BW film for Portraiture?

Discussion in 'Australia Photography' started by [BnH], Oct 3, 2003.

  1. [BnH]

    [BnH] Guest

    Hi all,

    Just wondering what sort of 35mm BW film you normally use for portraiture ?
    Like those used for outdoor wedding shots ?

    I used Ilford FP4+ 125 during my gen ed course in the uni, and was quite
    happy with it.
    But somehow, I heard they have to be processed in a BW lab ? [not C41?]
    As now I can't use my uni facility to develop on my own, what sort of film
    do you recommend?
    I was speaking to a guy down in The Lab and he gave too much info .. and
    basically .. I am confused :p

    The most, it will be blown up to A4 size. [and if I was lucky to get a
    REALLY good shot, maybe poster :D]

    TIA

    =bob=
     
    [BnH], Oct 3, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. [BnH]

    Phil Guest

    Kodak T400CN - uses C41 process, and seems to be fairly fine grained
    (but i'm not a big BW user, so you might want to seek other opinions on it)

    Cheers,
    Phil
     
    Phil, Oct 3, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. [BnH]

    Michael Guest

    Hi Bob,

    I've used the new Fuji Acros quite successfully for portraiture. It has
    fantastic greys that are ideal for skin tones.

    I used it out in the city one day. No portraits but the results speak for
    themselves:

    http://www.uq.edu.au/~uqmclayt/photos/City BW/index.html

    However you will need to have it B&W processed so it may end up costing a
    bit more in the long run.

    Cheers
    Michael
     
    Michael, Oct 3, 2003
    #3
  4. [BnH]

    k Guest


    it depends on the look you want.. and the developer used I personally shoot
    Tmax100 and dev in Rodinal at 1+50 for a long deep tonal range with the
    sharpness only Rodinal offers, but then I'm big on skin texture (!)

    If you want something similar, the Fuji range (across etc) offers a good colour
    sensitivity with similar curves to the Tmax 100 but with a slightly courser
    grain - not noticable unless you peer closely, but the grain is definately
    courser. It has a slower toe than the Tmax as well, so you may get the
    impression that there's more discernable detail in the shadows than with the
    Tmax, though I prefer the sharp falloff of the Tmax better. Both exhibit a long
    slow shoulder so neither should block up unless you were to do something idiotic
    re agitation or dev times.

    I don't use the Ilford range for portraiture as I don't like the colour
    sensitivity curves, but the stuff is absolutely brilliant for chromework,
    aluminium or silver metals of any description. never figured out why, but it's
    exquisite for that sort of stuff.

    Back to developers for a moment. If you want nice sharp detail with THE most
    accutance, Rodinal is the king of all devs (also the oldest commercial dev) but
    if you're after a general all round, slightly softer dev then D76/ID-11 is a
    goodie. I must confess to liking the Ilford 'Ilfotech' (Plus) devs too, as well
    as HC-110 (Kodak) for smooth tonal ranges.. probably much more than ID11/D76.
    If you want anything softer or exhibiting less granularity - and you will
    definately sacrifice sharpness to achieve low grain, then look at Microphen.


    Read the above as my opinion only, and experiment a bit keeping accurate notes
    on what you've done.

    Oh, one last thing. When agitating during development bare in mind that one
    agitation per minute will give you sharper grain than once every 30 seconds :)

    Hope this helps

    k
     
    k, Oct 3, 2003
    #4
  5. [BnH]

    Greg Guest

    If you're getting it processed at your local lab (C41) then I would,
    and did go with the Kodak T400CN. I find it gave much more consistent
    results than Ilfords version. Ilford was quite harsh, espicially in
    the shadows. I found Kodak to give much more pleasing results in
    general.


    Cheers,
    Greg.



    Greg
    CT110 -> CBX250 -> GPX250 -> FZR250R -> FZR600 -> YZFR6
     
    Greg, Oct 4, 2003
    #5
  6. [BnH]

    Daniel ROCHA Guest

    Normally you can use everything ! :)
    http://www.monochromatique.com/portrait/
    Nice choice :)
    Why not processing at home ?
    If you must go to a lab perhaps a C41 b&w film process is better.
    The rendition may vary...

    --?
    <+> WEb ~ hTML ~ PhOTo <+>
    <http://www.monochromatique.com>
    Association de Photographes - <http://ecpa.eu.org>
    <http://fr.groups.yahoo.com/group/canoneos_fr>
     
    Daniel ROCHA, Oct 4, 2003
    #6
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.