place looked dull under overcast, but by the time we
    walked down to the bottom of the canyon, the overcast cleared.

    Arches NP is spectacular (and hot):
    http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=6046217&size=lg again a 40mm
    would have been great.
    http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=6046211&size=lg
    and of course the obligatory:
    http://www.pbase.com/shootin/image/71244103 hard hike at 102F and lots
    of gear.
    In plan.

    Cheers,
    Alan.
     
    Alan Browne, Apr 27, 2008
    #13
  14. Alan Browne

    Robert Coe Guest

    On 26 Apr 2008 19:13:06 GMT, (Ray Fischer) wrote:
    : You should note that the area around Tuolumne (that's four syllables,
    : BTW) meadows is at a wheeze-inducing 7,000 ft. ...

    Have they changed the authorized pronunciation? I could swear that when I was
    there in 1970, the park rangers, and even the recorded messages that played
    through your car radio, pronounced it TWAHL-um-nee (3 syllables).

    What's the 4-syllable version? too-uh-LUM-nee?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Apr 27, 2008
    #14
  15. Alan Browne

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On 2008-04-27 08:44:41 -0700, Robert Coe <> said:
    :
    : > On 26 Apr 2008 19:13:06 GMT, (Ray Fischer) wrote:
    : > : You should note that the area around Tuolumne (that's four syllables,
    : > : BTW) meadows is at a wheeze-inducing 7,000 ft. ...
    : >
    : > Have they changed the authorized pronunciation? I could swear that when I was
    : > there in 1970, the park rangers, and even the recorded messages that played
    : > through your car radio, pronounced it TWAHL-um-nee (3 syllables).
    : >
    : > What's the 4-syllable version? too-uh-LUM-nee?
    :
    : The psuedo-sophisticated wine country types tend toward "too-ul-um-nay" .
    : The same sort of the thing as turning the fine Dutch artist Van Gogh (
    : "Vun Gogg" with the gutteral GH, unachievable by the American tongue
    : without some Germanic language education) into an affected Frenchman
    : named Van Go!

    Or calling the Schuylkill River the "Skookle"? ;^)

    As for the word under discussion, it could be an example of a native American
    word being mangled by Spanish spelling conventions. I suppose that
    "too-uh-lum-nay" would be the approximate pronunciation in Spanish, but it
    doesn't look like a Spanish word to me. If the 3-syllable pronunciation were
    original, it might have been blurred by the transformation to Spanish
    orthography, which has (as best I recall) neither the "tw" sound cluster nor
    any obvious way to represent it.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Apr 27, 2008
    #15
  16. Alan Browne

    Robert Coe Guest

    : I have some neat shots of the tuffa on Mono Lake ...

    "tufa". Anyone Googling for what you're talking about will have to spell it
    correctly. "tuffa" generates an entirely different set of hits.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Apr 27, 2008
    #16
  17. Alan Browne

    er Guest

    ---------------------------------------------

    Thanks Bob,

    Do know how to spell it, but I have heavy fingers and a cheap keyboard that
    sometimes add a letter or two, here and there.

    EQR
     
    er, Apr 27, 2008
    #17
  18. [snip]
    I was in Tioga Pass in 1993 and there wasn't much traffic there. But,
    yes, the scenery was gorgeous!

    Here's a badly scanned and over-saturated photo that I took way back
    then and before I took up photography as a hobby:

    http://www.metalvortex.com/myphotos/usa/nearyosemite.htm

    --
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Website : www.MetalVortex.com
    Contact : www.MetalVortex.com/contact

    Blog : www.MetalVortex.com/blog
    Experimental : www.NinjaTrek.com

    Brain! Brain! What is brain?!
     
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu, Apr 28, 2008
    #18
  19. Alan Browne

    Don Kirkman Guest

    It seems to me I heard somewhere that Robert Coe wrote in article
    <>:

    [Re: pronunciation of "Tuolumne:\
    Your hunch about Tuolomne being native American seems right. A number of place
    or feature names in central California, some obscure, have the same ending;
    e.g.:

    Watchumne[sp?] - a small stream or canal (too small to be listed, but known to
    my father who grew up in the area
    Cosumne - a river in the gold country
    Mokelumne - a hill in the gold country
    Tuolumne - a plant (button celery)
     
    Don Kirkman, Apr 28, 2008
    #19
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