Best way to create ghosts/special effects/fx in Adobe Premiere Pro 2.0 HD or Final Cut Pro HD? Whic

Discussion in 'Amateur Video Production' started by drelliot, Aug 6, 2006.

  1. drelliot

    drelliot Guest

    drelliot, Aug 6, 2006
    #1
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  2. Depends on what kind of ghosts and what they are supposed to be able to
    do. You can do many tricks for ghostly FX without even opening up AE or
    another compositor. You can do things as simple as shooting a clean
    plate of the scene, layering the two tracks and putting a soft wipe in
    there. You can do luminance or chromakeys. Or you can do
    sophisticated 3D CGI. Tell us what the scene is and what your
    expectations are, and any number of folks will suggest how best to make
    it come about for you.
     
    nobody special, Aug 6, 2006
    #2
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  3. drelliot

    RS Guest

    Editing programs, easier to learn but more difficult to do complex
    effects. AE and Motion, hard to learn, but better suited for very
    complex effects.

    All however will take time and practice and an understanding of layers,
    transfer modes, masks and keyframes as well as a large group of
    additional properties.
     
    RS, Aug 7, 2006
    #3
  4. If you're not in a big hurry, my last column running in Videomaker
    Magazine (I resigned my contributing editorship to concentrate on my new
    product (www.starteditingnow.com) - will appear in the October 2006
    issue - and is (drumroll please) a step-by-step tutorial on making
    ghosts appear in your Halloween videos!

    Whoops, sorry that's FALL FESTIVAL videos for those of you in schools or
    other institutions who are proscribed from mentioning pagan holidays.;)

    Should hit the news stands in about a month.
     
    William Davis, Aug 9, 2006
    #4
  5. drelliot

    nsdcdon Guest

    I can offer a suggesstion based on a manual dissolve I created in
    Premiere- by dropping the opacity keyline of a top video layer to
    dissolve into the main track over 5 seconds.
    Try shooting your ghost image before a black background, boost contrast
    to lighten the highlights, and overlay it at 40-50% opacity. Try the
    same scene before a white background. Whatever works.
    Again I haven't tried this, but I plan to when i get my present project
    done.
     
    nsdcdon, Aug 9, 2006
    #5
  6. drelliot

    rebus Guest

    In FCP you can use composite modes to get that effect. Try
    Screen, Overlay, Hard Light, or Soft Light. Then adjust opacity
    to fine tune. These modes all make black transparent.

    Another thought, a black background with the light on the floor
    shining up. This will look creepy and keep the light off
    the background.

    Good luck!
     
    rebus, Aug 10, 2006
    #6
  7. Really, the easiest thing is to just lock down the camera shot, shoot
    five minutes of the empty room, or the empty room with your "alive"
    actor in it, pretending to react to a ghost. Then have your "ghost" do
    their thing alone in the room, again, the camera has not been touched
    or moved, not even to pause the tape. Line up the resulting tracks one
    above the other on the NLE timeline, set a partial dissolve or opacity
    level on the upper "ghost" track, and you are done. A variation of
    this, to do Haley Mills twins/clones/Evil Mirror Spocks talking to each
    other, works the same way, only you use a soft vertical wipe thru the
    shots to reveal the layers.

    To make it easier for the actors to interact timing-wise, bring an
    audio cassette boombox and mic to the set, record one actor's "take" to
    audio casette while you shoot it to video. Then play back the audio of
    that take on the boom box and the other actor, now in the shot, can
    hear and react to actual dialog and timing from the pre-taped
    performance. Makes a world of difference in the believeability of the
    final product.
     
    nobody special, Aug 10, 2006
    #7
  8. Forgot to add: while you are shooting the "clean plate", shoot some
    with a large table or something in it, then take the table out for the
    ghost pass. You then have an extra layer to play with to make the ghost
    walk right thru the table at some point. Sells the gag well. It is
    vital no other items or framings in the shot are changed in any way, or
    it gives away the gag.
     
    nobody special, Aug 10, 2006
    #8
  9. Martin Heffels, Aug 10, 2006
    #9
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