auto exposure for stage lighting?

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by james, Jun 21, 2009.

  1. james

    james Guest

    Are there camcorders with spot metering with user-definable spot size?

    I'd like to set up a manless camcorder to shoot b-roll for stage productions
    (e.g. ballet). My current camcorder uses average metering, so when I zoom
    out wide, some dark area outside the stage is inevitably included which
    confuses the average metering system and cause the stage to become
    overexposed. If I can specify the area to meter (the stage), that would be
    great.

    Spot metering, if availble, probably won't work very well if the spot is
    small, because performers wearing different shades of costume crossing the
    "spot" would cause the exposure to go brigher or darker, so it really has to
    average the entire stage or at least a large area of the stage.

    Stage lighting changes so I can't just put it on manual exposure.
     
    james, Jun 21, 2009
    #1
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  2. james

    Larry in AZ Guest

    Yes, you can, and that's how you should do it. You don't want the iris
    hunting around in any sort of auto-iris modes.
     
    Larry in AZ, Jun 21, 2009
    #2
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  3. james

    Steve King Guest

    | Waiving the right to remain silent, "james" <> said:
    |
    | > Are there camcorders with spot metering with user-definable spot size?
    |
    | > Stage lighting changes so I can't just put it on manual exposure.
    |
    | Yes, you can, and that's how you should do it. You don't want the iris
    | hunting around in any sort of auto-iris modes.

    Manual iris is the best way to go IMO, too.

    Steve King
     
    Steve King, Jun 21, 2009
    #3
  4. james

    Mike Kujbida Guest


    As both Steve & Larry said, go with manual exposure.
    I've shot several stage performances over the past several years and my
    procedure is ALWAYS the same.
    Set the exposure for the brightest scene (attending a rehearsal helps a
    lot here) and then leave it at that level.
    After all, if the light level drops for the performers, there's no
    reason why it shouldn't drop for the viewing audience as well.

    Mike
     
    Mike Kujbida, Jun 21, 2009
    #4
  5. This says it all :) If it concerns you that material might be too
    dark, you can overexpose by one stop or so, so you will have better
    exposed material on your B-cam, and hope that you won't need to cut
    back to that B-cam for the "bright" scenes. Although, that would not
    be such a drama, as it's easier to pull back the highlights (if not
    too dramtically overexposed), than pulling up the blacks to drag some
    faint image out of the darkness (grain!).
    Just another thought :)

    cheers

    -martin-
     
    Martin Heffels, Jun 22, 2009
    #5
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