"Battery Empty" problem with fully charged batteries

Discussion in 'Photography' started by BE, Jan 27, 2008.

  1. BE

    BE Guest

    I have an Olympus D595 5MP Digital Camera with 3x Optical Zoom, bought about
    2.5 years ago. I can no longer get it to start. No matter what set of
    fully-charged batteries I put into it, I get the "battery empty" screen and
    it immediately shuts down.

    I have cleaned all the battery contacts inside the battery cavity and also
    those of the batteries with a pencil eraser.

    The camera will mount on the desktop of my computer when connected via the
    USB cable.

    I have seen this problem discussed on several sites, but no good answers
    given for what is causing it, aside from dirty battery contacts.

    Am I going to need to purchase another camera?

    Thanks

    Be
     
    BE, Jan 27, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. BE

    Joel Guest

    I don't have Olympus but I can tell you that in general *both* Film (not
    very old film camera) and Digital cemaras often have or require TWO
    batteries.

    1. A small battery to keep camera alive (storing information like Date,
    Name, Setting etc..), and this usually last for several years depending on
    how much you use (I guess because I still keep the Olympus C-2100 and the
    battery is still working .. and I did buy an spare battry few months after I
    got the camera)

    - This small battery often hide inside the the place where battery or
    memory card is.

    2. A Regular Large battery that you use to photograph, flah, zoom etc. that
    you charge now and then, or the one you just CHARGED. This has nothing to
    do with the life of camera.
     
    Joel, Jan 27, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. BE

    BE Guest

    I would have thought those setting would be saved in non-volatile ram. I
    will investigate - thanks!

    Be
     
    BE, Jan 27, 2008
    #3
  4. From: "BE" <>


    |
    | I would have thought those setting would be saved in non-volatile ram. I
    | will investigate - thanks!
    |
    | Be

    This is the same as a desktop computer. The time-clock can NOT work in non-volatile RAM.
    I presume your camera has a time-clock and shows the date and time.
     
    David H. Lipman, Jan 28, 2008
    #4
  5. BE

    Joel Guest

    RAM is the chip where the camera stores information, but RAM and camera
    need power (battery) to keep it alive and functional. Same with computer,
    there is a battery to keep the CMOS setting.

    BTW, good luck with your camera, and I hope it's the battery (sounds like
    bettery is the problem) and you should be able to get battery from just
    about any local store like Target, Wal-Marts etc.. and it may cost $2-3
     
    Joel, Jan 28, 2008
    #5
  6. BE

    T Shadow Guest

    Batteries are most likely but chargers fail too. Still using one set of
    batteries after 8 years. Tossed the other set I started with a few years ago
    when I thought they failed. Later realized the charger would sometimes fail
    to fully charge the right pair.
     
    T Shadow, Jan 28, 2008
    #6
  7. BE

    BE Guest

    I just wonder... My user's guide makes NO mention of any other batteries
    except the AA ones that power normal operation. If they keep the user in the
    dark about this "other" battery, then it would stand to reason that many
    people would just chuck the camera and buy a new one. Do you think they
    would purposely not mention this battery (if it has one)?

    Be
     
    BE, Jan 28, 2008
    #7
  8. BE

    T Shadow Guest

    Haven't reset the time in my camera in 8 years. Surprises me but the manual
    says it will lose time after several days without power. Must have been
    close several times. Don't remember ever seeing that before and I'm that
    rare breed that actually reads the manual. The camcorder I do remember. It
    just says you have a short amount of time. Inferring not much longer than it
    takes to recharge the battery. So they must use capacitors.
     
    T Shadow, Jan 28, 2008
    #8
  9. BE

    Dudley Hanks Guest

    It may be hard-wired into the camera with the expectation that the camera
    will be out-dated by the time the battery wears out.

    If that is the case, happy camera shopping.

    But, you might want to look over the whole camera with a keen eye, looking
    for anything that looks like a small sliding cover. Sometimes, certain
    details are missed during production of the manual.

    If your budget will allow, you might want to look at a new unit. My wife
    and eye purchased a Canon A70 a few years ago for about $350, with a 3 meg
    sensor. The sensor chip recently stopped functioning, so we got a new
    camera.

    The new one, a Canon A720 (for $220), is an 8 meg unit with a better optical
    zoom, better video capabilities, a nicer display panel, better white balance
    detection, and a higher ISO range, just to name a few things.

    Technology is moving quickly, and it's nice when you can play with the new
    stuff.

    Good Luck,
    Dudley
     
    Dudley Hanks, Jan 28, 2008
    #9
  10. BE

    Joel Guest

    It's possible but we have to assume that the regular battery is ok as the
    OP stated, and the battery doesn't have to be full charged for camera to
    give some info.
     
    Joel, Jan 28, 2008
    #10
  11. BE

    Joel Guest

    It may and should have some information, but the problem that most of us
    don't realize its existing, and don't know where or what to look for. And I
    knew it because I read it many many years ago, and it happened to my film
    camera once.

    Also, it uses battery similar to Hearing-Aid, Watch bettery (micro
    battery)
     
    Joel, Jan 28, 2008
    #11
  12. BE

    Rob Morley Guest

    AKA "button cell"
     
    Rob Morley, Jan 28, 2008
    #12
  13. BE

    BE Guest

    It will be interesting to see how Olympus responds to my email concerning
    this problem.

    Be
     
    BE, Jan 28, 2008
    #13
  14. BE

    Joel Guest

    Thanks for the word, sometime I have problem finding the right word so
    most of the time I just go by what I read/heard before .... sometime it
    could be few days to decade(s) ago <bg>.
     
    Joel, Jan 28, 2008
    #14
  15. BE

    Joel Guest

    Because this battery isn't very common so they may and may not remember
    it, unless you mention it to them then they may tell you where the battery
    is. Or if you monitor some digital camera forum then you may hear about
    this type of battery may be 1-2 every 1-2 years or so (very rare).
     
    Joel, Jan 28, 2008
    #15
  16. BE

    Cats Guest

    And in the UK at least there are quite a few different sizes of them.
     
    Cats, Jan 28, 2008
    #16
  17. BE

    Joel Guest

    We have so many different sizes and they are getting smaller and thinner
    every day. Lets see, digital camera uses it (pretty large because larger
    usually have larger capacity to last longer), wrist watch, hearing-aid,
    laser beam, flash light, car remote control, pen for tablet (older type),
    many bluetooth device, toy, even kid shoe .. thousands of them <bg>
     
    Joel, Jan 28, 2008
    #17
  18. BE

    krishnananda Guest

    If they are anything like camcorders then yes, they expect you to chuck
    it when the internal battery dies. I have a Canon Mini DV camcorder from
    a few years back. Every time I turn it on, even when plugged directly
    into the AC adapter, it immediately asks me to to set the date and
    time. The internal battery died and nowhere in the documentation or on
    Canon's website are there any instructions on how to change it or even
    the fact that it exists.

    And of course a competent repair place would charge many times the
    camera's value to dig out the old battery and replace it. The value of
    anything but high-end digital photo and video gear plummets faster than
    a used Edsel when driven off the used car dealer's lot.

    In the bad old days of CMOS batteries in computers they were soldered
    onto the motherboard. I managed to exchange exactly one battery on an
    old 386 notebook by unsoldering it and resoldering in a replacement
    obtained from some obscure computer parts supplier. More recently
    working on Macs I managed to get a copy of the Mac repair parts and
    procedures CD (eBay is your friend) and since the batteries are no
    longer soldered in place I have successfully replaced several
    motherboard batteries.

    The Canon mini DV is now relegated to stop-motion capture. I don't keep
    a battery or tape in it; it is just a FireWire camera feeding directly
    into my Mac. Because I don't depend on time code generated by the camera
    I don't care what the date display is. Otherwise I would have
    drip-kicked it long ago.

    Remember, if the manufacturers didn't expect their products to be
    disposable how would they ever sell the next "generation"?

    --k
     
    krishnananda, Jan 29, 2008
    #18
  19. BE

    T Shadow Guest

    Batteries are installed serial. One bad one kills all of them. Trouble
    shooting seldom gets easier when you assume you know what the problem is. At
    least if your not psychic. Just because the batteries have been on a charger
    does not mean they have to be in a charged state. If he had stated he
    checked the batteries under load and gave numbers I might have believed he
    actually knows. Can't imagine why someone would ask if they knew what they
    were doing.
     
    T Shadow, Jan 29, 2008
    #19
  20. BE

    Cats Guest

    Have you tried emailing Olympus?
     
    Cats, Jan 29, 2008
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.