Batch convert RAW images to jpeg?

Discussion in 'Photoshop' started by Allan M. Bruce, May 30, 2006.

  1. I borrowed a friends camera as I am thinking about upgrading and I have
    managed to fill up his 1GB card with RAW images (about 120). Anyway, I want
    to batch convert all of these images to jpeg and the ones which need
    touching up I can do manually.
    I have Photoshop CS2 - can it be done using this? or can someone tell me a
    utility which can?
    Thanks
    Allan
     
    Allan M. Bruce, May 30, 2006
    #1
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  2. Allan M. Bruce

    Rudy Benner Guest

    You can do that from Adobe Bridge, but not 120 at a time.

    You would do better to copy all the raw files to CDs and work from there.
    Make 2 sets of CDs, one for you and one for the owner of the camera.

    Your order of operations is not optimal. You need to do your editing before
    saving to jpegs.
     
    Rudy Benner, May 30, 2006
    #2
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  3. You can do that from Adobe Bridge, but not 120 at a time.
    Can I do more than one at once?
    Why? The owner of the camera does not want the pictures I have taken.
    I meant: I will batch convert all of them, then if there are any pictures
    which need altering I will work from the original RAW data again.

    Allan
     
    Allan M. Bruce, May 30, 2006
    #3
  4. Of course you can do all 120 in batch. No reason why you couldn't. The
    easiest way is to use 'File - Scripts - Image Processor'
     
    Johan W. Elzenga, May 30, 2006
    #4
  5. Allan M. Bruce

    Guest Guest

    Guest, May 30, 2006
    #5
  6. Johan W. Elzenga wrote:
    [snip]
    Or from Bridge: Tools > Photoshop > Image Processor
    This is just another way of calling the same script, but selecting the
    files in Bridge first.
     
    Barry Pearson, May 30, 2006
    #6
  7. Allan M. Bruce

    tacit Guest

    Of course you can do all 120 in batch. No reason why you couldn't. The
    easiest way is to use 'File - Scripts - Image Processor'[/QUOTE]

    The downside of doing this is that you lose the benefit of shooting in
    RAW to begin with.

    There is an advantage to shooting RAW images rather than JPEG
    images--the RAW image is not compressed and preserves information about
    the exposure settings, allowing you to make intelligent choices about
    color temperature and so on when you bring the image into Photoshop in
    order to get maximum image quality.

    If you batch process a bunch of RAW format images with the same
    settings, and then save them in JPEG format, you have lost these
    benefits, and may as well have just shot JPEG to begin with.
     
    tacit, May 31, 2006
    #7
  8. "If ...": true. But some people process their raws in (say) Bridge+ACR,
    without going near Photoshop-the-photoeditor. (Or, in CS, Browser+ACR).
    Their ACR edits and settings get stored, perhaps in the database, or as
    XMPsidecars, or (as I do it) in the DNGs (CS2 only).

    Then when the Batch is run, perhaps while you have a meal, all of these
    settings get applied to the raw image as part of the conversion to
    JPEGs or TIFFs (or PSDs). It can be an effective workflow - I got it
    from Bruce Fraser's books on Camera Raw. (I use my own actions rather
    than Image Processor script, but I am assuming that the same applies
    for the script?)
     
    Barry Pearson, May 31, 2006
    #8
  9. The downside of doing this is that you lose the benefit of shooting in
    RAW to begin with.

    There is an advantage to shooting RAW images rather than JPEG
    images--the RAW image is not compressed and preserves information about
    the exposure settings, allowing you to make intelligent choices about
    color temperature and so on when you bring the image into Photoshop in
    order to get maximum image quality.

    If you batch process a bunch of RAW format images with the same
    settings, and then save them in JPEG format, you have lost these
    benefits, and may as well have just shot JPEG to begin with.
    [/QUOTE]

    I am fully aware of this - however, what is to stop me going back to a few
    images in RAW and manually adjusting exposure settings etc.? I shot in RAW
    thinking that most of my shots should be ok but I could have the opportunity
    to change settings if I needed to. Therefore, for most of the images a
    straight conversion to jpeg will suffice, but its nice to be able to change
    settings if I need to. Makes sense to me!
    Allan
     
    Allan M. Bruce, May 31, 2006
    #9
  10. The downside of doing this is that you lose the benefit of shooting in
    RAW to begin with.[/QUOTE]

    If you read the earlier messages, you'll see that this person is well
    aware of that. He said "I meant: I will batch convert all of them, then
    if there are any pictures which need altering I will work from the
    original RAW data again."
    I think that the OP knows that.
    But then you do not have RAW files for 'just in case'. And this was a
    borrowed camera, so perhaps it was set to RAW by the owner, not by
    choice of the OP.
     
    Johan W. Elzenga, May 31, 2006
    #10
  11. Thanks for the help guys, I managed to do it by selecting all of the files
    in Bridge, then double clicking on one. They then all opened in PS, then I
    selected all and clicked save, nice n easy.
    Allan
     
    Allan M. Bruce, May 31, 2006
    #11
  12. Allan M. Bruce

    Falco98 Guest

    My camera (canon EOS 300d) comes with a utility to extract the embedded
    jpegs from an arbitrarily large number of RAW files. It's relatively
    quick since in Canon's case, the RAW file has a medium-rez jpeg embedded
    in it already, but I believe the utility also does straight conversions
    (i.e. at max resolution etc); i'd be surprised if the manufacturer of
    the camera you've been using doesn't make such a utility (and with
    canon, the utility is downloadable free on their website).
     
    Falco98, Jun 5, 2006
    #12
  13. Allan M. Bruce

    kctan Guest

    Raw files are meant to be processed with individual manipulation, no batch
    conversion. You can batch process with same manipulation if shots were of
    similar shooting conditions (color temp, dynamic range, lighting...etc) or
    you defeat the purpose of shooting in raw.
     
    kctan, Jun 6, 2006
    #13
  14. Allan M. Bruce

    Marijn Guest

    Its easy. Select all the files in bridge en open them all at once. The RAW
    converter will open. Now reselect all pictures (the will be on the left
    side). And then on the lower right side press a button called something like
    'save ... (where the dots are the number of files selected). Then wait.

    In bridge you can touch up any one of them or a selection if required.
     
    Marijn, Jun 8, 2006
    #14
  15. Allan M. Bruce

    SerGe

    Joined:
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    batch convert RAW to Jpeg

    try ivan image converter to convert your raw images to jpeg in batch mode or with command line. This software supports 170 input and >40 output image formats. find it here: ivanview.com/ivan-image-converter.html
     
    SerGe, Sep 21, 2009
    #15
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