Black and white video to composite input?

Discussion in 'Video Cameras' started by D.M. Procida, Jan 15, 2005.

  1. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    A client has Miglia Director's Cut Take 2 - which can't take black and
    white video (from a CCTV). There's an adaptor available from Miglia,
    which I guess just converts the signal to composite or something
    similar, but is there something else they could use that they could get
    their hands on in a hurry (e.g. from Maplin)? I don't even know what the
    official name for these things is.

    Daniele
     
    D.M. Procida, Jan 15, 2005
    #1
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  2. On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 11:27:43 +0000,

    from here
    http://www.miglia.com/products/video/director2/
    i can see it accepts most inputs , so what is the output from the cctv
    system.
    the content is black and white , but what are the physical outputs

    bnc ?
    rca ?
    s-video ?
    rf ?

    one of above that the miglia doesn't have is bnc , and a bnc to rca is
    a simple sub- five pounds connector , even from maplin/pcworld
     
    Gary MacKenzie, Jan 15, 2005
    #2
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  3. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    Well, Miglia's device is here and costs a lot more than £5...:

    <http://www.miglia.com/products/video/BW_INabler/index.html>

    There's no indication of how it does what it does, but I presume it's
    not an empty box.

    Daniele
     
    D.M. Procida, Jan 15, 2005
    #3
  4. D.M. Procida

    :::Jerry:::: Guest

    message
    If the composite feed from the analogue camera is able to be displayed on a
    standard TV or monitor but is not compatible with a analogue to DV converter
    it would suggest that the analogue signal is probably lacking certain (un
    seen) lines and this 'box' basically re-sync's the analogue feed.

    All seems very mysterious to me, as you say, it's hardly likely to be an
    empty box !

    Does the analogue feed from the camera record onto a normal VCR ?
     
    :::Jerry::::, Jan 15, 2005
    #4
  5. Well, Miglia's device is here and costs a lot more than £5...:

    <http://www.miglia.com/products/video/BW_INabler/index.html>

    There's no indication of how it does what it does, but I presume it's
    not an empty box.

    Daniele[/QUOTE]
    well thats the first analogue system i've seen that won't accept b&w
    as a legal video feed.

    have you tried routing thru a normal video deck to see if that will
    fool the system into believing it is seeing a 'colour' image.

    £105 pounds to convert 'b&w' into 'colour' is rediculously.

    a canopus adc-100 can handle b&w without any clever/expensive addons.
    http://www.canopus-uk.com/US/products/ADVC110/pm_advc110.asp


    for the same price as the original miglia kit (269.00ex vat )he could
    have bought an advc110 bi-directional version(179 ex vat) and still
    have £90.00+vat spare


    i know what i would rather purchase
     
    Gary MacKenzie, Jan 15, 2005
    #5
  6. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    Good plan, I'll suggest that to them. Unfortunately I'm not in a
    position to try out various solutions, though luckily I'm not in a
    position where I have to either - they specified exactly what they
    wanted and I supplied it.

    It does seem to me - as someone else has suggested - that there is some
    kind of problem getting the Director's Cut to lock onto the incoming
    video, and that this little box feeds some kind of synchronisation
    signal into it.

    Daniele
     
    D.M. Procida, Jan 15, 2005
    #6
  7. Good plan, I'll suggest that to them. Unfortunately I'm not in a
    position to try out various solutions, though luckily I'm not in a
    position where I have to either - they specified exactly what they
    wanted and I supplied it.

    It does seem to me - as someone else has suggested - that there is some
    kind of problem getting the Director's Cut to lock onto the incoming
    video, and that this little box feeds some kind of synchronisation
    signal into it.

    Daniele[/QUOTE]

    agreed , BUT , maybe the customer needs guided when looking to do
    something like this , rather than the company accepting that the
    purchaser knows what they want to do.

    if the customer doesn't say what they want to do then it is their own
    fault.

    i work in education and spend a large proportion of my time sorting
    out this type of problem where students/staff bought what they thought
    they wanted , and the company selling didn't try to check exactly what
    they wanted to do.
     
    Gary MacKenzie, Jan 16, 2005
    #7
  8. D.M. Procida

    D.M. Procida Guest

    I don't think you actually know what you are talking about, since you
    weren't party to the conversations I had with the company.

    Daniele
     
    D.M. Procida, Jan 16, 2005
    #8
  9. The important point is the CCTV camera, the output from many small surveillance
    B&W cameras needs to be amplified before it can be used in any sort of direct
    feed.

    Monitors and many TVs are usually sensitive enough but it might be that
    Director's Cut Take 2, which takes its power from the firewire port, might
    require a pre-amp for B&W. I think that the B&W signal can be below 1v while
    the colour signal is between 1-2v - but this is from memory, I'm sure somebody
    will google to check :)

    Stuart

    www.mckears.com
     
    Stuart McKears, Jan 16, 2005
    #9
  10. D.M. Procida

    :::Jerry:::: Guest

    <snip>

    I assume you are the same person as the one from the "whisky trail ,
    scotland" ?
     
    :::Jerry::::, Jan 16, 2005
    #10
  11. I don't think you actually know what you are talking about, since you
    weren't party to the conversations I had with the company.

    Daniele[/QUOTE]

    ok so don't read the line after it.

    quote: 'if the customer doesn't say what they want to do then it is
    their own fault.'

    if you are saying they did tell you what they wanted to do
    .........................................
     
    Gary MacKenzie, Jan 16, 2005
    #11

  12. probably ..............................
     
    Gary MacKenzie, Jan 16, 2005
    #12
  13. D.M. Procida

    Deep Reset Guest

    Note that some simple CCTV cameras have only a nodding aquaintance with the
    relevant video specs (CCIR/PAL or RS-170/NTSC), and whilst they may produce
    acceptable images on an analogue monitor, digital capture devices may not
    always work. Nothing to do with signal levels, which are in the correct 1V
    range, more to do with the number of lines and correct sequence of pulses
    during blanking.
    I have a couple of cheap CCD and CMOS board cameras CCTV that won't display
    on either a pocket LCD TV/monitor, or capture to my analogue-in enabled
    camcorder, though capture to VHS is OK

    HTH

    Deep.
     
    Deep Reset, Jan 16, 2005
    #13
  14. D.M. Procida

    Stephen Neal Guest

    Standard 625/50 video has a black-white luminance voltage range of 0.7V,
    with the sync pulses extending below black level by 0.3V. Thus standard
    video is described as 1v pk-to-pk. It is normal for black level to be
    0V,with sync bottoms at -0.3V, and peak white at 0.7V - from memory, though
    many bits of kit can cope with fixed DC off-sets on this and use a "black
    level clamp" to detect the blanking level between the sync pulses and the
    video to "fix" the black level.

    I haven't heard of low cost kit outputting video at different voltage levels
    to these, but I have heard of cheap cameras not outputting fully standard
    video signals. In other words the sync pulses, blanking and equalisation
    pulses might be well out of standard, some may even have different numbers
    of video lines than the 312.5 lines per field (287.5 active) of the analogue
    video standard.

    This won't be an issue when feeding a monitor or TV for display, nor when
    recording on VHS (which basically just chucks fields of video onto the
    magnetic tape with no real processing in the way) However it might well be
    for video input solutions to PCs/Macs that clock the video into a
    field/frame store and look for much more tightly "speced" video.

    On the other hand it could just be that the lack of chroma burst is
    confusing the box - as it may be using chroma to set whether the source
    signal is PAL, NTSC or SECAM!

    Steve
     
    Stephen Neal, Jan 17, 2005
    #14
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