Backpacker considering Nikon N75 camera for small size

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by DL, Nov 12, 2004.

  1. DL

    DL Guest

    I backpack pretty frequently and want to purchase a lighter Nikon SLR body
    to go with several lenses just for these camping trips. My primary usage of
    the camera will be for landscapes, infrequent wildlife that I just stumble
    upon, and occasional night-time, star trail shots. I recognize that it's
    not the most feature-laden camera but are there any features that any of
    you think makes the camera unsuitable for this situation? The only thing
    that jumped out at me was that the shutter speed maxes out at 1/2000 but
    I'm using slow film and slow zooms so that won't be a problem, and the
    flash appears to only pop up during auto modes.

    Thanks.
     
    DL, Nov 12, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. When it comes to size and features, nothing beats the Minolta Maxxum 5.
    Over the N75, the Maxxum 5 features 7-AF points, 1/4000sec shutter
    speed, 3fps and *more* manual control.

    Ofcourse, Nikon gives you more lens choice but Minolta too has an
    adequate lens cover.

    Hope this helps,

    Siddhartha
     
    Siddhartha Jain, Nov 12, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. DL

    columbotrek Guest

    Really want to know what I would take to the back country? FM2n or
    FM3a. Yep, manual camera bodies. FM3a has a handy auto exposure mode
    and TTL flash support. If you use the self timer you get a pseudo mirror
    lockup which is helpful for slow shutter speeds. Shooting star trails
    will burn the batteries down on the N75 but the manual body can be
    locked open for as long as you wish. Be sure to bring a locking cable
    release. You will not need auto focus for landscapes and there will be
    no whir from the film advance or lens focusing motors to scare the
    bunnies away. Oh, try to find room for a fast 50mm lens in your kit.
     
    columbotrek, Nov 12, 2004
    #3
  4. These are much heavier than the F75, though.

    Galen Rowell's "Simple Does It, Too" article might
    be interesting for the OP:
    http://www.mountainlight.com/articles/op2001.01.html

    Regards,
    Chris
     
    Christoph Breitkopf, Nov 12, 2004
    #4
  5. DL

    Alan Browne Guest

    If you shoot negtives (print film) it should be fine. If you shoot slide film
    it is a bit limited in control. Look into the Maxxum 5 is my advice (unless
    your hands are big).

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Nov 12, 2004
    #5
  6. DL

    DL Guest

    Galen's philosophy is exactly what I am trying to follow. I've read several
    of his articles about light hiking, as well as Charles Campbell's The
    Backpacker's Photography Handbook, and am trying to emulate their hiking
    techniques with light lenses and bodies. I know that the N75 isn't going to
    be my day-to-day camera but at 13 ounces and only $150 after rebate, it
    seems like a great way to cut my camera weight in half.
     
    DL, Nov 12, 2004
    #6
  7. DL

    columbotrek Guest

    The URL makes perfect sense. Except for the top poster's stated need to
    shoot star trails which implies long exposure times, I fully agree. An
    N80 fits the bill very well. N75 almost as well. Just know that for
    the long exposures, those electronic bodies drain the batteries. If I am
    remembering right, a fresh set of CR123 in an N80 will hold the shutter
    open for about 6 hours. This is why I use a mechanical shutter camera
    for that kind of work. It is why I suggested a FM3a or a FM2n over a
    N75 or some other electronic body. AF is not needed for Landscapes and
    star Trails and I find the noise of the various motors alarms the
    wildlife. The shutter is bad enough at times. I have more than one body
    because type has some advantages. Each photographer needs to assess
    their needs and make their best choice.
     
    columbotrek, Nov 13, 2004
    #7
  8. DL

    Bandicoot Guest

    Just the article I was going to point to...

    Yes the N75 has limitations, at that weight of course it does, but if the
    weight matters more than those limitations, it's a good tool for the job
    (and for the money). I have a Pentax MZ-3 as well as my much heavier bodies
    for just the same sorts of reasons.


    Peter
     
    Bandicoot, Nov 13, 2004
    #8
  9. DL

    DL Guest

    There are two other relevant articles at Galen Rowell's website:

    http://mountainlight.com/articles/op1998.09.html

    http://mountainlight.com/articles/op2001.12.html
     
    DL, Nov 13, 2004
    #9
  10. DL

    Sander Vesik Guest

    Sander Vesik, Nov 14, 2004
    #10
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.