Background for Macro photography

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Chris Curtis, May 16, 2009.

  1. Chris Curtis

    Chris Curtis Guest

    I'm looking for a place that sells nice seamless backgrounds that I can use
    for a few macro photos I need to shoot.
    I've been told I should use velvet as a background.
    Is that the way to go?

    I'm looking for black, red and white backgrounds for macro.

    Thanks for your help

    CC
     
    Chris Curtis, May 16, 2009
    #1
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  2. Chris Curtis

    Charles Guest


    It should be out of focus, so what it is shouldn't matter. Try a
    fabric store.
     
    Charles, May 16, 2009
    #2
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  3. Chris Curtis

    J. Clarke Guest

    If you're looking for cheap, Walmart has some fleece blankets for about 5
    bucks in a variety of colors that work fine. For macro though a package of
    poster board from Staples will give you a variety of colors in sizes large
    enough for macro.
     
    J. Clarke, May 16, 2009
    #3
  4. Chris Curtis

    Randy Guest


    Thank you for your suggestions.

    My problem with foam core boards, towels etc. is how it shows up under the
    item I'm shooting.
    Not so much the background but actually where the item is sitting/standing
    on the material.
    Meaning that if I lay something on a black foam core board it won't look
    pitch black under the item.
    I suppose I'll just have to go through the image and do some burning in PS.

    Thanks
     
    Randy, May 16, 2009
    #4
  5. Chris Curtis

    Randy Guest

    Just wanted to tell you that I'm on a different computer as I post this and
    the above reply.
    After posting my original post I drove to my friend's house and checked this
    news group there.
    Hope there is no confusion.

    I'm still Cris
     
    Randy, May 16, 2009
    #5
  6. Chris Curtis

    Paul Furman Guest

    Then you need a soft box; foreground lighting that reduces shadows by
    spreading the light from all directions but the hole you poke the lens
    through.


    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, May 16, 2009
    #6
  7. While I used black velvet for the "Durian Gray" shot, the problem with
    any napped fabric is that it gathers dust. That dust can be quite
    apparent in a macro shot.

    I agree that a trip to the fabric store is probably in order, but
    something as simple as a piece of cardstock can also work quite well.
     
    Mike Benveniste, May 16, 2009
    #7
  8. Chris Curtis

    Bob Guest

    -:I'm looking for a place that sells nice seamless backgrounds that I can use
    -:for a few macro photos I need to shoot.
    -:I've been told I should use velvet as a background.
    -:Is that the way to go?
    -:
    -:I'm looking for black, red and white backgrounds for macro.

    what did google suggest?
    at calumet, for example.
    what did any photo store have?


    -:
    -:Thanks for your help
    -:
    -:CC
    -:
    -:
    -:
     
    Bob, May 16, 2009
    #8
  9. Chris Curtis

    Chris Curtis Guest


    Could you please tell me if I should be using the camera's flash system, I'm
    using Nikon, or if I should have a continuous light with soft boxes etc.
    I don't do macros and am just starting to play with it.
    It seems to me the advantage of having continuous light would be that I can
    see the way things look before I start shooting. Calling for less
    experiment.
    Using the flash system and remote flashes seems to call for much more
    experiments.

    Wrong?

    Thanks

    CC
     
    Chris Curtis, May 16, 2009
    #9
  10. Chris Curtis

    Paul Furman Guest

    I'm adverse to flash so a biased opinion but for this kind of thing, use
    a tripod and you don't need to add any light.


    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, May 16, 2009
    #10
  11. Chris Curtis

    J. Clarke Guest

    You do whatever you need to do to get the shot you want. The on-camera
    flash doesn't generally work out too well for macro work because its
    location is usually such that the lens casts a shadow on the subject.
     
    J. Clarke, May 16, 2009
    #11
  12. Chris Curtis

    Eric Stevens Guest

    I too use a matte finished paper, typically cartridge paper as used
    for drawing and painting. I usually use bounce flash aimed backwards
    over my shoulder so as to reflect off the ceiling and the wall behind
    me.



    Eric Stevens
     
    Eric Stevens, May 17, 2009
    #12
  13. Chris Curtis

    DMac Guest

    Have a look at ring type LED lights. The 64 LED versions are nearly up
    to the output of an entry level ring flash at much lower cost. eBay is
    full of them.
     
    DMac, May 17, 2009
    #13
  14. Chris Curtis

    Paul Furman Guest

    Paul Furman, May 17, 2009
    #14
  15. Chris Curtis

    Bob Larter Guest

    A quick run over the fabric with a handheld vaccum cleaner should fix that.
     
    Bob Larter, May 30, 2009
    #15
  16. Chris Curtis

    Bob Larter Guest

    Bob Larter, May 30, 2009
    #16
  17. Chris Curtis

    Bob Larter Guest

    True, but not as bad as fluorescent tubes, for example.
     
    Bob Larter, May 30, 2009
    #17
  18. If you use black velvet, or even a black fleece, unless your subject
    has significant black detail (such as a black camera) it should be
    easy enough just to raise the black threshold in translating the image
    from RAW so that the material comes out totally black. You might even
    be able to do it in the ex-camera jpeg just by choosing your exposure
    with an eye on the histogram.
     
    Chris Malcolm, Mar 23, 2010
    #18
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