Any reports on the new Sigma MACRO 70mm F2.8 EX DG

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Eugene Wendland, Sep 12, 2006.

  1. I'm looking for Macro for my 350 Rebel/30D and see that Sigma has a new 70mm
    Macro F2.8 EX DG. Can anyone report on this lens? It's this or the Canon
    EFS 60mm F2.8. Any comments on the two would be appreciated.

    Thanks

    Eugene
     
    Eugene Wendland, Sep 12, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Eugene Wendland

    AaronW Guest

    Why not the Canon 50/2.5 macro or 100/2.8 macro?

    http://digitcamera.tripod.com/#slr
     
    AaronW, Sep 13, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Eugene Wendland

    Pete D Guest

    Pete D, Sep 13, 2006
    #3
  4. Eugene Wendland

    default Guest

    I have the Canon EF-S 60mm F/2.8 USM and it is a very nice lens. The front
    element neither rotates nor extends during focussing either and the focus
    ring doesn't turn during focusing either so there are no visible moving
    parts to scare away your subjects. This is a nice feature. The lens is
    also quite light (335g) and small and can be stopped down to F/32. As usual
    Canon does not supply the hood and it is a pricey extra although it is a
    good one. The focusing is a bit slow which is needed for macro distances,
    but there is not a switch for focus limiting although it can be switched to
    manual with focus confirmation. There is also full time manual focus in
    auto mode. It has a metal lens mount and seems to be fairly well built and
    it takes inexpensive 52mm filters.

    If you are considering the Sigma 70mm, then why not the Sigma 50 macro or
    the 105 macro? Both of those are less expensive than the 70 and they both
    reach 1:1 and both stop down 2 stops further (F/45) than the 70 (F/22) for
    more depth of field when that is more important than absolute sharpness.
    The 50 and 105 do extend during focusing although they don't rotate. I do
    not know about the 70mm and Sigma doesn't say on their website. Sigma also
    makes a 150 and 180 macro but these are much more expensive. Sigma does
    include a threaded hood and has a focus limiter. The 70mm is also 525 grams
    and is not a full frame image like the Sigma 50 and 105. The 70 also takes
    larger and more expensive 62mm filters than the 50 and 105 which take 55 and
    58mm filters respectively.

    Both the Sigma 50 and 105mm macro lenses are lighter, smaller, cheaper,
    cheaper for filters, produce a full size image circle, stop down further and
    are fairly well regarded. What is the possible draw to the 70mm lens over
    the previous offerings unless you really need that particular viewing angle?

    Personally, I would watch for a good deal somewhere or even used on a Canon
    100mm macro although I am very pleased with the 60mm and do not plan on
    replacing it.
     
    default, Sep 13, 2006
    #4
  5. Eugene Wendland

    default Guest

    I have the Canon EF-S 60mm F/2.8 USM and it is a very nice lens. The front
    element neither rotates nor extends during focusing either and the focus
    ring doesn't turn during focusing either so there are no visible moving
    parts to scare away your subjects. This is a nice feature. The lens is
    also quite light (335g) and small and can be stopped down to F/32. As usual
    Canon does not supply the hood and it is a pricey extra although it is a
    good one. The focusing is a bit slow which is needed for macro distances,
    but there is not a switch for focus limiting although it can be switched to
    manual with focus confirmation. There is also full time manual focus in
    auto mode. It has a metal lens mount and seems to be fairly well built and
    it takes inexpensive 52mm filters.

    If you are considering the Sigma 70mm, then why not the Sigma 50 macro or
    the 105 macro? Both of those are less expensive than the 70 and they both
    reach 1:1 and both stop down 2 stops further (F/45) than the 70 (F/22) for
    more depth of field when that is more important than absolute sharpness.
    The 50 and 105 do extend during focusing although they don't rotate. I do
    not know about the 70mm and Sigma doesn't say on their website. Sigma also
    makes a 150 and 180 macro but these are much more expensive. Sigma does
    include a threaded hood and has a focus limiter. The 70mm is also 525 grams
    which is quite a bit for a small lens. The 70mm lens also takes larger and
    more expensive 62mm filters than the 50 and 105 which take 55 and 58mm
    filters respectively.

    Both the Sigma 50 and 105mm macro lenses are lighter, smaller, cheaper,
    cheaper for filters, stop down further and are fairly well regarded. What
    is the possible draw to the 70mm lens over the previous offerings unless you
    really need that particular viewing angle?

    I had said in a previous post that the 70mm lens is not full frame, this is
    wrong, the 70 is full frame, but I am do not know what makes it better than
    the 50 or 105 to justify being more expensive than either of them.

    Personally, I would watch for a good deal somewhere or even used on a Canon
    100mm macro although I am very pleased with the 60mm and do not plan on
    replacing it.
     
    default, Sep 13, 2006
    #5
  6. Eugene Wendland

    default Guest

    Comparing Sigma's MTF charts for the 50, 70, and 105mm macros, it appears
    that the new 70mm is a little bit better than the other two which may
    justify the increased cost although they all look pretty good. If it had
    other modern features like no external moving parts, then even more so, but
    I cannot find a review to say if that is the case or not.
     
    default, Sep 13, 2006
    #6
  7. Thanks for all the information.

    One of the reasons I was looking at the 60-70 mm Macro lenses was the fact
    that I could also use it as a portrait lens, so with a multiplication factor
    of about 1.5, I'd be in the 90 - 105 range. I looked at the Sigma 50mm and
    really liked the price, but for reasons about, I was thinking about the 60
    or 70mm.

    I'll probably go with the Canon (I already have 3 other EFS lenses). I like
    everything about the lens. The Sigma option appealed to be because my
    daughter has a film Elan 7 Canon and she'd be able to use the Sigma Macro on
    the Elan. In reality though, if she really wanted to shoot some Macro -
    she'd probably end up taking one of my cameras and then tell me about it
    after. LOL

    Thanks again for all the input.

    Eugene
     
    Eugene Wendland, Sep 13, 2006
    #7
  8. Eugene Wendland

    Harry Krause Guest


    Because the 70 becomes a 105 on most digital cameras, and many consider
    105 the perfect head and shoulders portrait lens.
     
    Harry Krause, Sep 13, 2006
    #8
  9. Eugene Wendland

    AaronW Guest

    On full frame, I think 85mm is good for "normal" portrait, 135mm for
    tight portrait, and 50mm for environmental portrait. Most manufacturers
    (except Canon) don't have a portrait lens around 100mm (only macro
    around 100mm), but they all have portrait lenses at 85mm and 135mm.

    http://digitcamera.tripod.com/#slr
     
    AaronW, Sep 14, 2006
    #9
  10. Eugene Wendland

    default Guest

    I've used my EF-S 60mm f/2.8 macro on my Canon Elan IIe camera. It works
    fine mounted on a Canon EF25 II extension tube and with the extension tube
    has a large enough image circle to cover the 35mm frame. This of course
    loses infinity focus and allows even closer focussing. Magnification varies
    from 1.61 to 0.44 with a 25mm tube across the focusing range according to
    Canon. Even set to infinity you are very close to the subject. Autofocus
    and the aperture and everything work fine.

    I don't have an EF12 II tube to test with so although it would mount, I
    don't know if the image circle is big enough to cover full frame at only
    12mm extension. With a 12mm tube, the magnification would be 1.28 to 0.20
    which would give more of a working range with a film camera. By just
    holding the lens in front of the camera, I see corner darkening at about 4mm
    that is as close as I can get. At 12mm it seems to be not visible in the
    viewfinder.

    So you could use the EF-S 60mm for macro photography on her Elan 7, just not
    normal photography. Only the II versions of the Canon extension tubes fit
    both EF-S and EF lenses however.
     
    default, Sep 14, 2006
    #10
  11. Eugene Wendland

    Harry Krause Guest


    Those of us with Nikon F's in our background are fully aware of the
    delights of the 105 Nikkor...
     
    Harry Krause, Sep 14, 2006
    #11
  12. I had a chance to do an in-store comparison between the Sigma 70mm Macro and
    the Canon EF-S 60mm. The Sigma was bigger and a bit heavier which gave it a
    real solid feel. The front lens also moves during focusing (quite a bit,
    actually) and I can see where this may be a bit of a distraction while
    shooting portraits. I tried the AF on various items and found that the
    Canon did a lot more searching than the Sigma. I felt that the Sigma lens
    would focus quicker than the Canon. Sigma also comes with a lens hood and
    carrying case.

    Eugene
     
    Eugene Wendland, Sep 19, 2006
    #12
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.