Any Tips on taking pictures of bronze statues in bright sunshine?

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by jbert, Jul 8, 2005.

  1. jbert

    jbert Guest

    Any Tips on taking pictures of dark bronze statues in bright sunshine?
    Mine are either dark or if spot metered on the statue, the fore and back
    ground is washed out. Shoot mostly in 'A' or sometimes 'P'. Thanks. JAB
     
    jbert, Jul 8, 2005
    #1
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  2. jbert

    Ted Guest

    fill flash perhaps...........manually adjust it until desired expo is
    reached.......experiment
     
    Ted, Jul 8, 2005
    #2
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  3. jbert

    Pete D Guest

    I would think that underexposing a stop or so will stop you blowing any
    higlights, then adjust in post. You could always wait till it is clouded
    over a little. What camera are we talking here?
     
    Pete D, Jul 8, 2005
    #3
  4. jbert

    Mark² Guest

    This is where in incident meter is helpful, because it will meter for the
    scene, rather than the subject.
    You can also use a grey card, but a good substitute for a grey card is
    healthy, green grass. It's very close to a good middle tone. So...meter on
    some grass that's in the same light...compose the shot, focus and bing.

    You'd do well to not shoot under high, bright sun. Shoot them in early
    morning or late afternoon with low-angled sunlight. Not only will this give
    you far better balance between the statue's illumination and it's
    surroundings, but it will give the statue more depth because of dramatic
    shadow angles...and...the shadows won't be so harsh.
     
    Mark², Jul 8, 2005
    #4
  5. In other words, be aware of the statue's limitation on illumination....

    Another way is to shoot RAW, then set one conversion to, say + 1.5 stops
    and the other to -1.5 stops. Then using a mask on one, after importing
    and lining them up in one windwo, to paint in the statue or the
    background, whichever you prefer.
     
    John McWilliams, Jul 8, 2005
    #5
  6. jbert

    Paul Heslop Guest

    I use PSP and I think curves does a good job of bringing up parts of
    an image too, you can lighten or darken this way. I took this picture
    some time ago, no idea what I was doing (not much different now!) but
    you could see hardly anything on the figure, a black sillhuoette
    against the sky. Then someone told me about curves and I was able to
    bring up the detail without ruining the sky behind

    http://groups.msn.com/OtherSides/statuary.msnw?action=ShowPhoto&PhotoID=683
     
    Paul Heslop, Jul 9, 2005
    #6
  7. jbert

    jbert Guest

    Thanks for all the responses. I will try to put some of them to use.
    Unfortunately, these statues pictures will be taken on vacation when I
    can't control the timing, weather or my wife who gets a bit impatient
    after a while. And after taking 1000 images, I don't have much time or
    desire to post process them. Just looking for a way to get a descent
    snap shot.
    JAB
     
    jbert, Jul 11, 2005
    #7
  8. jbert

    Roe Thomas Guest

    Hello JAB; I will recommend that you become comfortable with using a
    flash for fill, you will I'm sure find this enhances many of your
    photos. Just ignore the nit-wits that recomend you wait for the time of
    day or the season when the light may be "right". Roe
     
    Roe Thomas, Jul 14, 2005
    #8
  9. : In article <>,

    : > I will recommend that you become comfortable with using a
    : > flash for fill, you will I'm sure find this enhances many of your
    : > photos. Just ignore the nit-wits that recomend you wait for the time of
    : > day or the season when the light may be "right". Roe

    : Granted a fill flash can do a lot, but you're really pushing it to try
    : it on a shiny metal statue at a distance in the sunlight.

    Maybe we can agree that different situations, different ambient
    lighting, and different available equipment may require different
    solutions. It is obvious that there is no one way to get "good" photos of
    statuary. In some situations, and some subjects, a fill flash may help. In
    others just positioning the camera to allow a mid contrast background may
    bring out the desired details. And in other situations, nothing short of a
    full Hollywood lighting crew will give acceptable results. :)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Jul 15, 2005
    #9
  10. : I once wanted to test a new telephoto lens so I chose the intricate
    : concrete castings around a government building as the subject. Far away,
    : lots of detail and no movement to contend with.

    : I was disappointed that it was a dreary, cloudy day but did the shoot
    : anyhow. Boy was I pleased with the results- little did I know but I
    : could not have asked for better lighting!

    I agree. For many subjects a cloudy day gives spectacular results. A good
    soft light makes many subjects much easier to capture. And durring the
    "hot months" a cloudy day is much more comfortable (to me). :)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Jul 15, 2005
    #10
  11. jbert

    Mark² Guest

    Overcast days are great for when you want to avoid harsh shadows.
    Great for people pictures, too, so long as you've got a filter or white
    balance setting.

    I remember on my wedding day...saying to the photographer something like,
    "Sorry we don't have any sun..."
    His response was, "No way! This is the absoute BEST day for shooting
    outside weddings! -No face shadows...no people squinting...etc."
     
    Mark², Jul 15, 2005
    #11
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