best settings for a concert venue

Discussion in 'Photography' started by nobody, May 30, 2008.

  1. nobody

    nobody Guest

    Hello,
    I have a Canon S1 is and have only used it a few times so I am a complete
    novice. I am going to be going to a concert and would like to be able to get
    some good pictures. what would be the best settings for the conditions that
    would be at a concert, low light, stage lights etc.

    remember I am very new to this camera and photography so please be as basic
    as possible in your suggestions

    Thanks in advance
     
    nobody, May 30, 2008
    #1
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  2. That's an easy one! Here ya go in simple numbered steps:

    1. Point your browser at
    <http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/0900001310/PSS1ISCUG-EN.pdf>

    2. Download the attached special file that will set your camera for you

    3. Open the special file, note that it is the CAMERA MANUAL

    4. READ IT -- all 167 pages. Should take you about 15 minutes

    5. Remember the technical term for this maneuver: "Read The F***ing
    Manual" or "RTFM" for short.

    We now return to our regular programming.
     
    Usenet Police, May 30, 2008
    #2
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  3. nobody

    nobody Guest

    Thanks asshole
     
    nobody, May 30, 2008
    #3
  4. nobody

    Peter Guest


    Step 1. Make sure photos are allowed.

    Step2. If the answer to step 1 is yes, set your ISO for about 800 and point
    and click away. DO NOT USE FLASH during the performance. It disturbs the
    artists and annoys the heck out of the audience. Bring plenty of memory
    cards and extra batteries. Actually you were given some good advice when you
    were told to RTFM. Get as close to the stage as you can, then turn around.
    The ;audience will give you some of your best shots.
     
    Peter, May 31, 2008
    #4
  5. nobody

    JT's Ghost Guest

    Check to see *if* the venue allows photography...

    Do Not Use a Flash!

    Set your Camera's ISO to 400 (it will not go any higher).

    Get as close as possible to the stage.

    Take your pictures when the stage lighting is the brightest.

    FWIW: this camera isn't what you want for this type of photography as
    the ISO range (50-400) isn't all that great. The good news is that you
    do have an image stabilizer in the camera. Good luck.


    - JT
    knows that you need to take lots of photos before you get good at it
     
    JT's Ghost, May 31, 2008
    #5
  6. nobody

    ransley Guest

    You need tripod or monopd, but at iso 400 you may not get anything
    unless you are close enough to where stage lights fill the frame and
    stage light is bright enough, and if the band moves alot you may get
    nothing. I dont know the camera or how fast the lens is, it may be to
    slow, it has to be wide open and it probably changes f stop with zoom,
    With IS you might shoot at 1/30th. You need to be real close and try
    it. But you have to learn the camera, and basics first.
     
    ransley, May 31, 2008
    #6
  7. nobody

    Dudley Hanks Guest

    You need tripod or monopd, but at iso 400 you may not get anything
    unless you are close enough to where stage lights fill the frame and
    stage light is bright enough, and if the band moves alot you may get
    nothing. I dont know the camera or how fast the lens is, it may be to
    slow, it has to be wide open and it probably changes f stop with zoom,
    With IS you might shoot at 1/30th. You need to be real close and try
    it. But you have to learn the camera, and basics first.

    Tripods and monopods are basically useless in a concert setting. Too many
    people and not enough room equals no pics and pissed off people around you.

    For a novice, I'd say use the highest ISO settings on the camera and don't
    expect to enlarge your pics much larger than 5 x7 or 8 x10.

    Use the aperture priority setting since it will automatically give you the
    fastest shutter speed your camera will expose properly for the lighting..

    Prior to the concert, practice holding the camera still for longer
    exposures. Hold the camera as steady as you can, slowly squeeze the release
    without jerking it., and keep your arms close to your body.

    Don't use the flash. Even if you are in the front row, I doubt it will do
    anything.

    However, if I were shooting a concert using the Canon S1, I'd opt for video
    mode. Bring as many memory cards as you can. Wait for your favourite songs
    and make a video. The results will probably be better than stills.

    Good Luck,
    Dudley
     
    Dudley Hanks, May 31, 2008
    #7
  8. Excellent advice, Dudley. But I'd emphasize one thing above all: make sure
    they allow photography before you get turned away for having a camera.
    Sure, pleople sneak in point and shoots all the time, but security has been
    known to take them away once they see the flash go off (and don't you *dare*
    use a flash!). I've been a photojournalist for years, and know that only a
    small handful of venues allow photography of a concert.

    -- Theo Benson, Grizzly Glen Photography
     
    Ursus Californicus, May 31, 2008
    #8
  9. nobody

    Wilson Guest

    A couple of years ago I was at a Loudon Wainwright III concert when a woman
    on the 4th or 5th row who had a I&SO camera, stood up, and made a flash
    photo of Loudon. It had been announced a the beginning of the concert that
    there were to be no photographs. Loudon immediately stopped mid song, took
    a long look at the woman, and started fumbling around in a coat pocket that
    was hidden from view by his guitar. No one knew what he was about to do.
    People were getting a little nervous. What Loudon did was pull out a his
    own P&S camera and take a flash photo of the woman who had taken his photo.
    He put the camera back in his pocket and picked up the song where he had
    stopped and never said a word about it.

    No more photographs were taken by anyone for the rest of the evening.
     
    Wilson, May 31, 2008
    #9
  10. nobody

    Wilson Guest

    I have no idea what a I&SO camera is. She had a point & shoot camera. I
    wasn't paying close attention when I did that.
     
    Wilson, May 31, 2008
    #10
  11. nobody

    Joel Guest

    Very interesting story!
     
    Joel, May 31, 2008
    #11
  12. nobody

    Peter Guest

    Most of of suffer at one time, or another from dyslexic fingers.
     
    Peter, May 31, 2008
    #12
  13. nobody

    Dudley Hanks Guest

    Yeah, that's the really big one I tend to forget all the time.

    When I was shooting concerts, I always had backstage passes or press
    credentials. I never had to worry about that aspect, so it's not one of the
    things that comes easily to mind when someone asks for advice on concert
    shooting tips.

    I've got to make a mental note to remember that one.

    Thanks,
    Dudley
     
    Dudley Hanks, May 31, 2008
    #13
  14. nobody

    jrblack10 Guest

    There was many good advise listed above. Make sure photography is
    allowed. Get as close to the stage as possible. Higher the ISO the
    better, but I see you are limited to 400 and that wont get you much.
    One good one I seen above is make sure to turnaround and get the
    audiance. I forgot that when I shot a concert.

    I shot a concert once. Won front row seats. Asked the 2 person crew
    with cameras if I could take pictures and walk about like they were
    and there was no problem. I shot with a Nikon D50, set the camera on
    shutter priority with shutter speed to 80th/sec and snapped away. No
    flash. performers may not like it but all it does is light up all the
    smoke, haze, dust, etc from the stage performance. I was quite
    impressed with what I got. You can take a look here.
    http://blog.capturethisphoto.com/post/2008/02/Winter-Jam-Concert.aspx

    Be sure to check out the "View all _______ pictures here" links after
    each performer.
     
    jrblack10, Jun 6, 2008
    #14
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