Best mini digital camera : Nikon coolpix S9, Canon SD400, Pentax S7

Discussion in 'Pentax' started by aniramca, Nov 24, 2006.

  1. aniramca

    aniramca Guest

    Could anyone comments about mini digital camera, such as Nikon Coolpix
    S9, Canon SD400, Pentax S7, Casio Exilim EX-S600, etc?
    I like to have a good quality, durable and strong camera that I can put
    in my pocket. Unfortunately, Sony, Fuji, Olympus are out of the
    picture, as I only want a camera supported by SD cards.
    Among the top shown cameras, which one is the best?
    I don't mind about gadget like Wifi, big screen, etc. The important one
    is size, and therefore I have tentatively selected above. I am not
    looking anything larger than 6 megapixels. I think it is a good size
    quality and don't need anything larger than that. I now own a Panasonic
    Lumix/Leica, but rather big in size.I don't have any complaint and they
    have excellent picture quality. I must have clicked over 3000 shots,
    and still going strong. Does Panasonic/Lumix make a mini one like one
    of the above model? Perhaps not in the same range price such as the
    above list (i.e more expensive)?
    Is Nikon lens better than Canon or Pentax lenses? The Casio exilim has
    excellent large screen, but a little to skinny for me and therefore
    awkward in the hand. SD 400 or Pentax S7 seems perfect on my hand.
    Nikon S9 is a little to thin, but I like the Nikon brand name.
    Which one is more rugged? I also owned an older Pentax Optio 30, and I
    noticed picture quality is just a notch lower than my Panasonic/Lumix
    (perhaps unnoticable by regular photographers).
    any comments on the above cameras?
    Thanks for info.
     
    aniramca, Nov 24, 2006
    #1
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  2. aniramca

    Tony Polson Guest


    The Panasonic DMC-LX2 is fairly small and has excellent performance at
    low ISOs. It has a "Leica" 28-112mm (equivalent) lens and a 16:9 wide
    aspect feature which is excellent for landscapes. The rear LCD is
    large at 2.8 inches. It has Panasonic's very impressive Mega Optical
    image stabiliser to help eliminate the effects of camera shake.

    As you posted this to a UK newsgroup I assume you are in the UK. The
    Panasonic DMC-LX2 comes in silver or black finish and sells here for
    as little as £270 (www.ebuyer.com).

    There is a Leica version of the same camera - the D-Lux 3 - that sells
    for as much as £490, but you get a longer no-quibble Leica Passport
    warranty which covers accidental damage, and a nice leather case.

    Whether this is worth the additional £220 is a moot point. The Leica
    version lacks the hand grip of the Panasonic and is more difficult to
    hold, though it looks very nice. <g>

    [In case the pound sterling sign got munged, the prices are GBP 270
    for the Panasonic DMC-LX2 and GBP 490 for the Leica D-Lux 3, a
    difference of GBP 220.]
     
    Tony Polson, Nov 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. aniramca

    Guest Guest

    I am looking for the same thing as you.
    I had a HP 707 that I carried in my shirt pocket as a go everywhere camera.
    After about 30 months of uses It needs to be replaced.
    I am looking at the Nikon P4, 8MP X 3.5 Optical zoom, vibration reduction
    with 2 years warranty for $299,00 CAD.
    My other choice is the Samsung 530, 5.1MP X 3.0 Optical zoom with 1 year
    warranty for $129.00 CAD. The dpreviews gives it a 4 1/2 stars.
    As I have learned most Cameras are designed to operate at a max. of 80-90
    degree of relative humidity and a not to exceed around 90 degrees of heat.
    So should I pay big money for a pocket camera that will have a life span of
    approx. 30 months?
    The Luminix/Leica is my first choice for artistic shots and far away
    subjects. However, its size makes me look conspicuous and it does not carry
    as well as a small camera that fits into your shirt pocket. Unless I hear
    negative feedbacks at the end of the day I may go with the Samsung 530 at
    $129.00 CAD and replace it when it stops working?
     
    Guest, Nov 24, 2006
    #3
  4. aniramca

    Guest Guest

    The Nikon P4 uses SD card and an a supplied proprietary rechargeable 3.7
    volts ion battery and charger. The Samsung 530 uses SD card and comes with
    two supplied alkaline AA batteries with no charger? I already have NiMh
    rechargeable batteries.
     
    Guest, Nov 24, 2006
    #4
  5. aniramca

    thoss Guest

    One point you might like to bear in mind is: does the camera have an
    optical viewfinder? They seem to be vanishing fast, but some Canons
    seem to still have them.
     
    thoss, Nov 24, 2006
    #5
  6. If you want to stay with Panasonic, the FX series (I'm not sure off-hand
    what the latest model is) is roughly the equivalent of the Canon SD and
    so forth. They also make the LX series, which is a bit bigger, has a
    higher-end lens, full manual controls, and costs quite a bit more.

    -dms
     
    Daniel Silevitch, Nov 24, 2006
    #6
  7. aniramca

    minnesøtti Guest

    Panasonic FX01. Or, its successor FX03. Or, maybe the FX01's successor
    is FX50 or FX07 ? I tottally got lost in thos cameras. They look so
    much the same, and have very similar features.

    They are small. Just what you need.
     
    minnesøtti, Nov 24, 2006
    #7
  8. aniramca

    minnesøtti Guest

    Optical viewfinder is a toss (ha-ha). Who needs them besides the old
    geezers ?
     
    minnesøtti, Nov 24, 2006
    #8
  9. aniramca

    Geoff Berrow Guest

    People who want to take unblurred pictures in daylight?
     
    Geoff Berrow, Nov 24, 2006
    #9
  10. aniramca

    Guest Guest

    One point you might like to bear in mind is: does the camera have an
    optical viewfinder? They seem to be vanishing fast, but some Canons
    seem to still have them.
    --
    Thoss

    The Samsung 530 has an optical view finder and a LCD viewer. The Nikon only
    has a larger LCD viewer.
    I spoke to the technician at Nikon.CA and his answer was that Nikon is
    responding the people preferences.
    Plus it takes less space not having an optical view finder and does not add
    up to the cost of the camera.
    I am from the old school and I find it faster to capture an image using an
    optical view finder than a larger LCD screen.
    Especially when you are doing outdoor activities like canoeing, skiing,
    sailing etc etc.
     
    Guest, Nov 24, 2006
    #10
  11. aniramca

    minnesøtti Guest

    This thread is not about discussing whether it is better to have the
    optical viewfinder in the modern P&S or not (this is the same kind of
    discussion -- what is better, Mac or PC ?).

    I agree it is faster to use the optical viewfinder when you are
    canoeing or sailing. However, the modern digital P&S aren't fast (the
    shutter lag is about half a second). If you want a fast camera, you
    need the camera which is pre-focussed and pre-set for aperture and
    exposure time. That's where you might want an optical VF. It is a
    different beast to the modern digital P&S cameras.
     
    minnesøtti, Nov 24, 2006
    #11
  12. aniramca

    J. Clarke Guest

    How does using the optical finder help you avoid that? If you've got
    daylight you can use a high shutter speed so camera movement is not an
    issue and there's no focusing aid in the finder so it doesn't improve
    focus, thus I don't see any real benefit to using it except where there is
    sunlight directly on the LCD, but even there a piece of cardboard takes
    care of the problem.
     
    J. Clarke, Nov 24, 2006
    #12
  13. aniramca

    Guest Guest

    This thread is about " Could anyone comments about mini digital camera,
    such as Nikon Coolpix
    S9, Canon SD400, Pentax S7, Casio Exilim EX-S600, etc?
    I like to have a good quality, durable and strong camera that I can put
    in my pocket."
    My observations are: you can get a suitable camera like the Nikon P4 without
    a view finder or camera that have both a view finder and LCD screen. It up
    the the users preferences. Sure there are many good digital cameras on the
    market that can suit the original thread requirement. However, knowing that
    carrying a camera in your shirt pocket every day of the week may reduce its
    longevity.
    At $129.00 CAD with a 4 1/2 stars DPreview, a view finder and LCD screen
    the Samsung 530 is worth placing on the short list as a go everywhere
    camera.
    Not to mention that the Samsung 530 uses an SD card and conventional AA
    batteries. The other camera to consider would be the Canon PowerShot A530
     
    Guest, Nov 24, 2006
    #13
  14. aniramca

    Guest Guest

    " I don't see any real benefit to using it except where there is
    sunlight directly on the LCD, but even there a piece of cardboard takes
    care of the problem."
    The idea of using a piece of cardboard is doable.
    When I am going downhill on my skis and the sun behind me reflecting on
    white snow I do not feel comfortable using a piece of cardboard nor would I
    be able to.
    The same thing takes place when sailing, I have to steer my boat and the
    subject has to be captured quickly.
    If I am standing still then I can arranged to have some shielding from the
    sun and press on the trigger at the most pertinent time.
     
    Guest, Nov 24, 2006
    #14
  15. aniramca

    Steve B Guest

    Uh, people who want to compose their picture and view all the icons on the
    viewer? Those who want to use manual mode and adjust focus? Those who want
    to be able to see what they're taking a photo of when it's bright sunlight
    outside, and the back screen washes out from bright light?

    Just a couple of guesses.
     
    Steve B, Nov 24, 2006
    #15
  16. aniramca

    thoss Guest

    And what's wrong being an old geezer? You will probably be one some
    day.
     
    thoss, Nov 24, 2006
    #16
  17. aniramca

    thoss Guest

    Also those who want to steady the camera against their foreheads rather
    than holding it at shaking-arms length.
     
    thoss, Nov 24, 2006
    #17
  18. aniramca

    thoss Guest

    This thread is about advising the OP as to which camera to buy. And the
    presence or absence of an optical viewfinder may well sway him one way
    or another.
     
    thoss, Nov 24, 2006
    #18
  19. aniramca

    J. Clarke Guest

    Personally if the requirement is for "durable and strong that I can put
    in my pocket" the Olympus Stylus 720SW is the obvious choice. Drop it,
    roll your kayak, fall off your surfboard, it doesn't care.
     
    J. Clarke, Nov 24, 2006
    #19
  20. aniramca

    J. Clarke Guest

    ??? I'm sorry, but how does the optical finder let you do that?
    What point-and-shoot has an optical finder that is useful in adjusting
    focus?
    Piece of cardboard and some duct tape fixes that.
     
    J. Clarke, Nov 24, 2006
    #20
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