Calibrated Monitor for Post Production:

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by Raskolnikov Alexis Friedemann, Dec 7, 2004.

  1. Any advice on brands or sizes? I've been using a 19" TV, which is
    obviously not the way to go since you can't calibrate it all that
    well. Should I get a 15" monitor and use that exclusively or get a 10"
    monitor and use that as a standard, but not as my primary viewing
    monitor. That is use the 10" and the big TV?
     
    Raskolnikov Alexis Friedemann, Dec 7, 2004
    #1
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  2. Raskolnikov Alexis Friedemann

    manitou910 Guest

    If you are doing any kind of paid/pro work, or anything serious even
    just on your own, a properly calibrated monitor is mandatory.

    You won't go wrong with a Sony PVM monitor, though even these require
    calibration (and like their consumer brethren are way too bright out of
    the box). They have much finer adjustments for gray scale than even the
    priciest consumer TVs, though a recent-vintage consumer set with ISF
    calibration may suffice if it's a model which has service menu
    paramaters to defeat the red push which still is common for TVs in
    America and Europe (I was at The Sony Store in Milan last summer, and
    the TVs there were just as garish and overdriven [which greatly
    exacerbated PAL flicker] as they do everywhere on this side of the pond).

    Again, I'd recommend Sony whose direct-view TVs have much better service
    menu adjustments for accurate convergence; my ISF technician states this
    is one reason Sony remains the Cadillac of consumer TVs.

    What make/model/age is the 19" TV you mention?

    Depending on who your clients are, it can also be useful to include with
    your edit suite an older, non-calibrated TV just to see what projects
    are going to look like on non-stellar displays. And ditto (in the US
    and Canada, at least) for a hi-scan HDTV with built-in scaling.

    As for size, I'd say 18-20" is the minimum desirable these days.
    Anything smaller just won't reveal the detail which even an analog NTSC
    (or PAL) signal may contain.

    If you can't afford a new PVM (though you might find a good second-hand
    one, or a trade-in or B stock unit from an industrial gear dealer), if
    you are in North America consider Sony's new 30" widescreen HDTV priced
    at just under $1000 US.

    For more detailed information on calibration go to www.imagingscience.com








    CPJ
     
    manitou910, Dec 7, 2004
    #2
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  3. Raskolnikov Alexis Friedemann

    Steve Guidry Guest

    Get Sony BVM or, Ikegami TM-20 series Monitors for real broadcast quality.
    Forget the PVM Sony's, (They crush the blacks) or anything that JVC or
    Panasonic makes - - not enough real controls like gain background, scan
    size, and centering (these are the controls that distinguish broadcast from
    lesser industrial monitors). Barco and Conrac used to be top brands as
    well, but I haven't heard much from them in recent years.

    Of course, a new 15" real broadcast monitor will set you back 4 grand or
    more. If that seems like too much, my favorite substitute would be a used
    Ike TM20-16 from ebay. You can probably get one for $500-600 in decent
    shape. I wouldn't go with anything older than a TM20-14, unless the seller
    can offer believable assurances that it has low usage.

    Steve
     
    Steve Guidry, Dec 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Thanks! I was looking at some of the lower end monitors on B&H, but I
    think I'll go the extra mile and see if I can get a used pro model as
    you suggested below. I'm not doing paid work, but want it to look
    professional Iin fact, most of my filming has been in Quicktime on a
    digital camera, Have a "real" 3 CCD camera on order.) but I'm an
    ex-painter and color accuracy and correct value/gamma is really
    important to me.

    Now here's the next question. Is there coloration to the digital
    signal from the analog-to-digital converter I'm using (ADVC 100)? This
    would not be an issue if I am outputting to a VHS tape since the tape
    would be getting the same signal as the monitor, but what if I output
    back to digital tape or make a DVD? Of course, I could run the DVD
    player or digital tape player to the monitor and compare, but it would
    be nice to know it's OK on the first go 'round.

    I realize the Canopus ADVC is not exactly "pro" equipment. Will I need
    to upgrade to something better or will these monitors take the digital
    signal directly from my computer?

    BTW, I'm using a 2 yr old Toshiba generic 19" TV. It's fairly junky
    and does not allow you to adjust individual colors. Still, as you
    suggested, it might be good to keep around the shop as a lowest common
    denominator playback test.

    -RA
     
    Raskolnikov Alexis Friedemann, Dec 8, 2004
    #4
  5. Raskolnikov Alexis Friedemann

    Steve Guidry Guest

    None of the monitors I mentioned will take a digital signal directly.

    If I'm understanding your needs, the goal will be to allow you to make value
    judgments about your signal based on the outputs of this monitor.

    So, after reviewing your posts (and making my own value judgments about your
    gear and experience level), I must advise you to have it calibrated by
    someone with the proper test gear and knowledge, as you can really screw it
    up if you try to tweak in it yourself without this gear and knowledge. You
    will need a test signal generator with at least the following : Color bars,
    white generator, black burst or black generator, and multiburst, as well as
    a way to test and adjust the scan size (I forget the pattern for this.)

    THEN, you'll need some knowledge of signal and color processing to know how
    to match your signals to a standard. In the analog world, this would be
    with a waveform monitor, vectorscope, and TBC. On the high end, you might
    even have a dedicated RGB color corrector. In the digital realm, most of
    these things are accomplished by filters, and most require significant
    render time.

    As an observation, most folks doing work "not for pay" don't want to spend
    money to acquire the tools, the time to learn how to do these things, and/or
    spend the render time to do them on personal projects.

    Steve
     
    Steve Guidry, Dec 16, 2004
    #5
  6. Raskolnikov Alexis Friedemann

    Yarock Guest

    Subject: Re: Calibrated Monitor for Post Production:
    From: "Steve Guidry"
    Date: 12/16/2004 2:20 PM Eastern Standard Time
    Message-id: <jelwd.1473$>

    None of the monitors I mentioned will take a digital signal directly.

    If I'm understanding your needs, the goal will be to allow you to make value
    judgments about your signal based on the outputs of this monitor.

    So, after reviewing your posts (and making my own value judgments about your
    gear and experience level), I must advise you to have it calibrated by
    someone with the proper test gear and knowledge, as you can really screw it
    up if you try to tweak in it yourself without this gear and knowledge. You
    will need a test signal generator with at least the following : Color bars,
    white generator, black burst or black generator, and multiburst, as well as
    a way to test and adjust the scan size (I forget the pattern for this.)

    THEN, you'll need some knowledge of signal and color processing to know how
    to match your signals to a standard. In the analog world, this would be
    with a waveform monitor, vectorscope, and TBC. On the high end, you might
    even have a dedicated RGB color corrector. In the digital realm, most of
    these things are accomplished by filters, and most require significant
    render time.

    As an observation, most folks doing work "not for pay" don't want to spend
    money to acquire the tools, the time to learn how to do these things, and/or
    spend the render time to do them on personal projects.

    Steve

    Steve,
    I followed instructions from web site in order to calibrate my older Panny 9"
    monitor, but I don't feel that I did it correctly. How would I go about finding
    someone to calibrate it professionaly? I'm in south Florida.
    Thanks
    Bruce Yarock
     
    Yarock, Dec 17, 2004
    #6
  7. Raskolnikov Alexis Friedemann

    Steve Guidry Guest

    Is it a broadcast grade monitor, or just an industrial one ? What's the
    model # ?

    Steve
     
    Steve Guidry, Dec 17, 2004
    #7
  8. You can go to www.panasonic.com and look up the nearest factory
    authorized service vendor. Monitor calibration is a rather generic
    function and any vendor that services pro video equipment can likely
    calibrate most any Sony or Panasonic, etc. monitor.

    Note that if the monitor is so old that it has problems (unstable,
    gassy, burned phosphor, etc.) it might not be worth the $$ to calibrate.
     
    Richard Crowley, Dec 17, 2004
    #8
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