Approaches to macro with the 300D

Discussion in 'Australia Photography' started by aaardvaark, Dec 13, 2003.

  1. aaardvaark

    aaardvaark Guest

    One of my goals in getting the 300D was to get to do some macro work. I
    have rambled a bit on this list about the close up ability of the kit
    lens and my sigma 70-300. Each of these is impressive up to a point,
    but to get down to real close ups i.e closer to 1:1 requires something
    more. I want to get life-size insects on my sensor.

    The choices are:
    - extension rings,
    - a screw-on close up converter lens for the front of one of my
    existing lenses,
    - or a proper macro lens.

    Given that I will have those two zooms and the Canon 50/f1.8, what
    suggestions do people have about an approach? Oh yes, I am also not
    flush with funds at this point so "buy a Canon f1.4 something L macro
    lens" is not an option.

    Obviously(?) a proper macro lens would be the best, so are there any
    good but economical lenses around? Why are there so many different
    focal lengths for macros? ISTM that you would like a long-ish length
    so that you are a bit removed from the subject for flash reasons and
    for ease of access. But I can't see the reason for short length
    macros. Cheaper?

    What is the quality difference between the three approaches? Are
    extension tubes better than addon close up lenses? If so why do people
    use add on lenses? If not, why do people use ext tubes?

    What are the pros and cons of using the ext tubes or add-on converter
    lens on my long zoom as opposed the short one or the 50mm?

    (The kit lens has a native macro repro ratio about .38, and the sigma
    is 0.5 at 300mm, .35 at 200mm)

    Questions questions....I know I could read a book on this but would
    appreciate a quick start from experienced macro-ers based on your own
    experience.

    I notice that digital cameras with smaller than 35mm sensors get a
    magbification advantage in macro as well, assuming you believe that the
    image can be blown up to the same size prints as from a 35mm neg. This
    1.6x business is handy sometimes.

    Thanks for any insights.
     
    aaardvaark, Dec 13, 2003
    #1
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  2. aaardvaark

    [BnH] Guest

    Are you doing the macro for professional work ?

    if not, why don't you buy a prosumer digital that have good macro capability
    ?
    Nikon CP5700 ? Fuji S602z ? and many more ..
    or a Canon G5 with reversed 50mm lens can also do good macro work .
    I can fwd you some sample if you are interested.

    =bob=

    news:...
     
    [BnH], Dec 13, 2003
    #2
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  3. aaardvaark

    OzPhoto Guest

    Tamrom have a nice lens at $599

    Tamron 28-200mm f3.8-5.6 Super Zoom XR Macro

    I plan to buy one for my 300D

    Robert
     
    OzPhoto, Dec 13, 2003
    #3
  4. aaardvaark

    Phil Cole Guest



    A longer focal length will allow you to be further away from the subject -
    handy if you like taking photos of bitey things like spiders, or just don't
    want a sore back. The downside to this is that the longer the focal length,
    the less depth of field. Considering the focal length conversion, a 50ish mm
    lens would probably give you a nice balance.




    Close up lenses are basically magnifying glasses that you stick on the front
    of your lens - usually not any where near as good quality as your lens, so
    you lose quality. Extension tubes on the other hand, simply move the lense
    away, so that the front of the lens is closer to the object, giving higher
    magnification (that isn't the scientific explanation - you'll have to go to
    someone else for that) there shouldn't be much optical degradation with
    extension tubes, as there's not glass in them.



    As far as why people use each of them - I think close up lenses are mainly
    used on non-interchangeable lens camera's, where extension tubes can't be
    used.



    I don't have canon gear, but I'm pretty sure you can get some non-canon
    extension tubes quite cheaply (and since there's no glass in them, they
    won't affect picture quality in the slightest!)



    Hope that helps,



    Phil
     
    Phil Cole, Dec 13, 2003
    #4
  5. "Phil Cole" <>, far, far away from here,
    appears to have written:

    [snips]
    Kenko make very good ones that are very well regarded.

    http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/43780
     
    M i c C u l l e n, Dec 13, 2003
    #5
  6. aaardvaark

    Gavin Cato Guest

    Get the Sigma 180mm f3.5 macro lens.


    news:...
     
    Gavin Cato, Dec 13, 2003
    #6
  7. aaardvaark

    aaardvaark Guest

    Not professional, but the small sensor cameras dont do it for me in
    terms of image quality (lens sharpness and noise levels at >=
    5MPixels), also I like lower depth of field in many shots and you
    can't get it with these cameras (which is why you are suggesting them,
    this is an advantage in many macro shots).

    Cheers
     
    aaardvaark, Dec 14, 2003
    #7
  8. aaardvaark

    aaardvaark Guest

    Why? This is interesting but not really helpful to me.

    Actually it was useful because I discovered the minimum message reply
    length on this forum is 10 characters and my initial response was only
    4...
     
    aaardvaark, Dec 14, 2003
    #8
  9. aaardvaark

    aaardvaark Guest

    <<<Almonds are members of the peach family.>>>

    I know, I used to have a peach tree that only produced lousy shrivelled
    peaches with more seed than fruit. Until I discovered it was an almond
    tree.

    Thanks Mic for the Kenko tip. What I am still wondering is why anyone
    would buy an expensive macro lens if they already own a good non-macro
    lens and they could get good quality shots with extension tubes?

    I used to have ext tubes on the nicked Nikon, but I was not thinking
    very hard about quality or magnification so have no experience of my
    own to compare ext tube results with dedicated macro lens (and zoom
    macros for that matter).

    Cheers

    Julian
     
    aaardvaark, Dec 14, 2003
    #9
  10. aaardvaark

    aaardvaark Guest

    <<<Phil said...

    A longer focal length will allow you to be further away from the
    subject -
    handy if you like taking photos of bitey things like spiders, or just
    don't
    want a sore back. The downside to this is that the longer the focal
    length,
    the less depth of field. Considering the focal length conversion, a
    50ish mm
    lens would probably give you a nice balance.>>>

    Thanks Phil this is what I was looking for. Long lenses also (I am
    learning) give you a lot more camera shake if you you don't have mirror
    lockup like the 300D doesn't (which reeeeally annoys me)). But a 50mm
    would have to be pretty close to subject - well actually I know it does
    because that is around what I used on my macro experiments with the
    300D kit lens.


    <<<As far as why people use each of them - I think close up lenses are
    mainly used on non-interchangeable lens camera's, where extension tubes
    can't be used.>>>

    Ah yes, I didn't think of that.

    Cheers
     
    aaardvaark, Dec 14, 2003
    #10
  11. aaardvaark

    aaardvaark Guest

    Hi Robert -

    Unless I am mistaken, you should not buy the Tamron for its macro or
    wider angle use - the kit lens does both better.

    Kit lens has a macro ratio around .38x while the Tamron is only .25x

    My Sigma also has a macro of 0.5x so I'd be gaining nothing with the
    Tamron.

    And just an opinion to add to your purchase decision making, I'd be
    surprised it the tamron was as sharp as the kit lens, but I could be
    wrong. That kit lens is not too shabby for what it is. I suppose you
    know that with the 1.6x factor, the 28mm lens is scarcely wide angle on
    the 300D.

    Cheers

    Julian
     
    aaardvaark, Dec 14, 2003
    #11
  12. aaardvaark <>, far, far away
    from here, appears to have written:

    [snips]
    Because, according to all reports, it's a *really* good lens. a REALLY
    good lens.
    Firstly, this is a newsgroup, not a forum, and secondly, the minimum
    length reply is set by your newsserver, not the newsgroup itself. In the
    old days, almost all newsservers had a 'quoted/new material' ratio that
    had to be exceeded, but it wouldn't make much difference anymore,
    because most people just top-post with no editing anyway.
    --

    cheers, Mic (Reply address works...)

    "A lie told often enough becomes the truth."
    -- Lenin
     
    M i c C u l l e n, Dec 14, 2003
    #12
  13. aaardvaark

    aaardvaark Guest

    Mic wrote:
    <<<<Firstly, this is a newsgroup, not a forum, and secondly, the
    minimum
    length reply is set by your newsserver, not the newsgroup itself. In
    the
    old days, almost all newsservers had a 'quoted/new material' ratio
    that
    had to be exceeded, but it wouldn't make much difference anymore,
    because most people just top-post with no editing anyway.>>>>


    Well that's funny because I am not using a newsreader or accessing
    through a newsserver. I'm accessing this as a web page. And I thought
    the page address gave it away...

    http://forums.eyo.com.au/showthread.php?t=32715

    ... and then this is written on the reply screen as I write...
    "See Forum Rules (below) for
    more information about what
    codes you are allowed to use
    in your posts.
    "

    Sounds like a forum to me.

    So in my case the message length is limited by some website software.

    Since this is accessable as a news group, can you tell me what its name
    is please?

    Cheers,

    Julian
     
    aaardvaark, Dec 14, 2003
    #13
  14. aaardvaark

    Ken Chandler Guest

    [snipped to context]
    aus.photo
     
    Ken Chandler, Dec 14, 2003
    #14
  15. aaardvaark

    Phil Guest

    aus.photo - in case no one's replied to you yet.

    Cheers,
    Phil
     
    Phil, Dec 14, 2003
    #15
  16. aaardvaark

    hippy Guest

    Does the 10D or D100 have MLU?

    hippy
     
    hippy, Dec 16, 2003
    #16
  17. "hippy" <>, far, far away from here,
    appears to have written:

    [snips]
    10D does; don't know about the D100.
    --

    cheers, Mic (Reply address works...)

    "The important thing is not to stop questioning."
    -- Albert Einstein
     
    M i c C u l l e n, Dec 16, 2003
    #17
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