Can now adapt Leica M lenses to a DSLR

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by RichA, Dec 5, 2008.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    http://www.cameraquest.com/adaptnew.htm

    Digital Micro 4/3 Lens Adapters are in preparation. Leica M (yes,
    you are reading it right, Leica M) lens adapter to Micro 4/3 adapter
    expected to arrive by late December! $175 email to get on wait list!
     
    RichA, Dec 5, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. And just why would you want to use a full-frame lens on a quarter-frame
    camera?

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 5, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. RichA

    Guest Guest

    And just why would you want to use a full-frame lens on a quarter-frame
    camera?[/QUOTE]

    for someone who already owns such lenses.
     
    Guest, Dec 5, 2008
    #3
  4. for someone who already owns such lenses.[/QUOTE]

    OK, but even then, you aren't getting the full performance from the lens
    (it's a 50% crop), and the lenses will be bigger and heavier than a
    designed-for-purpose equivalent. Great if you happen to have such lenses
    lying around, I agree!

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 5, 2008
    #4
  5. RichA

    * Guest

    for someone who already owns such lenses.[/QUOTE]

    If you can afford Leica glass, why not buy a Leica camera, not a toy micro
    4/3 system?
     
    *, Dec 5, 2008
    #5
  6. RichA

    tomm42 Guest

    Leica lenses tend to be small and compact, maybe heavy cause they are
    all metal. My 35mm f1.4 Summilux is just about an inch long and a
    little over 1.5 inches wide, what's so big about that, a Leica mount
    Canon 25mm I have sticks about 1/2 inch from the camera and is
    extremely light. Would be nice to use the sweet point of these lenses
    on a digital camera. All my Leica lenses are over 20 years old and I
    bought them when prices were low, still have 2 M2 cameras one I bought
    for $125. While the M cameras are wonderful to use it is still film
    and after shooting digital for the last 3 years it is hard to go back.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, Dec 5, 2008
    #6
  7. RichA

    Mark Thomas Guest

    Well, there is the matter of the exorbitant price of the Leica digitals,
    and then there's the small fact that they seem to be regarded as the
    worst cameras Leica has ever produced, 'cept maybe the M5...

    Given the very first m4/3 camera is getting some rather positive
    reviews, maybe it is more than a toy. Even if I didn't have to pay for
    it, I'd rather have a G1 than an M8.
     
    Mark Thomas, Dec 5, 2008
    #7
  8. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Do you have any Nikon or Canon film lens you use on a crop body? The
    novelty here is being able to use rangefinder lenses on a camera not a
    $6000 Leica.
     
    RichA, Dec 5, 2008
    #8
  9. RichA

    RichA Guest

    I don't know. Why do Canon users own other brands of lenses?
    Besides, not all Leica lenses cost four figures. Just some of them.
     
    RichA, Dec 5, 2008
    #9
  10. RichA wrote:
    []
    No, I sold all my bulky and heavy film stuff while it was still worth
    something.

    What's the point of only using a quarter of the focal plane area, though?

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 6, 2008
    #10
  11. RichA

    Not Given Guest

    hmmm, a small nit-pick... the micro 4/3 is not a dSLR
     
    Not Given, Dec 6, 2008
    #11
  12. RichA

    Not Given Guest

    Leica lenses tend to be small and compact, maybe heavy cause they are
    all metal. My 35mm f1.4 Summilux is just about an inch long and a
    little over 1.5 inches wide, what's so big about that, a Leica mount
    Canon 25mm I have sticks about 1/2 inch from the camera and is
    extremely light. Would be nice to use the sweet point of these lenses
    on a digital camera. All my Leica lenses are over 20 years old and I
    bought them when prices were low, still have 2 M2 cameras one I bought
    for $125. While the M cameras are wonderful to use it is still film
    and after shooting digital for the last 3 years it is hard to go back.

    Tom

    But with a severe crop factor, your 35mm f:1.5 Summilux is a cropped 70mm
     
    Not Given, Dec 6, 2008
    #12
  13. RichA

    Not Given Guest

    "David J Taylor"
    Plus the advantage of manual focus, and manual aperture on a modern camera.
    It's like 1968 again.
     
    Not Given, Dec 6, 2008
    #13
  14. Ah. Retro?

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 6, 2008
    #14
  15. RichA

    RichA Guest

    I used to know people who thought all stereo components had to be from
    the same brand too....
     
    RichA, Dec 6, 2008
    #15
  16. 4/3 format is a quarter of full-frame.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 6, 2008
    #16
  17. RichA

    TJ Guest

    I have the Leica R 19, 35 and 90 F2.8 Elmarit lenses. Heavy, old
    but good with resolution which sometimes defies the eye. 90mm is
    hardly even telephoto by today's standards yet it pulled in 1" steel
    guy wires at 1.5 miles.

    I was thinking about using an adapter to put them on an Oly 4/3
    digital back. Which are very good cameras.

    But the bottom line is the Canon APS-C sensor has almost 50% more
    surface area. (329 sq mm) compared to the 4/3 which has only 225 sq
    mm, while the 'full' 35mm film/sensor area is 864 sq mm.

    Which is why I'm planning to buy a Canon XSi/ 450D.

    I don't expect miracles with the wide angle 19mm Elmarit with the
    1.6x crop factor on the PAS-C but the other lenses may show promise.

    Has anyone used Leica lenses on Canon EOS backs?

    R
     
    TJ, Dec 15, 2008
    #17
  18. RichA

    Alan Hoyle Guest

    In general, to have a lens adaptable to your camera body, the lens's
    "film-to-flange" distance needs to be greater-than or equal to the
    film-to-flange distance of your camera body.

    Lenses from systems with larger flange distances (e.g. Nikon F-mount
    at 46.5mm, Olympus OM at 46mm, etc.) can be used with adapters on many more
    camera bodies. Bodies from systems with smaller flange distances
    (4/3 at 38.67mm, Canon EF at 44 mm, u4/3 at 20mm, etc.) can take a
    greater range of lenses.

    According to a cursory Google search, Leica M have a quite small
    flange distance of approximately 28mm, due to the fact that it's a
    rangefinder rather than an SLR, and doesn't need space for a reflex
    mirror. Again, Canon's EF SLR mount has a flange distance of
    approxmately 44 mm.

    The reason why the u4/3 cameras have such a large range of possiblites
    for adaptors is that the removal of the reflex mirror allows them to
    have a flange distance of 20mm.

    There do exist some adapters that can mount small flange distance
    lenses on larger flange distance bodies, but doing so removes
    possibility of focusing at infinity. It is also possible to modify
    some lenses and cameras to connect to different mounts. E.g. Konica
    Hexanon lenses can be relatively easily modified to mount on 4/3
    cameras.

    Unless Canon comes out with a new, non-SLR mount that's akin to the
    u4/3 mount (i.e. one that removes reflex mirror), it is unlikely that
    you'll be able to use an unmodified Leica R lens on an unmodified
    Canon body and get full use of the lens.

    -alan
     
    Alan Hoyle, Dec 15, 2008
    #18
  19. RichA

    TJ Guest

    Thanks for your detailed reply, Alan

    I now have a Leica R to EOS adapter from CAMPLUS from Hong Kong on
    ebay http://stores.ebay.co.uk/camplus-shop.

    This was $13 and is a perfect fit for all lenses. It has a stop to
    prevent overwinding the adapter ring onto the EOS mount. And nothing,
    even the 19mm comes anywhwere near the EOS mirror. So I consider
    myself lucky.

    My question now is - as the 450D has the APS-C with the 1.6x factor,
    does this change the DEPTH OF FIELD characteristic of whatever manual
    lens is on it?

    The 19mm (on a 35mm camera) is effectively point-and-shoot depth of
    field it is so large at anything above f4. On the 450D will it change
    to that of a 28mm lens??

    Thanks

    R
     
    TJ, Dec 23, 2008
    #19
  20. RichA

    TJ Guest

    The Elmarit 90 f2.8 with the 1.6x factor has proved to be the most
    useful lens as a compact medium telephoto, provided you use IN CAMERA
    custom settings to increase contrast, sharpness and a little color
    and UNDEREXPOSING by 1 to1-1/3 stops in bright light.

    For anything beyond 20m it is effectively point and shoot with
    instant shutter release, so if you get the (moving) subject in the
    frame, you've got the shot.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157612761031528/
     
    TJ, Jan 19, 2009
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.