B&W development: first try.

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Jim Hutchison, May 5, 2004.

  1. Jim Hutchison

    Bob Hickey Guest

    Bob Hickey, May 7, 2004
    #21
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  2. Jim Hutchison

    Matt Clara Guest


    Hmmm... Not sure if I follow you here: the grain is VERY present in 3200
    speed film (almost always, the higher the ISO, the grainier the film), and
    2820 DPI reveals A LOT of detail (enough for a 13 x 19 print, and more, if
    you don't mind interpolating). So, at the risk of seeming obnoxious, one
    could conclude that a high resolution scan of grainy film would reveal a lot
    of grain.
     
    Matt Clara, May 7, 2004
    #22
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  3. Jim Hutchison

    Matt Clara Guest

    Check Ebay for Beseler 23 and 23C's. Once you've got the enlarger with a
    lens and lamp, all you need are some trays, a red light, some paper &
    chemicals, and a dark room to work in--it doesn't even need running water,
    though that is convenient.

    You could probably do it for under $200.
     
    Matt Clara, May 8, 2004
    #23
  4. Appreciate the comment...

    jim h


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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    Even a bit of humour...
     
    Jim Hutchison, May 8, 2004
    #24
  5. Jim Hutchison

    ericm1600 Guest

    Probably. If you scan at a low enough resolution, the grain may be smoothed
    out. Then again, if you scan at a high enough resolution, when the image is
    down-sampled for printing, some of the grain may also be smoothed out.

    I scan at 4000 dpi. Viewing at 100% is good for determining if the image is
    critically sharp, but doesn't really say much about how the final print will
    look.

    I use Neopan 1600 developed in Xtol 1:3 for my high speed combination. I'm
    happy with the grain that I get:

    http://canid.com/pets/faustus.html
     
    ericm1600, May 8, 2004
    #25
  6. Should I expect REALLY grainy results from

    Use a slower film. Plus X or Tri- X (which can still be grainy).

    And go into the darkroom and LEARN the old fashion way first.
     
    Robert John Guttke, May 9, 2004
    #26
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