Camera-to-camera copy by firewire

Discussion in 'Video Cameras' started by Geoff Clare, Apr 10, 2008.

  1. Geoff Clare

    Geoff Clare Guest

    I have an old Sony Digital-8 camcorder, and I'm planning to get a
    mini-DV model to replace it. I want to be able to copy my old tapes
    onto mini-DV. Having done a bit of research I know I should be able
    to do this camera-to-camera if the new camcorder has DV-in and I buy
    a 4 pin to 4 pin firewire cable, but there is one thing I'm not sure
    about: how to make the mini-DV camcorder start recording.

    Do camcorders that have DV-in enabled have a "record" button (either
    on the camera or on the remote control)? My Digital-8 doesn't, but
    that's because it is one of the UK models that came with DV-in
    disabled, and I enabled it by doing a firmware update.

    Or will the new camcorder expect a signal via the firewire cable to
    start it recording (which is what would happen if copying from PC to
    camcorder)? In which case, will my DCR-TRV120 send the necessary
    signal when I start it playing?

    The particular mini-DV model I will probably get is the Sony DCR-HC62.
    (I'm slightly put off by the touch-screen controls, but there doesn't
    seem to be a suitable alternative from Canon or Panasonic available in
    the same price range any more.)
     
    Geoff Clare, Apr 10, 2008
    #1
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  2. Geoff Clare

    G Hardy Guest

    Yes - at least both my Canons do. They have a "VCR mode" which has the
    control buttons hidden under a door in the handle. I've only ever done it
    once, and the recording had to be started manually - the donor camera was
    not controlling the recipient, or vice versa.
     
    G Hardy, Apr 10, 2008
    #2
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  3. Geoff Clare

    Geoff Clare Guest

    Thanks. I managed to find a user manual for the DCR-HC62E on Sony's
    website, and this confirms that the same applies to the Sony. (Although
    the "button" is an entry in the touch screen menus.)
     
    Geoff Clare, Apr 11, 2008
    #3
  4. Geoff Clare

    misterroy Guest

    We have a mini-DV camera at work. The most pointless piece of kit I
    have ever come across. If you want to edit your movies on a 3 inch
    screen, good luck to you.
     
    misterroy, Apr 12, 2008
    #4
  5. Geoff Clare

    :Jerry: Guest

    <snip>

    <google groups quote>
    We have a mini-DV camera at work. The most pointless piece of kit I
    have ever come across. If you want to edit your movies on a 3 inch
    screen, good luck to you.
    </quote>

    That's what the Firewire port is for, to transfer the video onto a
    computers hard disk and edit with video editing software, something
    all but the cheapest of cheapo digital camcorders have had since
    inception...

    Let me guess, not only are you a Google 'groupie' but your ISP is
    something like AOL or Tiscali, only shit-head, numsckulls and trolls
    use any of them - close the door on your way out. :~(
     
    :Jerry:, Apr 12, 2008
    #5
  6. Geoff Clare

    G Hardy Guest

    ...
    How big should the screen be before it's suitable for editing?
     
    G Hardy, Apr 12, 2008
    #6
  7. Geoff Clare

    misterroy Guest

    editing on a 3 inch screen, possibly using an onscreen display can
    never be described as optimal. The mini-DV camera at work only has a
    completed dvd as its output, before completion the disc is unreadable.
    The one here may be different I'd stick to teh tape and edit on a pc
     
    misterroy, Apr 13, 2008
    #7
  8. Geoff Clare

    G Hardy Guest

    in message...
    It's not a miniDV camera then. It's MiniDVD.

    Despite your misinformed post, I'd also suggest that your camera at work
    also has a TV output so you can edit on a 50" screen - if you have one of
    those at work, too.
     
    G Hardy, Apr 13, 2008
    #8
  9. Geoff Clare

    misterroy Guest

    what a prat I have been, the camera in question does use a tape, so
    the video can be digitally edited on pc.
    The camera at work does indeed have an output, but it is analogue, so
    a card needed and the quality will go down a generation.
    sorry for wasting time.
     
    misterroy, Apr 14, 2008
    #9
  10. Geoff Clare

    :Jerry: Guest

    <snip>
    <google groups quote>
    what a prat I have been, the camera in question does use a tape, so
    the video can be digitally edited on pc.
    The camera at work does indeed have an output, but it is analogue, so
    a card needed and the quality will go down a generation.
    sorry for wasting time.
    </quote>

    No, it won't go down a generation, that old chestnut was due to
    copying to another analogue recording (the generation was the analogue
    recording process), so as long as a decent analogue capture card or
    analogue to digital converter is used the quality should not suffer -
    it will stay at the same quality as the play-out.
     
    :Jerry:, Apr 14, 2008
    #10
  11. Geoff Clare

    G Hardy Guest

    We all have days like that ;o)

    If it is MiniDV or Digital8, it will have a firewire output. For less than
    £15 you can equip the PC with a firewire card and the cable to connect it to
    the camera. If you're on Windows, you can get Windows Movie Maker for
    editing for free. The port you need will be labelled iLink, IEEE1394 or
    Firewire. The computer end will probably have the bigger socket so make sure
    your cable has the right plugs.

    Some PCs and laptops have firewire ports preinstalled. Have a look around
    the PCs at your disposal to check this before buying a card and opening up a
    PC.
     
    G Hardy, Apr 14, 2008
    #11
  12. Geoff Clare

    G Hardy Guest

    There is, though, the caveat that there may be some loss due to lossy codec
    compression. For example, a good-quality analogue master sent down S Video
    can suffer noticeably from being compressed to DV en route from card to HDD.

    Another forum I am on seems to live by the "DV is god among codecs" mantra.
    It's really infuriating to see DV's use recommended as a means to sidestep
    encoding problems instead of actually identifying and fixing the problem and
    avoiding the quality drop.
     
    G Hardy, Apr 14, 2008
    #12
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