Battery life and why?

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Peter James, Apr 28, 2004.

  1. Peter James

    Peter James Guest

    Perhaps someone could tell a non-technical ignoramus like me why it
    was that the batteries on my old Canon EOS 600 with a motor drive and
    with a auto-focus motor to drive, would last for months, whilst the
    re-chargeable batteries on my new Canon A80 last for three days.
    During that period I would have put at least 10 to 20 rolls of film
    through it! Am I missing something perhaps?
     
    Peter James, Apr 28, 2004
    #1
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  2. Peter James

    Colm Guest

    Digital cameras use more power because they've got more electronics to run.
    LCD, file conversions/resizing etc....
     
    Colm, Apr 28, 2004
    #2
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  3. Peter James

    Dave Cohen Guest

    Something is wrong, it's either the camera, batteries or a charging problem.
    I get 200 -300 shots on canon A40.
    Dave Cohen
     
    Dave Cohen, Apr 28, 2004
    #3
  4. Peter James

    Colm Guest

    The OP didn't specify how many shots he was taking in the 3 days. It could
    be 200-300.
    Or he could be using it's review feature constantly.
    Or the rechargeables might be 600mAh.
    Or........
     
    Colm, Apr 28, 2004
    #4
  5. Peter James

    Peter James Guest

    Maybe ten shots, and I don't use the review feature unless essential,
    as I know it drains power. The rechargeables are 1850 Nimh new as of
    three months ago.
     
    Peter James, Apr 29, 2004
    #5
  6. Peter James

    Colm Guest

    In that case, if I were in your shoes....
    I'd test the camera with a 2nd set of batteries. If the results were the
    same I'd return the camera for fixin'.
    What you're seeing isn't normal.
     
    Colm, Apr 29, 2004
    #6
  7. Peter James

    Peter James Guest

    The same results with a second set of batteries. And yes, I'm
    returning the camera to Canon U.K. for checking and fixing. Thanks.
     
    Peter James, Apr 30, 2004
    #7
  8. Peter James

    Ken Weitzel Guest

    This issue was discussed in depth sometime during the
    past year.

    I think if you check individual cells you'll find that
    only one of the set is going dead.

    It turned out that the battery cover was designed in
    such way that it allowed a bit of a short to exist.

    Perhaps with any luck that poster is still reading and
    will re-post his cure for you; or failing that you
    might be able to dig it out of one of the
    rec.photo.digital archive sites.

    Take care.

    Ken
     
    Ken Weitzel, May 2, 2004
    #8
  9. Peter James

    Z Z Guest

    Interesting-I was gullible and bought a nondigital camera with a
    motorized zoom at Big Lots-its batteries go dead in about a halfhour :)

    Vivitar ZM50P-DB
     
    Z Z, May 2, 2004
    #9
  10. Peter James

    O R Guest

    Months is an awfully long time for batteries to last on one charge.
    They couldn't have been advancing many rolls of film.

    Perform an experiment. Charge the batteries and then take them out of
    your camera. Let them sit on the shelf for a week, two weeks, three
    weeks. If they hold their charge, then you know that the camera was
    draining them. If they lose their charge just as quickly as they did
    when in your camera, you know that it's the batteries.

    Are you using a different charger for these batteries than you used for
    the batteries with your old camera? When the light goes on telling you
    that the batteries are fully charged, they probably aren't. Leave them
    in your charger for an additional hour or two to see if that makes a
    difference.

    Are you using your camera's built-in flash? That draws a LOT of
    current.
     
    O R, May 2, 2004
    #10
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