Cameras

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Scotty, Jan 5, 2012.

  1. Scotty

    Scotty Guest

    Hello all. I'd like to get some advice on a dslr for a novice on a
    budget (I'm on a disability pension). Any recommendations?

    Scott
     
    Scotty, Jan 5, 2012
    #1
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  2. Scotty

    Savageduck Guest

    There are decent entry level DSLR cameras which are reasonably priced
    for what they are. However the thing to remember is the camera and the
    bundled "Kit" lens is just the start along the spending road.
    Both Nikon and Canon have offerings which could work for your budget.
    The problem with your limited fixed income with the disability pension
    is, even an entry level DSLR might prove more of a burden on your
    budget than you had estimated once you start adding on additional
    lenses and accessories.

    I am a Nikon shooter, and my suggestions will include both Canon & Nikon:
    Canon
    EOS Rebel T2i +18-135mm IS lens $875
    EOS Rebel T2i +18-55mm IS II lens $729
    EOS Rebel T3 +18-55mm IS II lens $530
    EOS Rebel T3i +18-55mm IS II lens $799
    EOS Rebel T3i +18-135mm IS II lens $975

    Nikon:
    D3000 +18-55mm $779
    D3000 +18-55mm + 55-200mm VR $899.95 (B&H $749)
    <
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/666826-REG/Nikon_9718_D3000_SLR_Digital_Camera.htmlD3100 + 18-55mm $647
    D3100 +18-55mm + 55-200mm VR $817.45
    <
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/736704-REG/Nikon_9798_D3100_Digital_SLR_Camera.htmlD5100 + 18-55mm $847
    D5100 + 18-55mm + 55-200mm VR $1109.41 (B&H $1009.41)
    <
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/836592-REG/Nikon_D5100_Digital_SLR_Camera.html
    D90 + 18-105mm VR $1049
    D7000 + 18-105mm VR $1497

    ....and prices will just go up from there.

    You might also consider one of the other digital camera types such as
    the various super zoom offerings from various manufacturers.
    I would suggest taking a look through some of the reviews and tests in
    < http://www.dpreview.com/ >.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 6, 2012
    #2
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  3. Scotty

    tony cooper Guest

    For a novice on a budget, I would suggest checking Keh Camera for a
    used camera. They have a Nikon D60 with 18/55 lens listed at $379.
    Keh is a reputable dealer. If they say it's in good shape, I'd
    believe them.

    http://www.keh.com

    Adorama, also reputable, has the same used combo for $399.

    http://www.adorama.com

    (I own a D60)
     
    tony cooper, Jan 6, 2012
    #3
  4. Scotty

    Scotty Guest

    Thanks for the suggestions!

    I'm not a *complete* novice. I have a Canon AE1 Program and I had a
    Nikon something or other many, many years ago, and a few lenses and
    filters. But I never got further into it than the point-n-shoot level
    due to having 2 jobs, 2 kids and a wife to support, resulting in a
    serious lack of both time and money. Now I have a lot more time, and a
    little more money.

    If I was to look on Craigslist for used equipment, is there anything
    specific to look out for in camera bodies? I heard somewhere that
    there's a "shutter clicks" counter on some DSLRs - is that important? Do
    cmos chips degrade with use? Also, every digital camera I've used (which
    have all been point and shoot varieties), has taken so long to actually
    snap the pic after the button is depressed that the picture is ruined
    more often than not. Is this a problem on any entry-level DSLRs?

    Scott
     
    Scotty, Jan 6, 2012
    #4
  5. Scotty

    Savageduck Guest

    As Tony Cooper suggested, if you are going to look at used cameras
    rather check with reputable vendors such as B&H, Adorama, or KEH. While
    you might find something worthwhile on Craig's List or eBay the three
    vendors named are going to be for the most part more reliable.

    <
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/searc...sp=Filters-_-Category-_-Digital_Photographyor
    < http://tinyurl.com/77sbrkk >

    < http://www.adorama.com/catalog.tpl?op=category&cat1=Used >
    < http://www.keh.com/camera/format-Digital?s=1&bc=40 >

    Among the used DSLR's I can think of (both Tony and I are Nikon users)
    I would look at the D60 or D90 such as these two examples from KEH:
    <
    p://www.keh.com/camera/Nikon-Digital-Camera-Outfits/1/sku-DN019991073900?r=FEThis D60 with 18-55mm is pretty good for $379. Condition is listed as
    excellent.


    <
    http://www.keh.com/camera/Nikon-Digital-Camera-Outfits/1/sku-DN019991030510?r=FEThis D90 kit is listed at $1199.95 with a special lower price offer of
    $1089 if added as a purchase now. This is a great camera for a
    photographer who is familiar with working with more than just scene
    modes. This is listed as new.

    For a fine prosumer level camera there are also three D200's with
    18-70mm(a very good kit lens) 1x EX+ condition @ $725, 1x EX condition
    @ $665, and 1x BGN condition @ $569.

    Just some of my thoughts. Good hunting.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 6, 2012
    #5
  6. Try Bestbuy.com: currently $633.

    This lens gets variable reviews: mine is excellent
    (on a 30D camera, fewer pixels, however).

    Doug McDonald
     
    Doug McDonald, Jan 6, 2012
    #6
  7. Scotty

    tony cooper Guest

    I would *seriously* discourage you from buying a used camera from
    a Craigslist seller. A dslr camera is too complex a piece of
    equipment to be examined for problems under those conditions.
    If you don't know what to look for in the way of problems, you could
    be buying a pup.

    Shutter clicks, how many times the camera has taken a photo, is really
    not something to worry about. A camera can be dropped right out of
    the box. A sensor can go bad because the former user changed lenses
    and allowed dirt or dust to get in.

    You could be buying a stolen camera with a recorded serial number.
    The seller may want to meet someone with a few hundred dollars in
    their pocket and not have a sale in mind at all.

    You'll pay a little more buying used from Keh or Adorama, but they
    sell only cameras that technicians have checked out and rated. You
    will get what they advertise.
     
    tony cooper, Jan 6, 2012
    #7
  8. Scotty

    Scotty Guest

    Does this look like a good buy? : http://is.gd/pl4pRq (Future Shop link
    - I'm in Canada). It's a Canon Rebel T3 12.2MP DSLR with 18-55mm IS
    Lens, EF-S 55-250mm IS Lens, bag & spare battery for $699.99 CAD ($350 off)

    Scott
     
    Scotty, Jan 6, 2012
    #8
  9. Scotty

    Scotty Guest

    Thanks for the heads up. I'm pretty well versed in CL transactions - not
    everyone wants to meet at a transit station or parking lot. But I
    *don't* know what to look for in the way of problems, that's why I was
    hoping for a little advice on what's what. I'm not neccessarily looking
    for used, but it seems like a prudent thing to do since so many people
    buy hobby gear and then upgrade as they advance. How about lenses, are
    they easy enough for a novice to evaluate?

    Scott
     
    Scotty, Jan 6, 2012
    #9
  10. Scotty

    Pete A Guest

    No.
     
    Pete A, Jan 6, 2012
    #10
  11. Scotty

    tony cooper Guest

    Disclaimer: I know nothing about the market for the Canon camera
    above or the retailer advertising that product. My comments are
    observations about the market in general.

    Another thing to beware of are advertisements for sales of (new)
    cameras at prices that seem too good to be true. Place an order, and
    the retailer will call you and want you to add several over-priced
    accessories like spare batteries, filters, etc. The profit on those
    extras will make the overall sale in line with other, honest,
    retailers and the total price not a bargain.

    If you don't order the extras, you'll be told the camera is on
    back-order, unavailable, or sold out. Your order will be canceled.

    If an internet sale, you will have given them your credit card number
    when placing the order. Just hope they don't ship and charge for the
    extras.

    The internet is plagued with retailers like this. While not the case
    here, the scam is particularly used by New York outfits.

    BTW, Canadian prices, so I've been told, are higher than US prices.
    Readers here from the US may not be able to tell if a particular
    price is attractive or not. As far as I know, Henry's is the most
    commonly used Canadian dealer and a good source of comparison.
     
    tony cooper, Jan 6, 2012
    #11
  12. Scotty

    Scotty Guest

    (snip)

    Future Shop is Canada's largest electronics retailer, they've been owned
    by Best Buy for a few years now, and they have very similar stores to
    Best Buy. They're reputable enough, and I've never been treated that way
    when buying from them.
    I guess I wasn't very clear about it, but what I was actually asking
    about was the camera itself (the price in the ad is easy enough to
    comparison shop, and it looks pretty good). Is the Canon Rebel T3 a
    reasonably good camera for a novice, and are the lenses in the package a
    good start?

    Scott
     
    Scotty, Jan 6, 2012
    #12
  13. Scotty

    Scotty Guest

    I see. Thanks for your help.

    Scott
     
    Scotty, Jan 6, 2012
    #13
  14. Scotty

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On 1/5/2012 6:51 PM, tony cooper wrote:
    :
    :
    : > I would *seriously* discourage you from buying a used camera from
    : > a Craigslist seller. A dslr camera is too complex a piece of
    : > equipment to be examined for problems under those conditions.
    : > If you don't know what to look for in the way of problems, you could
    : > be buying a pup.
    :
    : Thanks for the heads up. I'm pretty well versed in CL transactions - not
    : everyone wants to meet at a transit station or parking lot. But I
    : *don't* know what to look for in the way of problems, that's why I was
    : hoping for a little advice on what's what. I'm not neccessarily looking
    : for used, but it seems like a prudent thing to do since so many people
    : buy hobby gear and then upgrade as they advance. How about lenses, are
    : they easy enough for a novice to evaluate?

    Alas, no. Lenses have their own complexities (autofocus, image stabilization,
    communication with the camera re exposure settings, etc.), all of which are
    fertile ground for hard-to-discover problems. If I understand your situation,
    your kids are grown and your financial situation isn't bad, but you're on a
    fixed pension, which limits your ability to take risks. I have to agree with
    Tony and the Duck that you should stick to reputable dealers unless and until
    you're as comfortable answering these questions as you are asking them.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jan 6, 2012
    #14
  15. Scotty

    MI Guest

    In my personal experience, I wouldn't buy a postage stamp from the Future
    Shop. Just try to get anything unsatisfactory taken care of. Also, I have
    found no one who knows anything about what they are selling.
     
    MI, Jan 7, 2012
    #15
  16. Scotty

    tony cooper Guest

    I don't think it makes any difference. All the currently available
    major brand cameras offer pretty much the same thing at equal price
    points. I'm a Nikon person, some here are Canon people, there's at
    least one Sony shooter, and probably some Pentax and Olympus people.

    I belong to two camera clubs and have been around serious and
    professional photographers quite a bit. I've *never* heard one say
    "If I would have purchased a (brand) camera instead of this (brand)
    camera, my photos would be better."

    You really don't start to see a major difference until you start
    buying lenses. All the majors offer better lenses than the kit lenses
    that come with packages, but the kit lenses are quite adequate.

    I read a lot of camera forums and look at a lot of really good
    photographs. They are usually good because the photographer developed
    a good eye for subject matter and did a good job of composing the
    photo. The camera was just a tool.

    There are exceptions: good sports photography requires a good long
    lens (on any brand body) and good macro photography requires a
    dedicated macro lens (on any brand body) and some peripheral
    equipment.

    My suggestion is to buy a package deal like the Canon or one of the
    Nikons, and wait until you feel that you can do more than the kit
    lenses allow you to before buying an expensive lens. If you live
    that long.
     
    tony cooper, Jan 7, 2012
    #16
  17. Scotty

    PeterN Guest


    Also, some shady dealers also will ship a different camera, claiming
    that they wanted to get you a camera. You have the right to return the
    camera, but somehow they have been known to find a reason you don't get
    full credit.
     
    PeterN, Jan 7, 2012
    #17
  18. Scotty

    Savageduck Guest

    ....and then two of the most reputable vendors B&H and Adorama have NYC
    as a home, and are both thoroughly trustworthy.

    I believe the notorious "shell game" vendors are to be found in
    Brooklyn and a little further East in New Jersey.
     
    Savageduck, Jan 7, 2012
    #18
  19. Scotty

    Scotty Guest

    Sounds like good advice. Thanks.

    Scott
     
    Scotty, Jan 7, 2012
    #19
  20. Scotty

    Scotty Guest

    I'm pretty sure they don't sell postage stamps, but I agree about the
    lack of knowledge. For most things they carry though (that I'd be
    willing to buy), the level of expertise found in the sales staff (or
    anyone else in the company), isn't very important to me. Expertise can
    be found elsewhere.

    Scott
     
    Scotty, Jan 7, 2012
    #20
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