Best laptop lcd monitor for color acuracy?

Discussion in 'Photoshop Tutorials' started by bogus, Jan 22, 2006.

  1. bogus

    bogus Guest

    I see that this subject has been touched on before, but would like to
    know if anyone has current information. I will need to "go portable"
    fairly soon. I am currently using a color-managed workflow with my
    desktop system, and would like to duplicate that workflow on a
    laptop-based system. so, any recommendations for a laptop with an lcd
    that can be reliably calibrated using eye-one? I have taken a look at
    the sony with the x-brite, and it looks nice, but, aside from the
    salesman's assurances, I have no idea whether or not I can calibrate
    this screen

    thanks

    Jack
     
    bogus, Jan 22, 2006
    #1
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  2. bogus

    Walterius Guest

    It is my (possibly ignorant) understanding that attempting to calibrate an
    LCD monitor, laptop or not, is a waste of time? Perhaps you could attach a
    CRT to the laptop when you had to use it for color-sensitive work?

    Walterius
    Old and possiblky ignorant in Fort Lauderdale
     
    Walterius, Jan 23, 2006
    #2
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  3. bogus

    tacit Guest

    Some LCDs are better than others. The high-brightness LCDs used on
    high-end Sony and Alienware systems and on new Powerbooks and Macbooks
    can be calibrated reasonably well; the LCDs used on low-end laptops are
    essentially impossible to calibrate and have very narrow fields of view.

    Using a CRT with a laptop is a good idea if you care about color
    accuracy.
     
    tacit, Jan 23, 2006
    #3
  4. bogus

    shadowdancer Guest

    I have dual monitors two different brands of crts over the two I have
    which are envision and a Sony the Sony is 100 % better on gamma plus it
    has a optional back light that you can adjust to suit your needs the
    envision I had for 4 months and had to send it back it went yellow on me
    it works again all colors correct but it isn't nearly as crisp as the Sony
     
    shadowdancer, Jan 30, 2006
    #4
  5. bogus

    BonusBear Guest

    Hi,

    Gonna jump in here, this is my first posting, i joined the group about
    ...hmmmmm....five seconds ago now, so hello and this is something i've
    been musing on lately anway.

    I recently started shooting straight into my laptop. My laptop screen
    isn't great but i've calibrated it with a color plus spyder and
    software and it's 300% better, so i would say go ahead and calibrate
    your lcd, you have nothing to lose.

    I always use a greyscale to calibrate to so i can tell by numbers alone
    that my colours are correct. For me, having an ok ish screen to proof
    on when shooting is good practise (if in a very perverse way) - if it
    looks good on a crappy screen it's going to look great on a good screen
    and will go to print great too.

    However, once shot everything goes onto a desktop and is viewed with a
    CRT - i'd never dream of retouching on the laptop, it lacks finesse big
    time.

    My CRT really needs replacing and i'm having a real dilemma - what
    should i replace it with? i really like the look of the formac gallery
    extreme (i could really do with the space it would save) but would it
    be better to stick with a CRT - are they really the only choice for
    critical work? if so which CRT, there's so much choice out
    there......??????

    hmmmmm... not sure i've answered the question so much as thrown in a
    few more, sorry if that's the case
     
    BonusBear, Feb 1, 2006
    #5
  6. bogus

    Al Dykes Guest

    Per a discussion with a guy that teaches and consults on process and
    color calibration for high-end commercial publications, The *best* LCD
    monitors are OK with the exception of color shift with off-angle
    viewing. This more of a problem as the LCD gets larger, which doesn't
    describe most laptops. AT the time, his beloved Sony had just been
    taken off the market because Sony had just stopped making Trinitron
    tubes and he was resigned to using LCDs.

    We didn't discuss laptops, specifically.
     
    Al Dykes, Feb 1, 2006
    #6
  7. bogus

    liz.barnard Guest

    Sony Trinitron! I've got a brilliant Sony Trinitron TV screen....can I
    hitch my laptop up to that? Or are the technologies incompatible? I
    doubt my TV has a USB port tho".

    Zizzie
     
    liz.barnard, Feb 2, 2006
    #7
  8. bogus

    liz.barnard Guest

    Sony Trinitron! I've got a brilliant Sony Trinitron TV screen....can I
    hitch my laptop up to that? Or are the technologies incompatible? I
    doubt my TV has a USB port tho".

    Zizzie
     
    liz.barnard, Feb 2, 2006
    #8
  9. bogus

    Mike Russell Guest


    For general Photoshop work the image will be too blurry, the refresh rate
    too slow (50 or 60 hz) and although there are profiles for NTSC and PAL, the
    colors will probably be quite different from what you would see with a
    normal monitor or on your printer.


    But my second monitor is a TV. A TV monitor can be useful if your images
    will be displayed on video, or if you want to record or view video using
    your computer.
     
    Mike Russell, Feb 2, 2006
    #9
  10. bogus

    Al Dykes Guest


    Does it have a color spyder built-in No? I didn't think so. :)

    What I ment by "trinitron" in the context of a Photoshop discussion
    was the premium version computer monitor sold to the graphics industry
    for (I'm told) about $2k. It came wth a spyder and existed becuase the
    Sony quality control step of the production line could select the best
    of the TV tubes that came off the line and divert them to this
    product.

    My friend said he replaced his, every two years to maintain accuracy.
     
    Al Dykes, Feb 2, 2006
    #10
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