Aperture locked on Nikon AF ED 70-300mm Zoom lens - broken?

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by Kirk Bowe, Sep 12, 2003.

  1. Kirk Bowe

    Kirk Bowe Guest

    Hi, I have a strange problem with the above lens. Been using it with
    no problems attached to an old Nikon FE2. However after a couple of
    days of not using the lens it now appears to be "locked" at the
    smallest aperture setting, and will not budge from it. Rotating the
    aperture dial does not alter the aperture at all whether attached to
    the camera or not.

    If anyone could explain this I would be very grateful, as it is a
    great lens and I'm hoping that there is some setting I can change and
    that it is not broken!

    Many thanks
     
    Kirk Bowe, Sep 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. Kirk> Hi, I have a strange problem with the above lens. Been using it
    Kirk> with no problems attached to an old Nikon FE2. However after a
    Kirk> couple of days of not using the lens it now appears to be
    Kirk> "locked" at the smallest aperture setting, and will not budge
    Kirk> from it. Rotating the aperture dial does not alter the aperture
    Kirk> at all whether attached to the camera or not.

    It is not clear exactly what you mean. Do you mean that even when the
    lens is attached to the camera, the diaphragm is stopped down all the
    way? If so, try moving the small rectangular pin that protrudes from
    the slot next to the back of the lens. If that pin causes the
    diaphragm to open, your camera is broken. If not, your lens is
    broken.

    Or do you mean that you cannot move the aperture ring, which is now
    stuck on the smallest aperture? If so, I hope I don't embarrass you
    by asking whether you are sure that the aperture lock hasn't become
    inadvertently set? That's the tiny slider that is embedded in the
    aperture ring itself. If set in one position, it should physically
    prevent the aperture ring from being moved off its minimum aperture.

    If you can describe the symptom more completely, perhaps we can
    give further advice.
     
    Andrew Koenig, Sep 12, 2003
    #2
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  3. This lens has a switch that locks it in the smallest aperature position.
    When using the lens on a newer style camera, the switch should be locked in,
    so that you can't adjust the aperature by hand. The newer cameras will be
    able to adjust the aperature from the camera body. If you don't have such a
    camera, then you have to take the switch to the non-lock position in order
    to adjust the aperature by hand using the aperature ring on the lens.
     
    William Graham, Sep 13, 2003
    #3
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